2016 Stonehenge Summer Solstice Information

17 06 2016

Once upon a time (until 1977, actually) it was possible to turn up and wander around the world-famous prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, touching ancient stones and experiencing wonderment at being in such an atmospheric place, often alone. Not any more – all those hands were contributing to erosion and today’s multitudinous visitors may look but not touch.

druids-equinox

Stonehenge began as a circular ditch and earth bank constructed around 3100 BC, with the standing stone circle erected some nine centuries later. Research suggests that Stonehenge marked an important burial site, but this prosaic explanation is not accepted by everyone.  The purpose of Stonehenge has long been passionately debated with diverse theories mooted – these include religious ritual, astronomical observation and assorted complex and often outlandish supernatural notions. Was it really a landing site for space travellers? Probably not.

Whatever the truth, the place retains an aura of mystery. It was the site of the
Stonehenge Free Festival
1972 and 1984, when revellers gathered to celebrate alternative culture at the summer solstice. That laid-back era came to end in 1985 when the police did battle with ‘New Agers’ bent on reaching Stonehenge after the festival was banned.

Guardians English Heritage relented in 1999, and those who wish to experience the summer solstice in the company of like-minded people are now permitted to do so. Many thousands who gather to do just that invariably experience powerful emotion at the moment when the sun rises over the mystical circle on solstice morning, and find themselves amidst all sorts of alternative believers like neo-pagans and druids in fantastic garb who are conducting esoteric ceremonies. It’s a magical moment, but reality soon intrudes – the site must be cleared by 08.00 so Stonehenge can revert to lucrative ‘tourist business as usual’. (content extracted from 501 Must-be-there Events (501 Series) by David Brown and Arthur Findlay)

English Heritage are pleased to welcome people to Stonehenge to celebrate this year’s Summer Solstice. This is the 17th year that English Heritage has provided access to the stones and are looking forward to a peaceful and sober celebration.

MONDAY 20th JUNE
Access to monument field – 7pm
Sunset – 9:26pm
TUESDAY 21st JUNE
Sunrise – 4:52am
Monument field closes – 8am

 Timings for Summer Solstice at Stonehenge
    • SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS 19.00 hours (7pm) 20 June (see new charges)
    • ACCESS TO STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD 19.00 hours (7pm) 20 June
    • LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK 06.00 hours (6am) 21 June – or earlier if full
    • STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD CLOSES 08.00 hours (8am) 21 June
    • SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED 12.00 hours (12 Noon) 21 Jun

“We strongly advise anyone planning to come to Stonehenge for solstice to leave their cars at home and travel by public transport. Salisbury is easily accessible by train and the local Salisbury Reds bus company will be running a special service from Salisbury to Stonehenge through Saturday night and into the next day. Solstice Events are offering their usual transport from Bath and Stonehenge Guided Tours are offering their popular annual tour / transfer from London.

 

Bus service information: including timetables and costs can be found on Salisbury Reds website.
Train service information: trains run regularly to Salisbury from London, Bristol, Bath and Southampton. Train times, tickets and further information for your train journey can be found at:
South West Trains
South West Trains
Tel: 0845 6000 650
Great Western Railways
Great Western
Tel: 0845 7000 125
National Rail Enquiries
National Rail Enquiries
Tel: 0845 7484 950

Follow @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @HighwaysEngland @Wiltshirepolice and @VistWiltshire for #summersolstice updates on the night.

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE BROADCAST

The Stonehege News Blog
Respect the Stones and each other!
Follow the Solstice News on Twitter: @St0nehenge  and Facebook

 

 

 





When is the Stonehenge summer solstice 2016? Everything you need to know including times and rituals

28 05 2016

Here’s everything you need to know about the longest day of the year and traditions surrounding the summer solstice

Midsummer-Solstice-celebrations-at-Stonehenge

Party time: Druids, pagans and revellers take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge

Every year, around this time, we start talking about the summer solstice.

Mostly it’s because it’s the longest day of the year, and there’s a very British pessimism that says the days will immediately start to shorten into winter from now on.

But there’s also the shenanigans at Stonehenge, general celebrations and a pause to celebrate the summer.

But what does it all mean?

What is it?

It’s generally understood to mark the middle of summer – even though some of us may feel like we haven’t really had the first half yet in the UK.

Technically, it’s when the tilt of Earth’s axis is most inclined towards the sun, and that’s why we get the most daylight of the year.

In the winter solstice, we’re tilted furthest away from the sun, hence shorter hours of daylight and the shortest day.

The word solstice is derived from the Latin words sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still).

Read more: New Stonehenge alignment theory proved right as monument’s tallest stone points at solstice sunset

When is it?

In the northern hemisphere, the summer solstice takes place between June 20 and 22. This year it’s on Monday, June 20.

As it happens twice annually, the winter solstice in the UK is between December 20 and 22.

In London on the summer solstice, the sun will rise at 04:43 and set at 21:21.

Near Stonehenge in Salisbury, sunrise will be at 04:52 and sunset will occur at 21:26.

Why Stonehenge?

The midsummer solstice is being celebrated at Stonehenge on Saturday into Sunday and at the Avebury stone circle from Friday until Monday.

Thousands flock to the English Heritage site for the solstice in a tradition which has its roots in pagan times, when Midsummer Day was considered to have power.

Of those who attend, many are druids, but some are tourists.

This year it’s falling on a weekend for the first time in more than a decade and is expected to draw much larger crowds.

The way that the stones are positioned is said to be aligned with sunrises on the two annual solstices.

Read more: Stonehenge attracts thousands as Pagans mark longest day of the year with celebration

Although not much is known about its formation, those facts are thought to be involved with whatever religious, mystical or spiritual elements were central to its construction.

The monument field at Stonehenge is open from 19:00 on Monday 20 June to 08:00 on Tuesday 21 June. Admission is free, but parking fees apply.

The Solstice Car Park opens at 7pm on 20th June with last admissions at 6am (or when full, if earlier) on 21st June. The car park will close at 12 noon on 21st June.

Visitors, including sunrise-worshipping Druids for whom it is a religious occasion, are encouraged to use public transport or arrange to car share.

How else do people celebrate it?

It’s not just for the arch-druids in Wiltshire – there are celebrations worldwide among lots of different cultures.

The holidays, festivals and rituals do tend to have themes of religion or fertility.

Read more: ‘Fridgehenge’ pranksters mark summer solstice with homage to Stonehenge – made out of white goods

In Latvia there’s Jāņi, when women wear wreaths on their heads. Estonia has Jaanipäev or St John’s Day, which marks a change in the farming year.

Wianki happens in Poland, with roots in a pagan religious event, and Kupala Night happens in Russia and Ukraine, where people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith.

Are the days going to be shorter now?

They will of course get shorter between now and the winter solstice on December 21, but don’t worry, we’re not talking early dark nights quite yet.

Read more: Stonehenge and Statue of Liberty ‘in direct and immediate danger’ from climate change

Article Source: Kirstie McCrum ,  (Daily Mirror)

Stonehenge Summmer Solscice Open Access

“We strongly advise anyone planning to come to Stonehenge for solstice to leave their cars at home and travel by public transport. Salisbury is easily accessible by train and the local Salisbury Reds bus company will be running a special service from Salisbury to Stonehenge through Saturday night and into the next day. Solstice Events are offering their usual transport from Bath and Stonehenge guided tours are offering their small group tour from London.

Follow  @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @HighwaysEngland and @Wiltshirepolice for#summersolstice updates on the night.

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE BROADCAST

The Stonehenge News Blog

 

 

 





Stonehenge Summer Solstice 2016 Open Access

24 04 2016

English Heritage is pleased to welcome people to Stonehenge to celebrate this year’s Summer Solstice. This is the 17th year that English Heritage has provided access to the stones and are looking forward to a peaceful celebration.

MONDAY 20th JUNE
Access to monument field – 7pm
Sunset – 9:26pm
TUESDAY 21st JUNE
Sunrise – 4:52am
Monument field closes – 8am
solstice-astronomy
The Solstice Car Park opens at 7pm on 20th June with last admissions at 6am (or when full, if earlier) on 21st June. The car park will close at 12 noon on 21st June.Alcohol is not permitted in the monument field during Summer Solstice.Admission to the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge is free of charge, however please note that parking fees in the official car park apply – cars: £15, commercial coaches and minibuses: £50, motorcycles: £5.

Conditions of Entry
 Amplified music is not permitted in or around the monument field.
 No alcohol is allowed within the monument or the monument field. Alcohol will be
confiscated or individuals in possession of alcohol will be asked to leave.
 Drunken, disorderly and anti-social behaviour will not be tolerated and anybody
considered to be behaving in this way will be asked to leave by security staff and/or
the police and will not be allowed back in.
 Illegal drugs are illegal at Stonehenge as they are anywhere else. The police will be
on site and will take action against anyone breaking the law.
 Please don’t bring any glass in to the monument field. Many people walk barefoot
and livestock and wildlife also graze in the area. Any glass items will be confiscated.
 Please do not climb or stand on any of the stones – this includes the stones that
have fallen. This is for your own safety and also to protect this special site and
respect those around you.
 Please be aware that in order to keep everybody safe, random searching may be
undertaken. Any items found that might be used in an illegal or offensive manner will
be confiscated.
 Camping equipment, fires, Chinese lanterns, fireworks, candles, tea-lights or BBQs
are not permitted at Stonehenge, in the Solstice Car Park, or anywhere in the
surrounding National Trust land.
 In the interests of safety, sleeping bags or duvets are not allowed on site. Sleeping
on the ground creates a trip hazard and can interfere with the work of emergency
services and hinder their ability to help people. Small ground sheets and blankets are
permitted for people to sit on but please do not bring chairs etc (unless used as a
recognised disability aid). Shooting-sticks are not permitted.
 To help us reduce the amount of litter on site, leafleting or flyering is not allowed.
 Drones or any type of remote-controlled flying devices are not permitted at
Stonehenge or in any of the Solstice Car Parks.

Admission to Stonehenge

• Admission to the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge is free of charge.
• There is a charge for parking – cars: £15, commercial coaches and minibuses: £50,
motorcycles: £5.
• Public transport is available from Salisbury.
• Access to the car park will start at 7pm
• Children under 16 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.
Please remember that you will not be allowed access to the Monument with the following
items:
– Alcohol
– Drugs
– Large bags or rucksacks (or similar items)
– Sleeping bags or duvets
– Flaming torches, Chinese lanterns, fireworks or candles etc.
– Dogs (with the exception of registered assistance dogs), pets or other creatures
– Camping equipment, including foldaway chairs, garden furniture, shooting-sticks
– BBQs or gas cylinders
– Glass bottles or other glass objects
– Trolleys, wheel barrows or any other form of porterage
– Pushchairs or buggies that are not exclusively used for a child
– Large “golf-style” umbrellas, gazebos
– Drones or any kind of remote control aircraft

From :http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/plan-your-visit/summer-solstice/

“We strongly advise anyone planning to come to Stonehenge for solstice to leave their cars at home and travel by public transport. Salisbury is easily accessible by train and the local Salisbury Reds bus company will be running a special service from Salisbury to Stonehenge through Saturday night and into the next day. Solstice Events are offering their usual transport from Bath and Stonehenge guided tours are offering their small group tour from London.

Follow  @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @HighwaysEngland and @Wiltshirepolice for #summersolstice updates on the night.

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE BROADCAST

 

The Stonehenge News Blog




Moon Phases for Stonehenge, Wiltshire 2016

23 01 2016

moon-phase

Lunation New Moon First Quarter Full Moon Third Quarter Duration
1150 2 Jan 05:30 29d 15h 01m
1151 10 Jan 01:30 16 Jan 23:26 24 Jan 01:45 1 Feb 03:27 29d 13h 08m
1152 8 Feb 14:38 15 Feb 07:46 22 Feb 18:19 1 Mar 23:10 29d 11h 16m
1153 9 Mar 01:54 15 Mar 17:02 23 Mar 12:00 31 Mar 16:16 29d 9h 29m
1154 7 Apr 12:23 14 Apr 04:59 22 Apr 06:23 30 Apr 04:28 29d 8h 06m
1155 6 May 20:29 13 May 18:02 21 May 22:14 29 May 13:11 29d 7h 30m
1156 5 Jun 03:59 12 Jun 09:09 20 Jun 12:02 27 Jun 19:18 29d 8h 01m
1157 4 Jul 12:00 12 Jul 01:51 19 Jul 23:56 26 Jul 23:59 29d 9h 44m
1158 2 Aug 21:44 10 Aug 19:20 18 Aug 10:26 25 Aug 04:40 29d 12h 19m
1159 1 Sep 10:03 9 Sep 12:48 16 Sep 20:05 23 Sep 10:56 29d 15h 08m
1160 1 Oct 01:11 9 Oct 05:32 16 Oct 05:23 22 Oct 20:13 29d 17h 27m
1161 30 Oct 17:38 7 Nov 19:51 14 Nov 13:52 21 Nov 08:33 29d 18h 40m
1162 29 Nov 12:18 7 Dec 09:02 14 Dec 00:05 21 Dec 01:55 29d 18h 35m
1163 29 Dec 06:53 29d 17h 14m
* All times are local time Stonehenge. Time is adjusted for DST when applicable. Dates are based on the Gregorian calendar.

Links:
http://www.timeanddate.com/moon/phases/uk/london
http://www.calendar-uk.co.uk/lunar-calendar/
http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/why-was-stonehenge-built

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for daily Sunrise and Moon phase times

 





The Stonehenge Calendar. Sunrise and Sunset Times 2015

21 07 2015

Stonehenge was primarily a functional scientific instrument, used for measuring angles.  The angles of interest were the rising and setting bearings of the sun, moon, and stars.  It was therefore possible, over a period of time, to map the entire visible sky. Please find below accurate times for the sunset, sunrise and the moon phases.

Stonehenge Sunrise

July 2015
Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 4:56am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 8:33pm
Moonset: 4:39am
2

Sunrise: 4:56am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 9:22pm
Moonset: 5:39am
3

Sunrise: 4:57am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 10:05pm
Moonset: 6:46am
4

Sunrise: 4:58am
Sunset: 9:25pm
Moonrise: 10:42pm
Moonset: 7:59am
5

Sunrise: 4:59am
Sunset: 9:25pm
Moonrise: 11:14pm
Moonset: 9:15am
6

Sunrise: 5:00am
Sunset: 9:24pm
Moonrise: 11:44pm
Moonset: 10:32am
7

Sunrise: 5:00am
Sunset: 9:24pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 11:49am
8

Sunrise: 5:01am
Sunset: 9:23pm
Moonrise: 12:12am
Moonset: 1:05pm
9

Sunrise: 5:02am
Sunset: 9:23pm
Moonrise: 12:41am
Moonset: 2:20pm
10

Sunrise: 5:03am
Sunset: 9:22pm
Moonrise: 1:11am
Moonset: 3:33pm
11

Sunrise: 5:04am
Sunset: 9:21pm
Moonrise: 1:45am
Moonset: 4:44pm
12

Sunrise: 5:05am
Sunset: 9:20pm
Moonrise: 2:23am
Moonset: 5:50pm
13

Sunrise: 5:06am
Sunset: 9:20pm
Moonrise: 3:07am
Moonset: 6:50pm
14

Sunrise: 5:08am
Sunset: 9:19pm
Moonrise: 3:57am
Moonset: 7:43pm
15

Sunrise: 5:09am
Sunset: 9:18pm
Moonrise: 4:52am
Moonset: 8:28pm
16

Sunrise: 5:10am
Sunset: 9:17pm
Moonrise: 5:52am
Moonset: 9:06pm
17

Sunrise: 5:11am
Sunset: 9:16pm
Moonrise: 6:54am
Moonset: 9:39pm
18

Sunrise: 5:12am
Sunset: 9:15pm
Moonrise: 7:57am
Moonset: 10:07pm
19

Sunrise: 5:13am
Sunset: 9:14pm
Moonrise: 9:00am
Moonset: 10:32pm
20

Sunrise: 5:15am
Sunset: 9:13pm
Moonrise: 10:03am
Moonset: 10:55pm
21

Sunrise: 5:16am
Sunset: 9:11pm
Moonrise: 11:05am
Moonset: 11:18pm
22

Sunrise: 5:17am
Sunset: 9:10pm
Moonrise: 12:07pm
Moonset: 11:42pm
23

Sunrise: 5:19am
Sunset: 9:09pm
Moonrise: 1:09pm
Moonset: none
24

Sunrise: 5:20am
Sunset: 9:08pm
Moonrise: 2:12pm
Moonset: 12:06am
25

Sunrise: 5:21am
Sunset: 9:06pm
Moonrise: 3:15pm
Moonset: 12:34am
26

Sunrise: 5:23am
Sunset: 9:05pm
Moonrise: 4:19pm
Moonset: 1:05am
27

Sunrise: 5:24am
Sunset: 9:04pm
Moonrise: 5:20pm
Moonset: 1:42am
28

Sunrise: 5:26am
Sunset: 9:02pm
Moonrise: 6:19pm
Moonset: 2:27am
29

Sunrise: 5:27am
Sunset: 9:01pm
Moonrise: 7:11pm
Moonset: 3:22am
30

Sunrise: 5:28am
Sunset: 8:59pm
Moonrise: 7:58pm
Moonset: 4:25am
31

Sunrise: 5:30am
Sunset: 8:58pm
Moonrise: 8:39pm
Moonset: 5:36am

August 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 5:31am
Sunset: 8:56pm
Moonrise: 9:14pm
Moonset: 6:53am
2

Sunrise: 5:33am
Sunset: 8:54pm
Moonrise: 9:46pm
Moonset: 8:12am
3

Sunrise: 5:34am
Sunset: 8:53pm
Moonrise: 10:16pm
Moonset: 9:31am
4

Sunrise: 5:36am
Sunset: 8:51pm
Moonrise: 10:45pm
Moonset: 10:50am
5

Sunrise: 5:37am
Sunset: 8:49pm
Moonrise: 11:16pm
Moonset: 12:07pm
6

Sunrise: 5:39am
Sunset: 8:48pm
Moonrise: 11:48pm
Moonset: 1:23pm
7

Sunrise: 5:40am
Sunset: 8:46pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 2:35pm
8

Sunrise: 5:42am
Sunset: 8:44pm
Moonrise: 12:25am
Moonset: 3:42pm
9

Sunrise: 5:43am
Sunset: 8:42pm
Moonrise: 1:06am
Moonset: 4:44pm
10

Sunrise: 5:45am
Sunset: 8:41pm
Moonrise: 1:54am
Moonset: 5:39pm
11

Sunrise: 5:47am
Sunset: 8:39pm
Moonrise: 2:46am
Moonset: 6:26pm
12

Sunrise: 5:48am
Sunset: 8:37pm
Moonrise: 3:44am
Moonset: 7:06pm
13

Sunrise: 5:50am
Sunset: 8:35pm
Moonrise: 4:44am
Moonset: 7:40pm
14

Sunrise: 5:51am
Sunset: 8:33pm
Moonrise: 5:46am
Moonset: 8:09pm
15

Sunrise: 5:53am
Sunset: 8:31pm
Moonrise: 6:49am
Moonset: 8:36pm
16

Sunrise: 5:54am
Sunset: 8:29pm
Moonrise: 7:52am
Moonset: 9:00pm
17

Sunrise: 5:56am
Sunset: 8:27pm
Moonrise: 8:54am
Moonset: 9:23pm
18

Sunrise: 5:57am
Sunset: 8:25pm
Moonrise: 9:56am
Moonset: 9:47pm
19

Sunrise: 5:59am
Sunset: 8:23pm
Moonrise: 10:58am
Moonset: 10:11pm
20

Sunrise: 6:01am
Sunset: 8:21pm
Moonrise: 12:00pm
Moonset: 10:37pm
21

Sunrise: 6:02am
Sunset: 8:19pm
Moonrise: 1:02pm
Moonset: 11:06pm
22

Sunrise: 6:04am
Sunset: 8:17pm
Moonrise: 2:04pm
Moonset: 11:40pm
23

Sunrise: 6:05am
Sunset: 8:15pm
Moonrise: 3:05pm
Moonset: none
24

Sunrise: 6:07am
Sunset: 8:13pm
Moonrise: 4:04pm
Moonset: 12:20am
25

Sunrise: 6:08am
Sunset: 8:11pm
Moonrise: 4:58pm
Moonset: 1:08am
26

Sunrise: 6:10am
Sunset: 8:09pm
Moonrise: 5:48pm
Moonset: 2:06am
27

Sunrise: 6:12am
Sunset: 8:07pm
Moonrise: 6:31pm
Moonset: 3:12am
28

Sunrise: 6:13am
Sunset: 8:04pm
Moonrise: 7:09pm
Moonset: 4:25am
29

Sunrise: 6:15am
Sunset: 8:02pm
Moonrise: 7:43pm
Moonset: 5:43am
30

Sunrise: 6:16am
Sunset: 8:00pm
Moonrise: 8:15pm
Moonset: 7:04am
31

Sunrise: 6:18am
Sunset: 7:58pm
Moonrise: 8:45pm
Moonset: 8:25am

September 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 6:19am
Sunset: 7:56pm
Moonrise: 9:16pm
Moonset: 9:46am
2

Sunrise: 6:21am
Sunset: 7:54pm
Moonrise: 9:49pm
Moonset: 11:05am
3

Sunrise: 6:23am
Sunset: 7:51pm
Moonrise: 10:25pm
Moonset: 12:21pm
4

Sunrise: 6:24am
Sunset: 7:49pm
Moonrise: 11:06pm
Moonset: 1:32pm
5

Sunrise: 6:26am
Sunset: 7:47pm
Moonrise: 11:52pm
Moonset: 2:37pm
6

Sunrise: 6:27am
Sunset: 7:45pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 3:35pm
7

Sunrise: 6:29am
Sunset: 7:42pm
Moonrise: 12:43am
Moonset: 4:24pm
8

Sunrise: 6:30am
Sunset: 7:40pm
Moonrise: 1:39am
Moonset: 5:06pm
9

Sunrise: 6:32am
Sunset: 7:38pm
Moonrise: 2:38am
Moonset: 5:42pm
10

Sunrise: 6:34am
Sunset: 7:36pm
Moonrise: 3:39am
Moonset: 6:12pm
11

Sunrise: 6:35am
Sunset: 7:33pm
Moonrise: 4:41am
Moonset: 6:40pm
12

Sunrise: 6:37am
Sunset: 7:31pm
Moonrise: 5:43am
Moonset: 7:04pm
13

Sunrise: 6:38am
Sunset: 7:29pm
Moonrise: 6:46am
Moonset: 7:28pm
14

Sunrise: 6:40am
Sunset: 7:27pm
Moonrise: 7:47am
Moonset: 7:51pm
15

Sunrise: 6:41am
Sunset: 7:24pm
Moonrise: 8:49am
Moonset: 8:15pm
16

Sunrise: 6:43am
Sunset: 7:22pm
Moonrise: 9:51am
Moonset: 8:40pm
17

Sunrise: 6:45am
Sunset: 7:20pm
Moonrise: 10:53am
Moonset: 9:08pm
18

Sunrise: 6:46am
Sunset: 7:17pm
Moonrise: 11:54am
Moonset: 9:40pm
19

Sunrise: 6:48am
Sunset: 7:15pm
Moonrise: 12:55pm
Moonset: 10:17pm
20

Sunrise: 6:49am
Sunset: 7:13pm
Moonrise: 1:53pm
Moonset: 11:01pm
21

Sunrise: 6:51am
Sunset: 7:11pm
Moonrise: 2:48pm
Moonset: 11:53pm
22

Sunrise: 6:52am
Sunset: 7:08pm
Moonrise: 3:38pm
Moonset: none
23

Sunrise: 6:54am
Sunset: 7:06pm
Moonrise: 4:23pm
Moonset: 12:53am
24

Sunrise: 6:56am
Sunset: 7:04pm
Moonrise: 5:02pm
Moonset: 2:01am
25

Sunrise: 6:57am
Sunset: 7:01pm
Moonrise: 5:38pm
Moonset: 3:15am
26

Sunrise: 6:59am
Sunset: 6:59pm
Moonrise: 6:10pm
Moonset: 4:33am
27

Sunrise: 7:00am
Sunset: 6:57pm
Moonrise: 6:41pm
Moonset: 5:54am
28

Sunrise: 7:02am
Sunset: 6:55pm
Moonrise: 7:12pm
Moonset: 7:16am
29

Sunrise: 7:04am
Sunset: 6:52pm
Moonrise: 7:45pm
Moonset: 8:37am
30

Sunrise: 7:05am
Sunset: 6:50pm
Moonrise: 8:20pm
Moonset: 9:57am

October 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 7:07am
Sunset: 6:48pm
Moonrise: 9:00pm
Moonset: 11:14am
2

Sunrise: 7:08am
Sunset: 6:45pm
Moonrise: 9:46pm
Moonset: 12:24pm
3

Sunrise: 7:10am
Sunset: 6:43pm
Moonrise: 10:36pm
Moonset: 1:27pm
4

Sunrise: 7:12am
Sunset: 6:41pm
Moonrise: 11:32pm
Moonset: 2:20pm
5

Sunrise: 7:13am
Sunset: 6:39pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 3:06pm
6

Sunrise: 7:15am
Sunset: 6:37pm
Moonrise: 12:31am
Moonset: 3:44pm
7

Sunrise: 7:16am
Sunset: 6:34pm
Moonrise: 1:32am
Moonset: 4:16pm
8

Sunrise: 7:18am
Sunset: 6:32pm
Moonrise: 2:34am
Moonset: 4:44pm
9

Sunrise: 7:20am
Sunset: 6:30pm
Moonrise: 3:36am
Moonset: 5:09pm
10

Sunrise: 7:21am
Sunset: 6:28pm
Moonrise: 4:38am
Moonset: 5:33pm
11

Sunrise: 7:23am
Sunset: 6:25pm
Moonrise: 5:40am
Moonset: 5:56pm
12

Sunrise: 7:25am
Sunset: 6:23pm
Moonrise: 6:42am
Moonset: 6:20pm
13

Sunrise: 7:26am
Sunset: 6:21pm
Moonrise: 7:44am
Moonset: 6:44pm
14

Sunrise: 7:28am
Sunset: 6:19pm
Moonrise: 8:46am
Moonset: 7:11pm
15

Sunrise: 7:30am
Sunset: 6:17pm
Moonrise: 9:48am
Moonset: 7:42pm
16

Sunrise: 7:31am
Sunset: 6:15pm
Moonrise: 10:49am
Moonset: 8:17pm
17

Sunrise: 7:33am
Sunset: 6:13pm
Moonrise: 11:47am
Moonset: 8:58pm
18

Sunrise: 7:35am
Sunset: 6:11pm
Moonrise: 12:43pm
Moonset: 9:47pm
19

Sunrise: 7:36am
Sunset: 6:08pm
Moonrise: 1:33pm
Moonset: 10:43pm
20

Sunrise: 7:38am
Sunset: 6:06pm
Moonrise: 2:19pm
Moonset: 11:46pm
21

Sunrise: 7:40am
Sunset: 6:04pm
Moonrise: 2:59pm
Moonset: none
22

Sunrise: 7:42am
Sunset: 6:02pm
Moonrise: 3:35pm
Moonset: 12:55am
23

Sunrise: 7:43am
Sunset: 6:00pm
Moonrise: 4:07pm
Moonset: 2:08am
24

Sunrise: 7:45am
Sunset: 5:58pm
Moonrise: 4:38pm
Moonset: 3:25am
25 DST Ends


Sunrise: 6:47am
Sunset: 4:56pm
Moonrise: 4:08pm
Moonset: 3:45am

26

Sunrise: 6:48am
Sunset: 4:54pm
Moonrise: 4:39pm
Moonset: 5:06am
27

Sunrise: 6:50am
Sunset: 4:52pm
Moonrise: 5:13pm
Moonset: 6:27am
28

Sunrise: 6:52am
Sunset: 4:51pm
Moonrise: 5:51pm
Moonset: 7:46am
29

Sunrise: 6:54am
Sunset: 4:49pm
Moonrise: 6:34pm
Moonset: 9:02am
30

Sunrise: 6:55am
Sunset: 4:47pm
Moonrise: 7:24pm
Moonset: 10:11am
31

Sunrise: 6:57am
Sunset: 4:45pm
Moonrise: 8:19pm
Moonset: 11:11am

November 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 6:59am
Sunset: 4:43pm
Moonrise: 9:19pm
Moonset: 12:01pm
2

Sunrise: 7:01am
Sunset: 4:41pm
Moonrise: 10:21pm
Moonset: 12:43pm
3

Sunrise: 7:02am
Sunset: 4:40pm
Moonrise: 11:24pm
Moonset: 1:18pm
4

Sunrise: 7:04am
Sunset: 4:38pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 1:48pm
5

Sunrise: 7:06am
Sunset: 4:36pm
Moonrise: 12:27am
Moonset: 2:14pm
6

Sunrise: 7:07am
Sunset: 4:34pm
Moonrise: 1:29am
Moonset: 2:38pm
7

Sunrise: 7:09am
Sunset: 4:33pm
Moonrise: 2:31am
Moonset: 3:01pm
8

Sunrise: 7:11am
Sunset: 4:31pm
Moonrise: 3:33am
Moonset: 3:24pm
9

Sunrise: 7:13am
Sunset: 4:29pm
Moonrise: 4:35am
Moonset: 3:48pm
10

Sunrise: 7:14am
Sunset: 4:28pm
Moonrise: 5:38am
Moonset: 4:14pm
11

Sunrise: 7:16am
Sunset: 4:26pm
Moonrise: 6:40am
Moonset: 4:43pm
12

Sunrise: 7:18am
Sunset: 4:25pm
Moonrise: 7:42am
Moonset: 5:17pm
13

Sunrise: 7:20am
Sunset: 4:23pm
Moonrise: 8:42am
Moonset: 5:57pm
14

Sunrise: 7:21am
Sunset: 4:22pm
Moonrise: 9:39am
Moonset: 6:43pm
15

Sunrise: 7:23am
Sunset: 4:21pm
Moonrise: 10:32am
Moonset: 7:37pm
16

Sunrise: 7:25am
Sunset: 4:19pm
Moonrise: 11:18am
Moonset: 8:37pm
17

Sunrise: 7:26am
Sunset: 4:18pm
Moonrise: 12:00pm
Moonset: 9:44pm
18

Sunrise: 7:28am
Sunset: 4:17pm
Moonrise: 12:36pm
Moonset: 10:54pm
19

Sunrise: 7:30am
Sunset: 4:15pm
Moonrise: 1:08pm
Moonset: none
20

Sunrise: 7:31am
Sunset: 4:14pm
Moonrise: 1:38pm
Moonset: 12:08am
21

Sunrise: 7:33am
Sunset: 4:13pm
Moonrise: 2:07pm
Moonset: 1:23am
22

Sunrise: 7:35am
Sunset: 4:12pm
Moonrise: 2:37pm
Moonset: 2:41am
23

Sunrise: 7:36am
Sunset: 4:11pm
Moonrise: 3:08pm
Moonset: 3:59am
24

Sunrise: 7:38am
Sunset: 4:10pm
Moonrise: 3:43pm
Moonset: 5:18am
25

Sunrise: 7:39am
Sunset: 4:09pm
Moonrise: 4:22pm
Moonset: 6:35am
26

Sunrise: 7:41am
Sunset: 4:08pm
Moonrise: 5:09pm
Moonset: 7:48am
27

Sunrise: 7:42am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 6:02pm
Moonset: 8:54am
28

Sunrise: 7:44am
Sunset: 4:06pm
Moonrise: 7:00pm
Moonset: 9:51am
29

Sunrise: 7:45am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 8:03pm
Moonset: 10:38am
30

Sunrise: 7:47am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 9:08pm
Moonset: 11:17am

December 2015
Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 7:48am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 10:12pm
Moonset: 11:49am
2

Sunrise: 7:50am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: 11:16pm
Moonset: 12:17pm
3

Sunrise: 7:51am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 12:43pm
4

Sunrise: 7:52am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 12:19am
Moonset: 1:06pm
5

Sunrise: 7:53am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 1:21am
Moonset: 1:29pm
6

Sunrise: 7:55am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 2:23am
Moonset: 1:52pm
7

Sunrise: 7:56am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 3:26am
Moonset: 2:17pm
8

Sunrise: 7:57am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 4:28am
Moonset: 2:45pm
9

Sunrise: 7:58am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 5:31am
Moonset: 3:16pm
10

Sunrise: 7:59am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 6:33am
Moonset: 3:53pm
11

Sunrise: 8:00am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 7:32am
Moonset: 4:37pm
12

Sunrise: 8:01am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 8:27am
Moonset: 5:29pm
13

Sunrise: 8:02am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 9:17am
Moonset: 6:29pm
14

Sunrise: 8:03am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 10:01am
Moonset: 7:34pm
15

Sunrise: 8:04am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 10:39am
Moonset: 8:44pm
16

Sunrise: 8:05am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 11:13am
Moonset: 9:57pm
17

Sunrise: 8:06am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 11:43am
Moonset: 11:11pm
18

Sunrise: 8:07am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 12:12pm
Moonset: none
19

Sunrise: 8:07am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 12:40pm
Moonset: 12:26am
20

Sunrise: 8:08am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 1:09pm
Moonset: 1:42am
21

Sunrise: 8:09am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 1:41pm
Moonset: 2:58am
22

Sunrise: 8:09am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 2:17pm
Moonset: 4:14am
23

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 2:59pm
Moonset: 5:27am
24

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: 3:47pm
Moonset: 6:35am
25

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 4:43pm
Moonset: 7:36am
26

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 5:44pm
Moonset: 8:28am
27

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 6:48pm
Moonset: 9:12am
28

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:06pm
Moonrise: 7:54pm
Moonset: 9:48am
29

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 8:59pm
Moonset: 10:19am
30

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 10:03pm
Moonset: 10:45am
31

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:08pm
Moonrise: 11:06pm
Moonset: 11:10am

Stonehenge Sunrise and Sunset Times 2015 (Sunrise Sunset Calendar)

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NEW THEORY: Stonehenge’s tallest stone ‘points at winter sunrise’

22 04 2015

The tallest stone at Stonehenge points towards the sunrise on the midwinter solstice, according to a new theory from an English Heritage steward.

Aerial photograph of Stonehenge
The newly observed alignment (red line) is at 80 degrees to the line of the axis of the monument (blue line)

Historians have long known the circle of stones is aligned with the midsummer sunrise but Tim Daw says the tallest one is lined up with the midwinter sun.

It was previously thought the stone had been put back at the wrong angle when it was re-erected in 1901.

But Mr Daw, who works there, says his research shows its angle is deliberate.

‘Botched job’

Mr Daw said: “The largest stone at Stonehenge is not where it ‘should’ be, it is twisted.

“This stone, Stone 56, is the tallest one at the end of the inner horseshoe of sarsen stones.

“Because it was put back to the vertical in 1901 it has been assumed that the twist is the result of the modern excavators botching the job.

Drawing of Stonehenge prior to 1901
The tallest stone in the monument was straightened in 1901

“My research shows that not only was the standing stone out of symmetry with the central solstice alignment originally, but that its now fallen partner had also been, and so were surrounding stones, including the Altar Stone.”

Mr Daw, who last year came up with evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete, said his newly discovered alignment was at 80 degrees to the line of the axis of the monument, which points to midsummer solstice sunrise and midwinter sunset.

‘100 tonnes of stone’

“The stones point to the midwinter solstice sunrise and midsummer sunset,” he said.

“This alignment had been missed by previous investigators… as they used an idealised plan rather than an actual plan for their calculations.”

“This isn’t some nebulous sighting line on a distant star; this is 100 tonnes of stone deliberately pointing to the major event at the other end of the day the rest of the monument celebrates.

“One stone out of line might be a coincidence but that it is five of the major stones, at least, shows it was a designed feature.

“It shows what can be discovered by simple observation even in such a well-researched site as Stonehenge.”

Stonehenge
Tim Daw said the tallest stone (centre) was positioned to align with the midwinter sunrise

Director of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society (WANHS), David Dawson, said: “This is an interesting new idea which highlights the “skew” of the Stonehenge trilithons, which has been known for some time.

“It highlights the significance of the summer and winter solstices at Stonehenge, and the 80 degree angle between them.

“We know that the Bush Barrow lozenge, on display at the Wiltshire Museum, hints at this same significant astronomical feature.

“There will now be a debate between archaeologists and a re-examination of the evidence to test this new hypothesis.”

Jessica Trethowan from English Heritage said it was “an interesting idea”.

Mr Daw’s theory has been published in the latest WANHS magazine.

Midwinter sunrise at Stonehenge
People traditionally gather at Stonehenge for the winter and summer solstices

Read the full story on the BBC News website

The Stonehenge News Blog





First Day of spring: Stonehenge crowd gathers for Equinox sunrise

22 03 2015

The first day of spring has been marked by more than 800 revellers who gathered at Stonehenge to watch the sunrise.

Stonehenge-Spring-Equinox-2015 (54)

Despite a cloudy forecast, @St0nehenge tweeted the gathering had been “blessed with a perfect sunrise”

Druids and pagans were joined by a mass of revellers at the ancient monument to celebrate the spring or vernal equinox.

Open access to the stones was given from first light, 05:45 GMT, by English Heritage which manages the site.

Senior druid King Arthur Pendragon, who performed the sunrise ceremony, said: “We’re lucky, we used to get 200 people but now it’s up to nearly 1,000.”

Despite a cloudy forecast, @St0nehenge tweeted that the gathering had been “blessed with a perfect sunrise”.

“A lot of people are coming out to sacred places to celebrate the turning of the wheel, which is what paganism is about,” said Mr Pendragon.

“We don’t worship nature, we worship the divine through nature and so we worship at the times of the year when it’s auspicious – spring, summer, autumn and winter.”

English Heritage opens the ancient stone circle for the spring equinox as well as the winter and summer solstice

Full article (source) and more images at the BBC website: (Nice to see the BBC’s reference to our twitter account)

Follow us here for all the latest / ongoing Stonehenge news: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

There are many some fantastic images on the Stonehenge Stone Circle Flickr page

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog








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