Stonehenge Summer Solstice Celebrations: 2018 Open Access Arrangements.

25 05 2018

English Heritage are pleased to provide free Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for the Summer Solstice 2018 and ask that if you are planning to join the celebrations for this peaceful and special occasion that you follow these Conditions of Entry. These are written to ensure enjoyment and safety for everyone attending summer solstice at Stonehenge.

solstice-2018

Stonehenge is an ancient prehistoric site which has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Summer Solstice for thousands of years.

This important site is seen by many as a sacred site – if you are planning to visit for summer solstice we ask that you please respect the stones and each other.

2018 SOLSTICE DATES AND TIMES

WEDNESDAY 20th JUNE 2018
ACCESS TO MONUMENT FIELD 19:00hrs
SUNSET 21:26hrs

THURSDAY 21st JUNE 2018
SUNRISE 04.52hrs
MONUMENT FIELD CLOSES 08:00hrs

The Solstice Car Park opens at 19:00hrs on 20th June 2018 with last admissions at 06:00hrs (or when full if earlier) on 21st June. The car park will close at 12.00 noon on 21st June.

ADMISSION, PLANNING YOUR JOURNEY AND PARKING
Admission to the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge is free of charge.

We strongly recommend travelling by public transport or arranging to car share with friends. You can also request or offer a lift to Stonehenge by following this link.

COME PREPARED

Stonehenge is in a field on Salisbury Plain and the weather in June can be cold and may be wet and windy. Even if it isn’t raining, the ground will be wet from the dew. There may also be frost.

Please be prepared for a 30 minute walk (in low light or darkness), from the bus drop off and from parking areas to the monument. You are strongly advised to wear warm and waterproof clothing and footwear and bring a torch with you.

Toilets at the Monument Field will only be available once the access period begins. There are no catering facilities in the monument field, however the café at the visitor centre is open for hot drinks and breakfast rolls from 6am.

Please note that there are no other amenities or facilities available to visitors until the Monument Field opens.

Please note to reduce risk to those attending and to the monument itself, alcohol is not allowed in the monument field during summer solstice.

GETTING HERE:

Parking for the Summer Solstice is very limited and English Heritage cannot guarantee that you will be able to park near to Stonehenge. If you are planning to travel by car, wherever you park there may be a 30 minute walk to the Monument. We strongly recommend car sharing or using public transport.

Car Sharing – Request or offer a lift to Solstice at Stonehenge

Travel by bus – Salisbury Reds buses will be running from 06:30 from Salisbury (New Canal, Stop U and Salisbury Rail Station). Check timetable.

Organised Solstice Tours – If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Solstice celebrations you can even join an organised tour.  Use a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions.  Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company and offer guided tours and transport from London and Solstice Events offer small group Summer  Solstice Tours from Bath using local expert guides.

Blue Badge Parking – Blue badge parking is in the visitor centre car park and permits must be booked in advance. There is accessible transport to the monument field from the visitor centre beginning at approximately 6.30am. Permits available from Solstice.Stonehenge@english-heritage.org.uk

As you approach Stonehenge, there will be signs to direct you to the car park – please ensure that you follow these. Please do not arrive early as there is no waiting on the roads in the area and you will be moved on.

Parking may involve a shuttle journey to the visitor centre and wherever you park there may be a 30 minute walk.

  • Cars, private hire minibuses and live-in vehicles £5
  • Motorbikes £2
  • Commercial coaches £100

The car parking charge is designed to encourage people to car share and will help the charity offset  the costs of providing additional staffing and lighting in the car parks.

Please note, car parking charges apply to all users of the Winter Solstice car parks, including Blue Badge holders, and members of English Heritage and National Trust.

Motorists have access to a park and ride shuttle from the off-site solstice car parking to the visitor centre. A shuttle will also be provided between the visitor centre and Stonehenge, however visitors are asked to note that disabled people have priority on this bus and should therefore be prepared for a 30 minute walk, in low light, from parking areas to the monument.

English Heritage cannot guarantee entry to the car parks and recommend coming by public transport as cars will be turned away when the car parks are full.

Please visit the official English Heritage website for full details.

Relevant links:
Respecting the Stones
Salisbury Reds Local Bus Service

English Heritage Conditions of Entry
The Salisbury Reds special solstice shuttle service

Please note parking charges apply.

Further details, and information to help you plan your journey, including details of local accommodation providers, will be published on these pages shortly, along with other helpful advice for summer solstice.

Visiting Stonehenge this year for the 2018 Solstice Celebrations?

Please read this blog:
Respecting the Stones

Follow @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @VisitStonehenge @HighwaysEngland and @Wiltshirepolice @Stonehenge_King for #summersolstice updates on the night.

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE STONEHENGE BROADCAST

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Want to be involved in research at Stonehenge?

19 04 2018

By completing a questionnaire as you walk around Stonehenge you can help archaeologists to understand how people from different backgrounds view the landscape. This will help with interpretations of important sites like Stonehenge. If you would like to take part, simply access the questionnaire via the QR code or URL below. All you need to do is fill in some information about yourself and answer the questions as best as you can. 

survey

Why does this research matter?

Archaeologists try to study past people who have very different cultural backgrounds from themselves. Certain perceptual theories suggest that this will cause us to see landscapes differently than the people we study, whilst others state that this is not an issue. If we see landscapes differently, then how we interpret them may not accurately reflect the past.

In association with English Heritage and the University of Southampton

In association with English Heritage and the University of Southampton

This questionnaire forms part of PhD research looking into this issue and will be analysed for the final thesis.

Why me? Why here?

With visitors from all over the world Stonehenge is the perfect place to carry out this kind of study. We are not just looking for archaeological experts, but all sorts of people. You must be over 18 and give your consent to take part.

What information do you need?

In order to understand what attributes affect perception of the landscape we will ask you to fill in information such as age, gender and cultural background. All information will be completely anonymous and will be held securely in compliance with the Data Security Act and University of Southampton policy. Only the researcher will have access to the questionnaire responses.

What if I change my mind?

If you decide that you no longer want to take part, simply close this webpage without submitting the questionnaire.

Important Information

Please read this information carefully before deciding whether to take part in this research. By checking the box at the start of the survey you are indicating that you are aged over 18, and you are consenting to participate in this survey.

Please select your language by clicking here

Français- Bienvenue, souhaitez-vous contribuer à la recherche archéologique à Stonehenge?

En remplissant un questionnaire sur la façon dont vous voyez le paysage autour de Stonehenge, vous pouvez aider les archéologues à mieux comprendre comment les personnes de milieux différents perçoivent les paysages.

Sélectionnez votre langue en cliquant ici

Deutsche- Willkommen, möchten Sie zur archäologischen Forschung bei Stonehenge beitragen?

Durch das Ausfüllen eines Fragebogens, wie Sie die Landschaft um Stonehenge sehen, können Sie Archäologen besser verstehen, wie Menschen aus verschiedenen Hintergründen Landschaften wahrnehmen.

Bitte wählen Sie die Sprache aus, indem Sie hier klicken

Italiano- Benvenuto, vuole contribuire ad uno studio di ricerca archeologica a Stonehenge?

Compilando questo questionario sul paesaggio intorno a Stonehenge può contribuire ad aiutare gli archeologi a capire meglio come le persone provenienti da diversi ambiti percepiscono questo paesaggio. 

Selezioni la sua lingua cliccando qui

Español– Bienvenido, ¿le gustaría contribuir a la investigación arqueológica en Stonehenge?

Al completar un cuestionario sobre cómo ve el paisaje alrededor de Stonehenge, puede ayudar a los arqueólogos a comprender mejor cómo las personas de distintos orígenes perciben paisajes.

Por favor, seleccione su idioma haciendo clic aquí

Português- Bem-vindo, você gostaria de contribuir com pesquisas arqueológicas em Stonehenge?

Ao preencher um questionário sobre como você vê a paisagem em torno de Stonehenge, você pode ajudar os arqueólogos a entender melhor como as pessoas de diferentes origens percebem paisagens.

Selecione seu idioma clicando aqui

普通話- 歡迎您,您是否願意貢獻於巨石陣的考古研究?

通过填写一份关于你如何看待巨石阵周围景观的调查问卷, 你可以帮助考古学家更好地理解不同背景的人是如何感知景观的。

點擊這裡選擇你的語言

Visit the Stonehenge Survey website here.

Your response is completely anonymous. Data collected as part of this research will be kept confidential and published results will maintain that confidentiality.
In consenting to take part, your legal rights are not affected. If you have any questions about your rights as a participant in this research, or if you feel that you have been placed at risk, you may contact Prof. Denis McManus, the Chair of the Ethics Committee, Faculty of Humanities, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK. Email: D.Mcmanus@soton.ac.uk

If you are on a Stonehenge Tour or visiting independently your feedback is valuable.

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http://www.Stonehenge.News





Did you know April 18th is World Heritage Day?

18 04 2018

World Heritage is the shared wealth of humankind. Protecting and preserving this valuable asset demands the collective efforts of the international community. This special day offers an opportunity to raise the public’s awareness about the diversity of cultural heritage and the efforts that are required to protect and conserve it, as well as draw attention to its vulnerability.  Stonehenge and Avebury was inscribed onto the World Heritage List by UNESCO in 1986, along with 6 other sites in the UK. 

Stonehege World Heritage Site

Over the past 3 decades there have been a number of achievements by the many partners who share in the protection and enhancement of the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site.

These include:

  • Around 750 ha of agricultural land in WHS have been reverted to pasture with a great deal of support from Defra/Natural England. Not only does this help to protect fragile archaeological remains but has also had the benefit of enhancing biodiversity.
  • A huge amount of archaeological research has revealed more about the landscapes of the WHS and expanded our knowledge and understanding of the Site
  • Silbury Hill was stabilised and conserved in 2007, making good the work undertaken by antiquarians of the 18th and 19th centuries and archaeologists of the mid 20th century alike.
  • In 2012 the Site was able to fulfil the UK Government’s commitment made at the time of inscription to close the A344 right next to the Stones at Stonehenge
  • A new award winning Visitor Centre opened at Stonehenge in 2013 and now receives over 1.3million visitors per year.Stonehenge and Avebury UNESCO
  • The governance of the WHS was strengthened with the creation of a Stonehenge and Avebury WHS Coordination Unit in March 2014 and the creation of a WHS Partnership Panel to oversee the work of the two parts of the WHS in February 2014.
  • In May 2015, Stonehenge and Avebury WHS produced their first joint Stonehenge and Avebury WHS Management Plan

More information can be found about the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site on the website www.stonehengeandaveburywhs.org/

What are World Heritage Sites?

World Heritage Sites are cultural and natural sites of international importance described by UNESCO as being of Outstanding Universal Value. They represent the common heritage of the international community. On signing the World Heritage Convention, governments pledge to protect and present their Sites for this and future generations.

UNESCO grants the prestigious World Heritage Site status to sites that meet its strict international criteria. Today there are over 1,000 World Heritage Sites including the Pyramids, Machu Picchu, the Great Wall of China and the Amazon River Basin.

The UNESCO website provides more information on World Heritage Sites across the globe. You can find out more about Britain’s World Heritage Sites on the UNESCO  website.

Some historians and campaign groups are warning Stonehenge could have its famous World Heritage status taken away if the Government builds a tunnel underneath it – click here

Visit the English heritage website to find out more and book tickets. The best way to experience Stonehenge, understand its construction and hear about all the theories is to have a Tourist Guide explain it all on a Stonehenge Guided Tour

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World Heritage Day Event at Stonehenge: 18th April 2018

14 04 2018

World Heritage Day 2018
A celebration across Wiltshire of everything that is unique and special about our Worldwhs3 Heritage Site. Join people in other World Heritage Sites around the globe in getting out, having fun and learning more about our internationally important heritage.
World Heritage Day is a wonderful opportunity to showcase some of the many things that are so special about the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site landscape and to help people explore and enjoy it. This year the theme is Heritage for Generations.

Why not get together across the generations with your family and friends and explore more about World Heritage right here in Wiltshire.

Our amazing partners have arranged special talks, walks and exhibitions, and there is a fun day for families too. Turn over for more detail about all of the events and visit

 

View the Event Flyer for the 2018 World Heritage Day: WHDleaflet_online_version-1

Visit the Stonehenge and Avebury WHS website

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Some of the Stonehenge rocks were at Salisbury Plain ‘long before humans’

14 04 2018

Some of the largest rocks at Stonehenge were there long before humans and are not likely to have been moved to the location, an archaeologist says.#

 

Archaeologists and antiquarians have for centuries wondered why Stonehenge is where it is and why the largest stones were dragged miles to a hillside on Salisbury Plain.

An archaeologist who has excavated within the site says there is evidence people were drawn there because of the stones.

An archaeologist who has excavated within the site says there is evidence people were drawn there because of the stones.

It had been thought those stones, called sarsens, were brought from the Marlborough Downs, 20 miles (32km) away.

Mike Pitts, one of only a few archaeologists to have excavated within Stonehenge, has found evidence that two of the largest sarsen stones have been there for millions of years.

The largest megalith at the site, the heel stone, which aligns with sunrise on midsummer’s day, is 75 metres from the centre of the stone circle and weighs 60 tonnes.

Read the full (source) story here

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DNA, executions and Stonehenge: a new British Archaeology

10 04 2018

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

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Isn’t this a fabulous photo? We have some great images in the new British Archaeology, and we had fun with a series of shots showing a bronze age hoard under excavation. But I particularly like this photo taken by someone at Cotswold Archaeology (if you are reading this, let me know who you are!) which I’ve put at the top here. It shows a group of archaeologists excavating and recording some of the graves in an Anglo-Saxon and early medieval execution cemetery near Andover in Hampshire. There’s a relaxed, thoughtful conversation going on between all the protagonists, dead and alive, which is quite fascinating and memorable. If we had unlimited pages, I would have given this a double spread on its own.

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I’m very proud to lead with the feature by David Reich and Ian Armit on the new Beaker DNA study. This is significant stuff, and while there is…

View original post 1,117 more words





First Day of spring: Stonehenge crowd gathers for sunrise to celebrate the Spring Equinox.

20 03 2018

The first day of spring has been marked by 1000 revellers who gathered at Stonehenge to watch the sunrise.

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Druids and pagans were joined by a mass of revellers at the ancient monument to celebrate the spring or vernal equinox.

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Open access to the stones was given from first light, 05:45 GMT, by English Heritage which manages the site.

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