STONEHENGE CLOSED FROM 19th MARCH DUE TO COVID-19

18 03 2020

English Heritage and The National Trust are both taking drastic action to limit the spread of Covid-19.

Stonehenge

In what would ordinarily be busy tourism season, visitor numbers have slumped due to the Covid-19 virus

Following the latest government recommendations, English Heritage have taken the decision to close Stonehenge and all their staffed historic sites from the end of Wednesday 18th March. They will be reviewing this and will keep you updated. Some sites may be opened earlier and they will let you know if this is the case. They will also need to cancel public events during this period. Visit the English Heritage website for more details.

In an email to its members, Kate Mavor the Chief Executive of English Heritage said:

“Following the latest government recommendations, we have taken the decision to close all our staffed historic sites from the end of Wednesday 18th March until 1st May. We will be reviewing this and will keep you updated. Some sites may be opened earlier and we will let you know if this is the case. We also need to cancel our public events during this period.

Free-to-enter sites will remain open to visitors. These sites have large open spaces in which visitors can maintain social distancing and they are often located in quieter spots away from crowds.

Our first priority is the health and wellbeing of all our Members, visitors, volunteers and staff, and we hope you can understand why we have taken this unprecedented step.

England’s past is full of stories of hope in the face of adversity, and of people coming together to overcome all kinds of challenges.

We look forward to welcoming you at our sites again soon, and we will let you know about our plans for reopening as soon as we are able. Until then, I hope that you and those close to you keep healthy and safe.”

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English Heritage and Stonehenge Ownership.

22 02 2020

In 1915, Sir Cecil Herbert Edward Chubb, resident of Shrewton, went to an auction at the Palace theatre in Salisbury with the intention, as legend would have it, of buying his wife some dining room chairs.

Cecil Chubb

Instead, ‘on a whim’ he paid £6,600 for lot number 15 or for Stonehenge (and 30 acres surrounding it) as most people would know it. In today’s money Chubb would have paid £683,580, which still would have been a steal considering Stonehenge was valued at £51,000,000 in 2010. Thus, Chubb became the last private owner of Stonehenge. As a lover of the area, it has been reported that the ‘whim’ upon which Chubb acted was in fact a benevolent act to keep Stonehenge out of the hands of foreign investors. It seems that this benevolent intention was carried a step further when in 1918, Cecil Chubb handed Stonehenge over to the government and to the people of Britain.  However, perhaps his benevolence was provoked – some reports have it that he first gifted the ancient stones to his wife; she was not best pleased (Perhaps she was expecting her dining room chairs!). Nevertheless, Chubb handed the stones over to government with a number of altruistic conditions, which were:

  1. Local residence must always have free access.

Although today, in the stewardship of the English Heritage, an adult ticket can cost over £20, English Heritage and National trust members enter for free – so a local resident could still enter the site free of charge and help with the upkeep of the precious monument.chubb-stonehenge

If Cecil Chubb was the last private owner of Stonehenge, who came before him? The estate of Amesbury which included Stonehenge and its surroundings, was in the possession of the royalty from around 899 A.D, during the reign of Alfred the Great. In royal possession it remained until the 12th century when it became a token of royal gratitude and was granted to favoured royal subjects, such as the Earls of Salisbury and later the Earls of Warwick. The omnipresent Henry VIII gifted the 200,000 acre estate to Sir Edward Seymour and it remained in his family and the families of his descendants  until  the land passed in 1778 with the attached dukedom to Archibald Douglas, (at this point hardy related to Seymour), who sold it to Sir Edmund Atrobus. Through inheritance the land eventually made it way into the ownership his namesake Sir Edmund Antrobus, the penultimate private owner of the stones and the first to charge admission – his right to do so confirmed by the High Court in 1905. Tragically, Edmund’s son and heir was killed in the great war and when Edmund died his estate was inherited by his brother who immediately decided to unload it.  Crucially, the sale was handled by Knight, Frank and Rutley who in 1915 put it on lot 15 at that auspicious auction in Salisbury.

On the 26th October 1918, Cecil Chubb handed the stones to the government of the United Kingdom. Ever since, English Heritage have looked after the stones, with the surrounding land being owned by The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, a.k.a the National Trust. The benevolent act of Cecil Chubb may have handed the stones to the people of Britain, but it is the hard work of English Heritage that maintains the iconic monument today and will preserve its wonder for generations to come.

Relevant links:

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Faces of the past at Stonehenge over half term holiday. Make a day of it in Wiltshire.

15 02 2020

Visit Stonehenge this half term and come face-to-face with prehistoric people.

faces

Explore forensic archaeology this Half-Term at Stonehenge!

English Heritage experts how will show visitors how to use archaeological evidence and modelling clay to find out what their ancestors looked like thousands of years ago.

Visitors can have a go themselves and then take a look around the exhibition.

There is lots more to discover about the pre-historic site and what everyday life was like for the people of Stonehenge, in the galleries and Neolithic houses which are filled with replica stone age axes and tools, pottery, clothes and other objects.

Put yourself in the picture with Stonehenge’s new selfie wall in the exhibition everyone is talking about Your Stonehenge – 150 Years of personal photos.

People have been visiting Stonehenge for millennia and this special exhibition records day trips and memories from just the last 150 years.

The facial reconstruction workshops are for everyone to enjoy and are included in the price of admission.

The events run from today until Sunday, February 23, 10am to 4pm.
Vist the English Heritage webiste for full details

Special Offer: Buy a ticket for Salisbury Museum and/or Wiltshire Museum when you purchase your Stonehenge ticket from our website and you’ll get 25% off their ticket price! Make a day of it in Wiltshire!

Whats on in Wiltshire this half term – Vist Wiltshire

Source: Salisbury Journal

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Stonehenge Winter Solstice Open Access Arrangements 2019

7 12 2019

Winter Solstice Open Access: Everything you need to know

On December 22nd 2019, to celebrate the winter solstice, Stonehenge’s inner circle is open to the public for one of only four times a year! The Stones were originally constructed in conjunction with the solar calendar – there could hardly be a more important time to be at the ancient landmark. Today, visitors from all over the world congregate to enjoy the event and English heritages policy of open access allows everyone, for this very special occasion, into the inner circle of Stonehenge, to enjoy the sunrise and interact with the monument. To ensure you have the best experience possible, we have collated all the vital information about this year’s event:

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English Heritage is looking forward to welcoming people to Stonehenge to celebrate Winter Solstice on Sunday 22nd December.  Visitors will be able to access the monument as soon as it is light enough to do so safely.  Please read the information below before planning your visit. Please visit the English Heritage website for further details

  • DATE AND TIMES

Sunday 22nd December 2019

Stonehenge Respect

RESPECT THE STONES AND EACH OTHER! Click here

The following timings are subject to change. Please do check back nearer the time for the confirmed schedule.

6am: Limited car parking opens
7.45am (approximately depending on light levels): Monument field opens
8.11am: Sunrise
10am: Monument field closes 

Please Note: Due to a ‘Temporary Traffic Restriction Order’ (TTRO) By-ways 11 and 12 will be closed over the Solstice period (18th -23rd December) 

What is the solstice?

Throughout the winter solstice, the earth’s axis is tilted at its furthest point from the sun. In the UK, the sun is at its lowest point in the sky. It is both the shortest day of the year and the longest night. Visitors gather to see the sunrise above the stones – an event celebrated at this time of year for thousands of years, there could hardly be a more ideal time to be amidst the sacred monoliths. Entry is completely free!

When Exactly is the Solstice?

The exact time of the Solstice on the 22nd December is 4.19 am. Open access begins at 7:45am and ends at 10:00am. This should give you plenty of time to enjoy the sunrise, appreciate the stones and meet some interesting new people, speaking of which…

Who celebrates the Solstice?

Anyone is welcome to celebrate the winter solstice and as a result it always draws a diverse and friendly crowd. It is an important spiritual occasion for some groups – so you can join a congregation of today’s druid community, including neo-druids, neo-pagans and wiccans – as well as sightseers from all over the globe.

How do you get to the Solstice?

It is possible to drive yourself to the Stones, parking costs £5 or £2 for motorbikes (Stonehenge’s postcode is SP4 7DE for your sat-nav). However, there is no guarantee – once the car park is full there is very little you will be able to do. Luckily, Salisbury Reds is running shuttle bus service, which could relieve you of a potential parking nightmare. The 333 service will run between 6.00am and 6.50am from Salisbury New Canal– with buses returning from Stonehenge between 9.15am and 10.15 am.

The service will also stop at Salisbury Railway Station and Salisbury Street in Amesbury.

Special buses planned for Stonehenge during Winter Solstice – CLICK HERE

PLANNING YOUR JOURNEY

Parking for Winter Solstice is very limited and we cannot guarantee that there will be space in the two Winter Solstice car parks. We strongly recommend car sharing or using public transport.

  • Travel by Bus – Salisbury Reds buses will be running from 6am from Salisbury via Amesbury.

    Organised Tours – If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Solstice celebrations you can join an organised tour.  Use a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions.  Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company and offer guided tours and transport from London. Solstice Events offer small group Winter  Solstice Tours from Bath using local expert guides.

What should you bring to the Solstice?

The most important thing to remember is that it will likely be very cold and potentially wet! Warm clothing and sensible footwear, a pair of wellies for instance, are essential, last years solstice reached lows of 5 degrees C. Glass, drones, tents and pets (with the exception of guide dogs) are all strictly prohibited.

Ultimately, there really isn’t much you need to bring to enjoy this special occasion – a sense of adventure, a smile and a warm jacket will ensure that you have a wonderful experience. And so for all those venturing to Wiltshire’s finest historical site for this magical, midwinter day, I wish you all the very best!

Access to Stonehenge for Winter Solstice is free and is subject to the Conditions of Entry. Please read these before deciding whether to attend.  Stonehenge is in a field on Salisbury Plain and the weather in December will be cold and wet.  Even if it isn’t raining, the ground will be wet from the dew and there may also be frost. Sensible footwear and warm, waterproof clothing is essential. Please note, parking charges apply

Stonehenge Winter Solstice Links:
What has Stonehenge got to do with the winter solstice? click here
Celebrate Winter Solstice at Stonehenge – Click here
Stonehenge, the Winter Solstice, and the Druids – Click here
Winter solstice 2020: Why do pagans celebrate the shortest day of the year? click here
Special buses planned for Stonehenge during Winter Solstice – CLICK HERE
Respecting the Stones.  Managed Open Access – Click here
Solstice at Stonehenge. From Past to Present. – click here
English Heritage Conditions of Entry – click here

Please help us to create a peaceful occasion by taking personal responsibility and following the Conditions of Entry and guidelines

For traffic, weather and other updates on the morning of the winter solstice, Follow @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @VisitStonehenge @HighwaysEngland @VisitWiltshire @DruidKingArthur @Wiltshirepolice for #WinterSolstice2019

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE STONEHENGE BROADCAST

The Stonehenge News Blog
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Celebrate the stars above Stonehenge this half-term.

11 10 2019

Enjoy a closer look at the relationship between Stonehenge and the skies above the monument this October half term with moon filled family fun.

MOON MAYHEM AT HALF-TERMStonehenge Full Moon

Running throughout the day at the Stonehenge visitor centre, this drop-in activity explores our long held fascination with the moon in a lively show that covers everything from werewolves to Galileo, and from H G Wells to Neil Armstrong – with a lot of fast-paced costume changes.

Families of all ages will enjoy this two-man show, taking place at the Stonehenge visitor centre.

This season of celestial themed events marks the anniversary of the moon landing and the launch of SkyScape,

Saturday 26th October – Sunday 3rd November
No booking required for Moon Mayhem, although advance booking for Stonehenge admission tickets is recommended.  Visit the English Heritage website for full details

Can’t make it to Stonehenge this half term?  You can still soak up the atmosphere thanks to Skyscape, a new feed of the sky above the Stones.  Skygazers from all over the world can experience sunrise over the ancient monument , and see the journey of the moon and stars from within the stone circle any time of the day or night by visiting www.Stonehengeskyscape.co.uk

STONEHENGE AND AVEBURY WORLD HERITAGE SITE, AND ITS ASTRONOMICAL IMPORTANCE: 20th NOVEMBER 2019 – Click here
More English Heritage Stonehenge Events – click here
National Trust Stonehenge Landscape Events – Click here
Guided Tours of Stonehenge from London, Bath and Salisbury – Click here
Solar Astronomy at Stonehenge Blog – Click here

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Stonehenge Autumn Equinox Open Access Arrangements: 23rd September 2019

8 09 2019

THE Autumn Equinox is rapidly approaching as the last days of summer slowly come to an end. English Heritage are expected to offer a short period of access, from first light or safe enough to enter the monument field (approximately 06.30am) until 08:30am on the 23rd September this year.

The Autumn Equinox (Mabon)
The 2019 Autumn Equinox is at 08.50 GMT on the September 23rd
Sunrise will be 6.55am

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Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

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What is the Equinox?

The equinox is when day and night are actually the same length. It happens several days before the spring equinox, and a few days after the autumn one.

The reason day and night are only almost equal on the equinox is because the sun looks like a disk in the sky, so the top half rises above the horizon before the centre, according to the Met Office.

The Earth’s atmosphere also refracts the sunlight, so it seems to rise before its centre reaches the horizon. This causes the sun to provide more daylight than many people might expect, offering 12 hours and 10 minutes on the equinox.

The word ‘equinox’ itself actually mean ‘equal’ (equi) and ‘night’ (nox).

Respecting the Stones
The conditions of entry for the Managed Open Access.  Click here

If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Autumn Equinox and do not have transport you can join a specialist organised small group tour.  Use a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions of entry.  Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company offering award winning discreet tours from London and Bath – click here for their exclusive Autumn Equinox tour. Solstice Events offer small group sunrise tours using only local expert guides.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for Equinox updates and Stonehenge news
The Stonehenge News Blog





Stonehenge Summer Solstice Open Access 2019

20 05 2019

Stonehenge is an ancient prehistoric world heritage site which has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Summer Solstice for thousands of years. Stonehenge is a world renowned historic Monument and part of a World Heritage Site. It is seen by many who attend as a sacred place.  

Summer Solstice Sunrise Celebrations at Stonehenge

Summer Solstice Sunrise Celebrations at Stonehenge

Please note that last normal admissions to Stonehenge is on Thursday 20th June at 13:00 and the site will close at 15:00 in preparation for Summer Solstice Managed Open Access. Stonehenge will re-open for normal admissions on the afternoon of Friday 21et June. Please check our social media channels for the exact time.

English Heritage is pleased to provide free Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for Summer Solstice. We ask that if you are planning to join us for this peaceful and special occasion that you read the Conditions of Entry and the information provided on the following pages before deciding whether to come.

Stonehenge is a significant World Heritage Site and to many it is sacred – please respect the stones and all those who are attending.

Admission to the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge is free of charge.  We hope the weather will be kind and wish you a peaceful and celebratory solstice.

THURSDAY 20th JUNE 2019  
SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS 19.00 hours
ACCESS TO STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD 19.00 hours
SUNSET 21.26 hours
FRIDAY 21st JUNE 2019  
SUNRISE 04.52 hours
LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK 06.00 hours (or when full)
STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD CLOSES

SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED

08.00 hours

12.00 hours (Noon)

For further information about Managed Open Access for Summer Solstice at Stonehenge, please call English Heriage Customer Services Solstice Information Hotline on 0370 333 1181.

RELEVANT LINKS:
Summer Solstice at Stonehenge. From Past to Present. Stonehenge New Blog
Why Thousands Of Pagans Gather At Stonehenge For The Solstice Stonehenge News Blog
Respect the Stones: Stonehenge News Blog

The Stonehenge News Blog
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http://www.Stonehenge.News








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