2018 Moon Phases for Stonehenge. #FullMoon #Calendar

14 01 2018

Ancient peoples had the benefit of dark skies and experienced the full spectacle of the starry heavens. The Moon gave light at night and would have been particularly useful in the two weeks centred on full Moon. The regular monthly cycle of lunar phases provided a convenient measure of time, upon which many ancient calendars were based.

Was it a Neolithic calendar? A solar temple? A lunar observatory? A calculating device for predicting eclipses? Or perhaps a combination of more than one of these? In recent years
Stonehenge has become the very icon of ancient astronomy, featuring in nearly every discussion on the subject.
A more informed picture has been obtained in recent years by combining evidence from archaeology and astronomy within the new interdiscipline of archaeoastronomy – the
study of beliefs and practices concerning the sky in the past and the uses to which people’s knowledge of the skies were put.

Lunation New Moon First Quarter Full Moon Third Quarter Duration
1175 2 Jan 02:24 8 Jan 22:25 29d 19h 47m
1176 17 Jan 02:17 24 Jan 22:20 31 Jan 13:26 7 Feb 15:53 29d 18h 48m
1177 15 Feb 21:05 23 Feb 08:09 2 Mar 00:51 9 Mar 11:19 29d 16h 06m
1178 17 Mar 13:11 24 Mar 15:35 31 Mar 13:36 8 Apr 08:17 29d 12h 46m
1179 16 Apr 02:57 22 Apr 22:45 30 Apr 01:58 8 May 03:08 29d 9h 51m
1180 15 May 12:47 22 May 04:49 29 May 15:19 6 Jun 19:31 29d 7h 55m
1181 13 Jun 20:43 20 Jun 11:50 28 Jun 05:53 6 Jul 08:50 29d 7h 05m
1182 13 Jul 03:47 19 Jul 20:52 27 Jul 21:20 4 Aug 19:17 29d 7h 10m
1183 11 Aug 10:57 18 Aug 08:48 26 Aug 12:56 3 Sep 03:37 29d 8h 04m
1184 9 Sep 19:01 17 Sep 00:14 25 Sep 03:52 2 Oct 10:45 29d 9h 45m
1185 9 Oct 04:46 16 Oct 19:01 24 Oct 17:45 31 Oct 16:40 29d 12h 15m
1186 7 Nov 16:01 15 Nov 14:54 23 Nov 05:39 30 Nov 00:18 29d 15h 18m
1187 7 Dec 07:20 15 Dec 11:49 22 Dec 17:48 29 Dec 09:34 29d 18h 08m
* All times are local time for Stonehenge. Dates are based on the Gregorian calendar.
Source: Time and Date

Stonehenge Links:

Astro Moon Calendar shows phases of the Moon each day, astronomical events and astrological forecast for the year.
Stonehenge and other stone monuments were probably used for special moonlit ceremonies.
Stonehenge and Ancient Astronomy. Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site
Stonehenge Full Moon Guided Walking Tours.  Explore the landscape with a local historian and astronomer.
All eyes on the sky! We’ll see a supermoon, blue Moon, and blood Moon all in one night!
How to see the super blue moon, a cosmic event you won’t want to miss

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for daily Stonehenge Sunset / Sunrise / Moonrise / Moonset times.


2018 Stonehenge Opening Hours, Entry Prices and Tickets.

13 01 2018

Stonehenge Opening Times and Entrance Prices.
English Heritage advise to expect a visit to last around two hours. Please see the table below for opening times for 2018, with some seasonal variability, and entrance prices for adults, children, families, seniors and groups.


The English Heriatge Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre

The English Heritage Visitor Centre at Stonehenge is located 2 kilometers from the monument. This is your entry point to Stonehenge and the place where you pick up your tickets, souvenir guides and optional audio guides. The new Visitor Centre also offers a modern exhibition with prehistoric objects on display, and a spacious café and gift shop. A Stonehenge shuttle transports you between the Visitor Centre and Stonehenge (included in your ticket price).

If you come by car you will park in the car park outside the visitor centre. It is free for people purchasing tickets to enter Stonehenge, there is a charge if you are not. Tour buses have their own separate coach park.

All Members of English Heritage or National Trust must show a valid membership card on arrival to be granted free parking and site access.

To enter the Stonehenge Exhibition at the Visitor Centre you need a full ticket to Stonehenge, anyone can access the café, gift shop and toilets though, for free.

Very Important!  Book Your Stonehenge Tickets in Advance 
To be assured of entering Stonehenge the best way is to reserve timed tickets in advance on the English Heritage web site or if you need more flexibility and without the time constraint you can purchase discount advance Stonehenge tickets here

Tickets to Stonehenge are booked by half hour time slot, the website showing you how many tickets are still available for your chosen date and time.

Note: you cannot reserve tickets on-line on the day of your visit, you must reserve before midnight latest on the day before. Only a very small number of tickets are held back each day for walk-up visitors.

Note: the last admission time is two hours before closing time of Stonehenge. Closing times are variable according to month of the year (see below)

Stonehenge Admission & Opening From 1st January 2018 – October 2018


Opening Times



16 Mar – 31 May

09.30 – 19:00

Child (5-15)


1 Jun – 31 Aug

09.00 – 20:00

Students/Seniors *


1 Sep – 15 Oct

09.30 – 19:00

Family Ticket †


16 Oct – 15 Mar

09.30 – 17:00

Last entry 2 hours before closing
Members of the National Trust & English Heritage enter free
Prices are valid until 31st March 2018* 16-18 yr olds + seniors 60+† 2 Adults and 3 Children~ Closed 24th to 26th December

2018 STONEHENGE OPENING TIMES (Last entry 2 hours before closing)

1st JANUARY 2018 – 31st MARCH 2018

Monday 9:30 – 17:00
Tuesday 9:30 – 17:00
Wednesday 9:30 – 17:00
Thursday 9:30 – 17:00
Friday 9:30 – 17:00
Saturday 9:30 – 17:00
Sunday 9:30 – 17:00

1st APRIL 2018 – 31st MAY 2018

Monday 9:30 – 19:00
Tuesday 9:30 – 19:00
Wednesday 9:30 – 19:00
Thursday 9:30 – 19:00
Friday 9:30 – 19:00
Saturday 9:30 – 19:00
Sunday 9:30 – 19:00

1st JUNE 2019 – 31st AUGUST 2018

Monday 9:00 – 20:00
Tuesday 9:00 – 20:00
Wednesday 9:00 – 20:00
Thursday 9:00 – 20:00
Friday 9:00 – 20:00
Saturday 9:00 – 20:00
Sunday 9:00 – 20:00

1st SEPTEMBER 2018 – 15th OCTOBER 2018

Monday 9:30 – 19:00
Tuesday 9:30 – 19:00
Wednesday 9:30 – 19:00
Thursday 9:30 – 19:00
Friday 9:30 – 19:00
Saturday 9:30 – 19:00
Sunday 9:30 – 19:00

Opening times will be available nearer the time

For more information please visit the official English Heritage website.  If you are looking to book a tour of Stonehenge, we recommend using Stonehenge Guided Tours

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Events are planned throughout 2018 to mark Stonehenge’s special anniversary.

6 01 2018

A series of English Heritage exhibitions and archaeology projects will be run from March to celebrate the centenary year of Stonehenge being donated to the nation.

2018 is an important anniversary for Stonehenge. A hundred years ago, in 1918, local barrister Cecil Chubb and his wife Mary gifted it to the nation. This public spirited decision marked a turning point in the history of Stonehenge and its fortunes.

A programme of restoration began almost immediately, starting a centenary of care and conservation at Stonehenge which continues to this day.

Once a supposed gift for a wife we, as the public, have now had access to one of the most famous prehistoric monuments for around 100 years.

Stonehenge was donated by Cecil Chubb and his wife Maryin 1918 so that they could be properly looked after and enjoyed by all.

Cecil bought the stones in an auction in 1915 and it’s been said that the only reason he was there at the auction was to buy a set of dining chairs!

Legend has it that he bought it for his wife but she was not happy about…

Late in 1918, Cecil and Mary, gave the stones away to be cared for The Office of Works (what would be English Heritage).

Throughout 2018, English Heritags will be celebrating the centenary of the gift, and discovering what this iconic monument means to people today.

They were in a ‘perlilous condition’ according to the charity, so they set to work to restore it to it’s former glory.

For the past 100 years, millions of people have visited the monument from locals to people travelling thousands of miles to see it.


The first monument was an early henge monument, built about 5,000 years ago, and the unique stone circle was erected in the late Neolithic period about 2500 BC.

In the early Bronze Age many burial mounds were built nearby.

From 1927, the National Trust began to acquire the land around Stonehenge to preserve it and restore it to grassland.

A new visitors centre was built in 2013 and the byway next to the stones was closed.


Throughout 2018 there will be special programmes to celebrate the centenary, such as a special collaboration with the British Museum featuring an exhibition on the Neolithic and Bronze age items found.

You can see all that’s going on here: www.english-heritage.org.uk
Link source (Spire FM)

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