Olympic Torch will be at Stonehenge on July 12th 2012

19 05 2012

The Olympic torch procession will pass Stonehenge on July 12 then en route to the opening ceremony of London 2012.

On 22 May it will enter Wiltshire at Trowbridge before travelling to Bradford-on-Avon.Olympic Torch

Day 4 – 22 May

Then on 23 May it will visit Chippenham, Calne, Marlborough, Chiseldon, Wroughton, Royal Wootton Bassett and Swindon.

It will return on 11 July going through Ludgershall, Tidworth, Amesbury, The Winterbournes and Salisbury.

An evening event is planned in Salisbury which civic leaders say will “showcase the city to the world”.

Then on 12 July it will leave Salisbury passing through Wilton, Barford St Martin, Fovant on its route to Weymouth.

London 2012 – One extraordinary year

The journey through Wiltshire is part of a 70-day tour across the UK before the torch arrives at London’s Olympic Stadium for the opening ceremony on 27 July when the last relay runner will transfer it from their torch to the Olympic cauldron.

It will then continue to burn until it is extinguished on the final day of the Games.

Thousands of torchbearers have been recruited for the flame’s journey before the opening ceremony.

Each torchbearer will wear a white and gold uniform which has been designed for the occasion by Adidas.

IMPORTANT: The decision does mean, however, the public will not be able to descend on Stonehenge to see the once-in-a-lifetime moment it is carried around the Neolithic monument.

Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-17375974

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin says “All good for Wiltshire Tourism”
Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





A new dawn at Stonehenge – A Monumental Journey

10 05 2012

An exhibition about the ways in which Stonehenge has been presented and experienced over time -as a place of wonder, religious pilgrimage, tourist curiosity, celebration and protest. Exhibits include information about how the monument will soon be released from the ‘roads triangle’ that currently surrounds it and reconnected with the wider landscape.

Stonehenge: Monumental Journey (9 May – 24 June): For centuries, Stonehenge has been a place of wonder and of religious pilgrimage, of celebration and of protest, of music festivals and of tourist curiosity. This exhibition will show how the monument has been experienced and presented over time and how Stonehenge will soon be freed from the “roads
Link: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/about/news/wellington-arch-reopens/

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ – www.StonehegeTours.com

Merln says “Taking the family on Saturday, heard good reports

The Stonehenge Stone Circle News Blog





‘Supermoon’ Alert: Biggest Full Moon of 2012 Occurs Today over Stonehenge

5 05 2012

Skywatchers take note: The biggest full moon of the year is due to arrive over Stonehenge tonight.

Situated on the edge of Salisbury Plain, the prehistoric ceremonial landscape of Stonehenge occupies a large, sparsely populated area of ancient downland ideal for star gazing and viewing the Supermoon.

Supermoon over Stonehenge

Supermoon over Stonehenge

The moon will officially become full Saturday (May 5th) at 11:35 p.m. EDT. And because this month’s full moon coincides with the moon’s perigee — its closest approach to Earth — it will also be the year’s biggest.

The moon will swing in 221,802 miles (356,955 kilometers) from our planet, offering skywatchers a spectacular view of an extra-big, extra-bright moon, nicknamed a supermoon.

And not only does the moon’s perigee coincide with full moon this month, but this perigee will be the nearest to Earth of any this year, as the distance of the moon’s close approach varies by about 3 percent, according to meteorologist Joe Rao, SPACE.com’s skywatching columnist. This happens because the moon’s orbit is not perfectly circular.

This month’s full moon is due to be about 16 percent brighter than average. In contrast, later this year on Nov. 28, the full moon will coincide with apogee, the moon’s farthest approach, offering a particularly small and dim full moon.

Though the unusual appearance of this month’s full moon may be surprising to some, there’s no reason for alarm, scientists warn. The slight distance difference isn’t enough to cause any earthquakes or extreme tidal effects, experts say.

However, the normal tides around the world will be particularly high and low. At perigee, the moon will exert about 42 percent more tidal force than it will during its next apogee two weeks later, Rao said.

The last supermoon occurred in March 2011.

To view this weekend’s supermoon to best effect, look for it just after it rises or before it sets, when it is close to the horizon. There, you can catch a view of the moon behind buildings or trees, an effect which produces an optical illusion, making the moon seem even larger than it really is.

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com 

 Merlin says “Lets hope the skies are clear – Howllllllllllllll……….”

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle News Blog





Tasteful architecture – CheeseHenge

3 05 2012
Totally crackers … food artist Prudence Staite made Stonehenge out of cheese and biscuits

Food artist Prudence Staite made some of the UKs most iconic landmarks out nothing but FOOD.

Totally crackers … food artist Prudence Staite made Stonehenge out of cheese and biscuits

Caters News Agency

By EMILY FAIRBAIRN
Food artist Prudence Staite, 32, has meticulously hand-crafted some of the  UK’s most iconic landmarks using dairy and other food snacks.

The collection includes a Stonehenge that’s built from chunks of Cheddar, Red  Leicester and Stilton cheeses set on a green salad platter with crackers  forming the perimeter.

Full story – http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4292408/Food-artist-Prudence-Staite-creates-iconic-British-landmarks-out-of-food.html

Merlin says “NEVER has something so cheesy been so brilliant”

Sponsored by The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehenegeTours.com

 





Prehistoric Wiltshire. Sites of Significance

1 05 2012

If you are in doubt about the key role Wiltshire plays in the long history of these Islands, and that it has done so since the time humans first set foot on our soil, this book joins the growing scholarly titles from the excellent ‘heritage; publisher Amberley Publishing will dispel it.

Prehistoric Wilsthire

Prehistoric Wilsthire

This attractive book is the latest in a successful series from the Stroud-based publisher Amberley. (Amongst others, their titles include Prehistoric Gloucestershire by Tim Darvill, and John Aubrey and Stone Circles: Britain’s First Archaeologist by Aubrey Burl.) It is well written by a knowledgeable local archaeologist in a style that is pleasingly free of jargon, and opens with a fitting tribute from Francis Pryor.

As with some other titles in the series, this pocket-sized book is specifically designed as a field guide (at 235 x 165mm it is slightly larger than A5), in this instance describing nearly 50 of the most visible and accessible prehistoric monuments within the county of Wiltshire. The selected sites are grouped by topographic region (the Marlborough Downs, the Vale of Pewsey and so on), the majority situated on the chalk uplands. All the familiar forms of earthwork from causewayed camps and long barrows to round barrow groups and hillforts are covered. Appropriately, they include the monuments of the World Heritage Site centred on Avebury and Stonehenge, but information from the latest fieldwork in those areas ensures up-to-date coverage.

An introductory section provides a brief outline of the conventional sub-divisions of later prehistory (the Mesolithic to the Iron Age). Thereafter, details are offered on how best to reach each site: although there are no maps, National Grid References and useful directions are offered. Some of the sites are on private land and hence the book judiciously warns ‘this guide does not infer rights of way’, deferring to the county’s highway authority for the latest information on footpaths and bridleways. Nonetheless, it describes what can be seen at each site from the best publicly-accessible vantage points. The entries briefly describe the history of investigation at each site and summarize current understanding of its function and date.

The book is beautifully illustrated. The majority of the figures are the author’s own fine colour photographs, although some monochrome archival images are also used where necessary. Arguably the best views are the excellent oblique aerial photographs. Their use as an invaluable aid to comprehension recalls the local tradition pioneered by O. G. S. Crawford and Alexander Keiller in their 1928 work, Wessex from the Air. Evidently, the author enlisted the help of several pilots, employing a range of micro-light and private aircraft to gain the necessary perspective. Because the book focuses on visible sites, most of the subjects are obviously upstanding earthworks. Nonetheless, the photographs include a few soil-marks, crop-marks and excavations to emphasis that even in an area which boasts some of the country’s best-known monuments, many others have been lost from normal view.

It is well known that Wiltshire contains a remarkable number of well-preserved field monuments of various forms, and hence the author is in the enviable position of being able to select the most impressive. Because of the quality and visibility of its ancient monuments, Wiltshire is an ideal region to serve as an introduction for those unfamiliar with prehistoric remains, but equally it is an unceasing source of inspiration for the most experienced archaeologist. The field monuments are complemented by outstanding local museums whose displays reflect the long history of archaeological investigation within the county. Yet, despite the richness of their collections, these museums remain the responsibility of private trusts and societies that constantly struggle to find the necessary resources to conserve and exhibit their assets. It is most commendable, therefore, that Bob Clarke, the author, has written Prehistoric Wiltshire as a personal contribution to the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society’s fund raising effort to re-display the famous Bronze Age gallery at Devizes Museum. There are thus two compelling reasons to buy this excellent book – to guide you to some of the best prehistoric sites in Southern England, and to help display the spectacular objects found in some of those sites.

Sponsored by The Stonehenge Tour Companywww.StonehengeTourscm

Merlin says “Visiting Wiltshire ? Buy this book!”

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website








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