Stonehenge to be Celebrated with ‘Landmark’ Exhibition at British Museum #TheWorldOfStonehenge

8 12 2021

A forthcoming exhibition at the British Museum will celebrate the iconic megalithic monument Stonehenge in what the institution promises to be a “landmark show.” Set to open in February of next year, ‘The World of Stonehenge’ will surprisingly be the first time ever that the legendary site has served as the subject of a major event at the massive and prestigious museum. In keeping with that momentous occasion, curators putting the exhibition together have reportedly amassed a staggering array of artifacts, including approximately 250 pieces that have been loaned to the event from institutions throughout Europe and the UK.

Towering above the Wiltshire countryside, Stonehenge is perhaps the world’s most awe-inspiring ancient stone circle. Shrouded in layers of speculation and folklore, this iconic British monument has spurred myths and legends that persist today.

A key part of the collection, this 4,000-year-old Bronze Age timber structure has been nicknamed the Stonehenge of the Sea after it re-emerged on a Norfolk beach in 1998. It consists of a large upturned tree stump surrounded by 54 wooden posts. The oak posts, some up to 3m tall and form a 6.6m-diameter circle around the upturned oak, creating a giant tree-like spectacle. A narrow entranceway was built aligning to the rising midsummer sun and it is speculated the monument was used for ritual purposes.

The Nebra Sky Disc is 3,600 years old and will go on show at the London museum next year. Picture by: The British Museum

The aim is to set the stone monument – built 4,500 years ago, and one of the most recognisable sights in Europe – into the context of an era during which there was huge social and technological change.

 The World of Stonehenge is at the British Museum, London, from 17 February to 17 July 2022

Relevant Stonehenge News Links:
Story of Stonehenge to be told in major British Museum exhibition – The Guardian
British Museum exhibition explores Stonehenge of the sea – BBC News
Mysterious Seahenge monument coming to British Museum for Stonehenge show – Evening Standard
Guided Tours of Stonehenge with the megalithic experts – Stonehenge Guided Tours
A major exhibition on Stonehenge featuring 430 objects and artefacts is due to open at the British Museum. – The Conservative Post
The local Stonehenge touring experts based in Salisbury – The Stonehenge Travel Company
British Museum seeks loan of Ireland’s priceless artefacts for landmark exhibition – The Indepedent
World’s oldest map of the stars — is to go on display at the British Museum – Daily Mail

The Stonehenge News Blog
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Stonehenge’s Builders May Have Feasted on Mince Pies and Sweet Treats

2 12 2021

Excavations near the iconic English monument revealed traces of fruits and nuts.

  • Excavation work has been led by English Heritage at Durrington Walls, Wiltshire
  • Durrington Walls was inhabited by the builders of Stonehenge in about 2,500 BC
  • Evidence suggests traces of hazelnuts, sloes, apples and other fruits at the site 

Previously it was thought they had consumed pork, beef and dairy.

But excavations of the Durrington Walls settlement, inhabited by the builders of the monument in about 2,500 BC, suggest they collected and cooked hazelnuts, sloes and crab apples too.

Researchers said evidence of charred plant remains suggest they might have followed recipes to preserve the food.

There was no direct evidence for pastry being used, but people knew how to grow cereal crops and could have made pastry from wheat, hazelnut or acorn flour, English Heritage said.

Neolithic “mince pies” could have been baked on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire using a flat stone or ceramic pot heated in the embers of a fire, much like a Welsh cake, it added.

Travelers visiting Stonehenge this month can sample a dish that may have been enjoyed by the monument’s builders some 4,500 years ago. As Alex Green reports for PA Media, volunteers with English Heritage, the organization that cares for the prehistoric site, are cooking up mince pies with ingredients used by these Neolithic workers, including hazelnuts and crab apples.

‘We know that midwinter and feasting were really important to the builders of Stonehenge,’ said Susan Greaney, the charity’s senior properties historian.

‘Thanks to the Stonehenge Riverside Project, we’re lucky to have evidence which tells us that they had access to nutritious fruit and nuts, and that they may even have made and cooked recipes.’  

Durrington Walls is two miles (3.2 km) north-east of Stonehenge, but it’s located within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

Earlier this month, a a series of deep pits which were discovered at Durrington Walls last year were confirmed as having been made by ancient Britons – after some experts dismissed them as mere natural features.

The 20 pits, which are more than 30 feet across and 16 feet deep, are arranged in a circle shape around Durrington Walls.  

Stonehenge Relevant Links
Rock cakes? Stonehenge builders may have enjoyed mince pies – The Guardian
Stonehenge builders fuelled themselves on sweet treats including ‘Neolithic mince pies’, excavation suggests – Daily Mail
NEOLITHIC MINCE PIE RECIPE: Download open fire mince pie recipe card. English Heritage
Stonehenge’s Builders May Have Feasted on Sweet Treats – The Smithsonian
Visit Stonehenge and sample a mince pie – Stonehenge Guided Tours
Stonehenge builders had a sweet tooth, artefacts suggest – BBC News
Stonehenge builders fuelled themselves on sweet treats, excavation suggests – The Evening Standard
Private Guided Stonehenge Tours with the local experts – The Stonehenge Travel Company

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest Stonehenge News
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Stonehenge Winter Solstice Managed Open Access Arrangements 2021

28 11 2021

English Heritage are expected to offer a short period of access, from first light or safe enough to enter the monument field (approximately 07.30am until 10.00am) on the 22nd December. The winter solstice is one of the few times access is granted inside the stones. Sunrise is just after 8am on Wednesday 22nd December and visitors will be able to access the monument as soon as it is light enough to do so safely. This is subject of course to any changes in the coronavirus guidance.  

The solstice is the point in time when one hemisphere of the planet reaches the point tilted most towards the sun and the other is tilted furthest away. In the northern hemisphere, that gives us the winter solstice in December whilst in the southern hemisphere it is the summer solstice. After the shortest day, the days start getting longer and the nights shorter.

Stonehenge is carefully aligned on a sight-line that points to the winter solstice sunset.

Why is open access on the 22nd December?
In 2021, sunset on 21st December at Stonehenge is at 15.47.47, and the exact moment of the Solstice is 15 59.17 [hours, mins, secs] which means that by a few minutes, access will be for dawn on Wednesday 22nd December.

Access to Stonehenge for Winter Solstice is is subject to the Conditions of Entry. Please read these before deciding whether to attend.  Stonehenge is in a field on Salisbury Plain and the weather in December will be cold and wet.  Even if it isn’t raining, the ground will be wet from the dew and there may also be frost. Sensible footwear and warm, waterproof clothing is essential. Please note, parking charges apply.

DATE AND TIMES

Wednesday 22nd December 2021
6am: Limited car parking opens
7.45am (approximately depending on light levels): Monument field opens
8.09am: Sunrise
10am: Monument field closes

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

Stonehenge is an ancient prehistoric site which has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Winter Solstice for thousands of years and is seen by many as a sacred site.

English Heritage is pleased to provide free Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for Winter Solstice and ask that if you are planning to join us for this peaceful and special occasion that you read these Conditions of Entry and the information provided on the following pages before deciding whether to come.

Please help English Heritage to create a peaceful occasion by taking personal responsibility and following the Conditions of Entry and guidelines.  They have a duty of care to ensure public safety and are responsible for the protection of Stonehenge and its surrounding Monuments.  If we are to ensure that future access is sustainable, it is essential that everyone observes and abides by these Conditions of Entry.

COME PREPARED

  • Stonehenge is in a field on Salisbury Plain and the weather in December will be cold and wet. Even if it isn’t raining, the ground will be wet from the dew. There may also be frost. Sensible footwear and warm, waterproof clothing is essential.
  • There is at least a 30 minute walk in low light or darkness, from the Visitor Centre to Stonehenge itself.  You are strongly advised to wear strong, waterproof footwear, and to bring a torch with you.  A shuttle will run from the Visitor Centre to the Monument and visitors with accessibility requirements will hve priority.  All other visitors should be prepared to walk.
  • There are no catering facilities in the monument field; however the café at the visitor centre will be open for hot drinks and breakfast rolls from 6am.

If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Winter Solstice celebrations and do not have transport, you may want to consider joining an organised tour with transport from London, Bath or Salisbury and saving all the hassle and expense.  Stonehenge Guided Tours offer such tours and are the longest established company. Solstice Events offer small group tours from Bath and The Stonehenge Tour Company use only local expert guides and have a great reputation.

Stonehenge Winter Solstice Links:
The Rebirth of the Sun: the Winter Solstice at Stonehenge – STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
Winter Solstice: Wild tales of slaughtered bulls, human sacrifice and much merriment – THE SCOTSMAN
The Rebirth of the Sun: the Winter Solstice at Stonehenge – STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
Winter solstice: Why do pagans celebrate the shortest day of the year? THE TELEGRAPH
The Sun Stones: The Story of the Winter Solstice at Stonehenge – STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
Stonehenge Winter Solstice Tours from London – STONEHENGE GUIDED TOURS
Solstice at Stonehenge. From Past to Present. – STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
What has Stonehenge got to do with the winter solstice? – METRO NEWS
Stonehenge Winter Solstice Tours from Bath – SOLSTICE TOURS U.K
Celebrate Winter Solstice at Stonehenge – HOLIDAY EXTRAS
Solstice and Equinox Experience Tours – SOLSTICE EVENTS UK
The Stonehenge Sostice Pilgrims – STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
Stonehenge, the Winter Solstice, and the Druids – INTERESTRING ENGINEERING
Respecting the Stones.  Managed Open Access –STONEHENGE NEWS BLOG
Watch LIVE scenes from Stonehenge, wherever you are in the world! STONEHENGE FACEBOOK PAGE

The Stonehenge News Blog
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A series of deep pits which were discovered near Stonehenge last year have been confirmed as having been made by ancient Britons 

28 11 2021

New tests show neolithic pits near Stonehenge were human-made, 16ft craters near Neolithic site that experts wrote off as naturally occurring ‘blobs’ are confirmed as 4,500-year-old holes dug by ancient

Pits, which are around 30 feet across and 16 feet deep, were found in June 2020
Britons after scientists use underground mapping technology
They were arranged in a circle shape around the Durrington Walls Henge
It is two miles from the more famous Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire

The previously unknown subterranean ring is 20 times bigger than Stonehenge.

It is said to add to the evidence that early inhabitants of Britain, mainly farming communities, had developed a way to count, tracking hundreds of paces to measure out the pits.

It gives yet another twist to the story of the ancient monument.

Experts now believe that while Stonehenge was positioned in relation to the solstices, the boundary of pits may have had cosmological significance.

The team used groundbreaking technology to scan below the ground to detect where and when it had been disturbed. See relevant links below for full story.

The discovery is explored in a Channel 5 documentary titled Stonehenge: The New Revelations, to be aired on 9 December (9pm).

Relevant Stonehenge Links:
New tests show neolithic pits near Stonehenge were human-made – The Guardian
Stonehenge pits ARE man-made – The Daily Mail
New tests uncover Neolithic secret: ‘It’s one enormous structure’ – The Daily Express
Vast neolithic circle of deep shafts found near Stonehenge (June 2020) – The Guardian
Guided archaeological Tours of Stonehenge – Stonehenge Guided Tours
Visit Durrington Walls and Stonehenge with a local tour guide from Salisbury – The Stonehenge Travel Co.

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest Stonehenge News
http://www.Stonehenge.News





Unravelling the mystery of Stonehenge’s chalk plaques. The plaques are considered by archaeologists to be among the most spectacular examples of Prehistoric engraved chalk in Britain.

6 11 2021

RESEARCHERS have made the breakthrough discovery that engraved chalk plaques at Stonehenge depict real objects and not only abstract patterns, as was previously thought.

  • The four chalk plaques were found in Stonehenge’s vicinity between 1968–2017
  • Experts have said they are among the ‘most spectacular’ British engraved chalks
  • The surface of the plaques was mapped by Wessex Archaeology researchers 
  • One of the plaques contains a representation of a twisted cord, from real life

Engraved chalk plaques from the Late Neolithic found in the Stonehenge area depict real objects — not only abstract patterns, as previously thought — a study has found.

Considered among the most spectacular examples of Prehistoric British engraved chalk, the four plaques were found within three miles of each other from 1968–2017.

Two of the stones, for example, were recovered from the so-called ‘Chalk Plaque Pit’ as a product of the construction work to widen the A303 back in 1968.

The subject of extensive study, the decorated stones have now been scanned using a special texture mapping technique by experts from Wessex Archaeology.

The imaging has revealed previously unseen elements in the artworks — most of which appear to be geometric designs — which exhibit a range of artistic abilities.

Specifically, the archaeologists said, the engravings on the chalk plaques demonstrate deliberate, staged composition, execution and detail.

And one of the carvings on ‘plaque 1’ from the chalk pit, in particular, appears to be a representation of a twisted cord — an object likely known to the artist in life. 

The team believe the plaques’ art styles may have been integrated into elements of Middle Neolithic culture, forming a ‘golden age’ of chalk art in the Late Neolithic

Engraved chalk plaques from the Late Neolithic found in the Stonehenge area depict real objects — not only abstract patterns, as previously thought — a study has found. Plaques 1 and 2 (Image: Wessex Archaeology )

‘The application of modern technology to ancient artefacts has allowed us not only a better understanding of the working methods of the Neolithic artists,’ began  paper author Matt Leivers, also of Wessex Archaeology.

‘But also a rare glimpse into their motivations and mindsets,’ he concluded.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society.

Stonehenge relevant links:
Unravelling the mystery of Stonehenge’s chalk plaques – DAILY MAIL
Innovative technology sheds new light on Prehistoric chalk plaques from Stonehenge – WESSEX ARCHAELOGY
Guided Tours of Stonehenge with megalithic experts – STONEHENGE GUIDED TOURS
Stonehenge breakthrough as ‘revolutionary technology’ exposes ‘previously unseen features’ – DAILY EXPRESS
Stonehenge Plaques Hold Secret Cultural Data, Says New Study – ANCIENT ORIGINS
The local Stonehenge touring experts based in Salisbury – THE STONEHENGE TRAVEL COMPANY
Stonehenge Chalk Plaques – SILENT EARTH

The Stonehenge News Blog
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Secrets of the Dead: The First Circle of Stonehenge. New evidence on the origins of Stonehenge is uncovered.

27 10 2021

A decade-long archaeological quest reveals that the oldest stones of Stonehenge originally belonged to a much earlier sacred site: a stone circle built on a rugged, remote hillside in West Wales. Using the latest tools of geotechnology, a dedicated team of archaeologists led by Professor Mike Parker Pearson (University College London) painstakingly searched for the evidence that would fill in a 400-year gap in our knowledge of the site’s bluestones. Secrets of the Dead reveals the original stones of Europe’s most iconic Neolithic monument had a previous life before they were moved almost 155 miles from Wales to Salisbury Plain.

The episode will be available to UK audiences via PBS America. PBS America is the British television channel from America’s Public Broadcasting Service, available 24 hours a day on Freeview 84, Freesat 155, Virgin Media 273, Sky 174, Samsung TV Plus and on-demand with the Amazon UK channel.

As a point of reference, the season 19 opener for Secrets of the Dead, which premiered in the US on Wednesday, October 20, 2021, is – as of now – scheduled for multiple airings through October 31, 2021. You can see its current schedule at https://www.pbsamerica.co.uk/series/magellans-voyage-search-for-the-spice-islands/#6228.

Mike Parker Pearson between two Stonehenge bluestones. Photo credit: Barney Rowe / © TomosTVSC

Stonehenge references:
Stonehenge: Did the stone circle originally stand in Wales? – BBC
Stonehenge and Wales connection revealed in BBC2 Lost Circle – Salisbury Journal
Was Stonehenge originally built in Wales? Archaeologists unearth remains of Britain’s third largest stone circle and claim it was ‘dismantled and MOVED to Wiltshire’ – The Daily Mail
Ancient Welsh circle at Waun Mawn is brother of Stonehenge – The Times
How Stonehenge could have evolved from an earlier Welsh stone circle – The Telegraph
Stonehenge: The Lost Circle Revealed – what you need to know – Salisbury Journal
Guided Tours of Stonehenge with megalithic experts – Stonehenge Guided Tours
Stonehenge: Find backs theory that monument was dismantled and dragged over 140 miles to Wiltshire. – The Stonehenge News Blog
Dramatic discovery links Stonehenge to its original site – in Wales – The Guardian

The Stonehenge News Blog
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Stonehenge stories on Twitter

10 10 2021

How to Build Stonehenge by Mike Pitts. Draws on a lifetime’s study and a decade of new research to address the first question that every visitor asks: how was Stonehenge built?

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

How to Build Stonehenge comes out on February 17 2022. Published by Thames & Hudson, it has lots of illustrations (including new photos and diagrams by me) and is the first book to focus exclusively and comprehensively on this theme, since… the nearest equivalent I know is Herbert Stone’s The Stones of Stonehenge, published in 1924. I conceived it as a light, lockdown project (a short book with no illustrations, it’ll be done in three months, I assured my family) but once I began I got sucked in; there was a lot to say: to a lay readership, I suspect, most of it is new. I’m very excited about it.

When it was finished I put a Stonehenge photo in my Twitter profile, and now I’m changing it every week. Here they are with their stories, the most recent at the top – all photos taken by me.

This…

View original post 300 more words





Hundreds of druids and pagans descend on Stonehenge to celebrate the 2021 Autumn Equinox which marks the official start of autumn.

23 09 2021
  • Visitors headed to famous 5,000-year-old site in Wiltshire to see the sun rise this morning
  • Autumn equinox is one of four public annual events when people can get so close to stones
  • Hundreds of attendees sang and wore variety of extravagant outfits as onlookers watched on

Hundreds of druids and pagans descended on Stonehenge today to celebrate the equinox as autumn began.

Visitors headed to the famous 5,000-year-old site in Wiltshire in the dark to ensure they got to see the sun rise. And they made the most of one of only four public annual events that allows people to get so close to the stones. Photographs showed attendees singing and wearing a variety of extravagant outfits as onlookers watched on

Equinox Links:
See the stunning Autumn Equinox sunrise at Stonehenge – Salisbury Journal
Stonehenge autumn equinox gathering first since start of pandemic – BBC
Stonehenge Spring and Autumn Equinox Tours – Stonehenge Guided Tours
What is the Autumn equinox? Here’s what you need to know. National Geographic
Stonehenge and the Druids – Who are the Druids? Stonehenge News Blog
Walk amongst the stones of Stonehenge. (Equinox Tour exeperience) Blue Sky Traveller
The Stonehenge Pilgrims – Stonehenge News Blog
Stonehenge Summer and Winter Solstice Tours – Solstice Events U.K

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest Stonehenge news.
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For two weeks during September, English Heritage is carrying out repairs to the lintels at Stonehenge.

15 09 2021
  • Restoration work at Stonehenge has begun, with scaffolding erected inside ancient Salisbury monument
  • Strong winds buffeting the 4,500-year-old stone circle have taken their toll on its horizontal stones
  • Large-scale restoration this morning, with conservators seen scaling 22ft high scaffolding 
  • The last major job was conducted in 1958, when several stones were hauled back into place by Aubrey Bailey 
  • His son Richard Woodman-Bailey is being asked to place a £2 coin within Stonehenge at a ceremony 

For two weeks during September, English Heritage is carrying out repairs to the lintels at Stonehenge, replacing old degraded cement mortar that was used in the late 1950s to prevent weathering and secure the stones in position. The work will be heavily scrutinised by those on the project, in stark contrast to the work carried out in the 1950s.

Why are the stones being repaired?

Heather Sebire, English Heritage’s senior curator for the site, said: “Four-and-a-half-thousand years of being buffeted by wind and rain has created cracks and holes in the surface of the stone, and this vital work will protect the features which make Stonehenge so distinctive.”

Orientated towards the sunrise on the summer solstice, the sacred site includes several hundred burial mounds across the complex.

Scaffolding has been erected next to Stonehenge this morning as the ancient monument undergoes the first major repairs in more than six decades so cracks and holes in the stones can be refilled 

However, Stonehenge is showing its age, with laser scans showing the lintel stones, joints and concrete mortar that balance across the vertical pillars have heavily eroded.

The concrete mortar used in the most recent project is not breathable, leaving the ancient stones vulnerable from moisture. This moisture can freeze in winter, then when it thaws, leaves deep cracks.

Instead of using concrete, conservators and engineers are to use a more forgiving material, lime mortar.

This type of mortar keeps water out more efficiently and, when moisture does enter, it allows it to escape.

Unsheltered from the elements, Stonehenge is at the mercy of what ever nature throws its way. Thrashed by wind and rain, the UK’s every increasingly extreme weather is bound to take its toll on the ancient moment.

Visitors to Stonehenge will get a unique opportunity to see conservation in action while the work takes place. Stonehenge Guided Tours offer tours from London and can include the special access experience allowing you to enter the inner circle and get a closer look. The Stonehenge Travel Company offer guided tours from nearby Salisbury and Bath.

Relevant Stonehenge news Links:
Stonehenge restoration work begin. Daily Mail
Conservation project starts at Stonehenge – Salisbury Journal
Stonehenge project launched to repair deep lintel cracks – The Guardian
Stonehenge: English Heritage to repair cracked lintels – BBC News
Why is Stonehenge being repaired? – Wales Online
From Restoration to Conservation – English Heritage
Stonehenge to undergo first major repairs in 60 years to fill cracks and holes in monument – The Independent

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest Stonehenge News
http://www.Stonehenge.News






Stonehenge Autumn Equinox Managed Open Access Arrangements: 23rd September 2021

4 09 2021

The Autumn Equinox (Mabon) is rapidly approaching as the last days of summer slowly come to an end. English Heritage are expected to offer a short period of access, from first light or safe enough to enter the monument field (approximately 06.15am until 08:30am) on the 23rd September. This is subject of course to any changes in the coronavirus guidance.

Stonehenge is an ancient prehistoric site which has been a place of worship and celebration for thousands of years.

The Autumn Equinox is one of the rare occasions that English Heritage opens up the stones for public access. Equinox open access attracts fewer people than the Solstices – in the several hundreds rather than tens of thousands – and there are modern Druid ceremonies which are held in the circle around dawn, so if you prefer a quieter experience then attending the Autumn Equinox is a good choice.

English Heritage has facilitated Managed Open Access (MOA) to Stonehenge for the celebration of the summer solstice, winter solstice, spring and autumn equinox (spring and autumn equinox fall outside of this contract). English Heritage provides access to the stone circle and the monument field, free of charge to anyone who wishes to attend, but asks all those attending to comply with conditions of entry to ensure the safety of all visitors and to protect the monument. To safely provide MOA across the year, English Heritage works in partnership with Wiltshire Police and Wiltshire Council and engages experienced event managers and health and safety experts.

Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

What is the Equinox?
The equinox is when day and night are actually the same length. It happens several days before the spring equinox, and a few days after the autumn one.

The reason day and night are only almost equal on the equinox is because the sun looks like a disk in the sky, so the top half rises above the horizon before the centre

The Earth’s atmosphere also refracts the sunlight, so it seems to rise before its centre reaches the horizon. This causes the sun to provide more daylight than many people might expect, offering 12 hours and 10 minutes on the equinox.

The word ‘equinox’ itself actually mean ‘equal’ (equi) and ‘night’ (nox).

Respecting the Stones
Stonehenge is protected under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act and you must adhere to the regulations outlined in the act or face criminal prosecution. No person may touch, lean against, stand on or climb the stones, or disturb the ground in any way. The Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (as it then was). It was introduced by John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury, recognising the need for a governmental administration on the protection of ancient monuments – more information. View the conditions of entry and respect the Stones

If you or anyone else in your household feels unwell, or has been asked to self-isolate, we ask that you do not attend Stonehenge. Also if you plan to travel on one of our shuttle buses, or visit our toilets or café, we encourage you to bring and wear a face covering.

If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Autumn Equinox and do not have transport or simply want a hassle free experience you can join a specialist organised tour.  Use a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions of entry – Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company offering discreet tours from London or Bath, view their exclusive Autumn Equinox tour and save 25% by using discount code and Solstice EQUINOX21. You could also try Solstice Events U.K who offer small group Equinox tours.

Equinox Links:
What is the autumnal equinox? Royal Museums Greenwich
What is the Autumn equinox? Here’s what you need to know. National Geographic
Stonehenge and the Druids – Who are the Druids? Stonehenge News Blog
Walk amongst the stones of Stonehenge. (Equinox Tour exeperience) Blue Sky Traveller
Stonehenge Autumn Equinox Tours – Stonehenge Guided Tours
The Stonehenge Pilgrims – Stonehenge News Blog

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for Equinox updates and Stonehenge news
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