#Stonehenge – 5 musical tributes.

22 02 2014

The Heritage Journal

Heritage Action and the Heritage Journal, as previously documented, had their beginnings on a web site forum “The Modern Antiquarian“, after the book of the same name written by Julian Cope. Mr Cope is possibly better known for his prime activity as a musician, and yet I don’t recall having had many musically themed entries here on the Journal.

A search on the major music sites for names of ancient monuments brings up a plethora of results, depending upon the monument selected. We decided to start with an obvious one – ‘Stonehenge’. This alone returns over 600 songs on AllMusic.com, with many more on Spotify and YouTube – although the YouTube results are somewhat skewed by videos of festivals, documentaries and travelogues, and duplicate entries. But here are five versions that may, or may not be familiar.

Ylvis – (What’s the Meaning of) Stonehenge (3:55)

This tribute…

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Stonehenge Community Open Days: 20th February and 20th March

13 02 2014

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours

There are still some spaces left for the 20th February and 20th March open days from 12pm -2pm at the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre. These are free events but you must pre book and call 0870 3331183 stating Stonehenge Community Open Days as the event you want to book onto.  You can book up to 4 people and must be a Wiltshire resident.

The Stonehenge Learning and Outreach Group with ourselves, Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, English Heritage Stonehenge open daysWiltshire Museum Devizes,Wessex Archaeology and National Trust will meet this week and share their learning events that are happening too.

Join us for a series of open days for the local community at the new Stonehenge visitor centre, featuring a special tour with Susan Greaney, Senior Properties Historian and Lisa Holmes, Community Projects manager.

Come and find out about the making of the exhibition, the opportunities for local voices to contribute to…

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18th Century William Stukeley book on Stonehenge is now online.

3 02 2014

In 1740, British vicar William Stukeley published Stonehenge, A Temple Restor’d to the British Druids.

In more than 30 illustrations, Stukeley’s book documents the way Stonehenge appeared when he visited it in the early 18th century. The historian was only the 1-stukely-stonehengesecond scholarly investigator (after the 17th-century antiquarian John Aubrey) to take an interest in the site, and the first to publish a comprehensive account of what he found on his visits,  including images of the way that the monument looked in context of the  surrounding farmland.

In maps and vistas, Stukeley tried to capture the layout of the  monument’s stones. Much of his sense of urgency in the task came from  his belief that the stones’ arrangement needed preservation, as the  monument was under constant threat of vandalism and interference. For  example, Aubrey found and documented 20 stones in one area of the monument; a century later, Stukeley found only five remaining.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre: English Heritage current ‘Set in Stone’ exhibition includes an oil portrait of William Stukeley: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/discover/set-in-stone-exhibition

Link: http://tywkiwdbi.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/1740-book-on-stonehenge-now-online.html
Stonehenge area news on twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

The Stonehenge News Blog
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William Stukeley’s 1740 book on Stonehenge now online

2 02 2014

The Heritage Trust

 
Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids by William Stukeley
Harvard University Library
 
Harvard University Library has made available a digitised copy of William Stukeley’s 1740 book, Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids. Printed in London in 1740 the book includes more than 30 illustrations showing how Stonehenge appeared when Stukeley visited it in the early 18th century, along with his theories concerning the monument’s origins and use.
 
 
Prospect of STONEHENGE from the southwest from William Stukeley’s, Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids
Harvard University Library
 

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