Was Stonehenge constructed as part of a fertility cult?

10 12 2017

Professor Terance Meade of said Wiltshire-based Stonehenge’s ancient builders create a ‘play without words’ in which one stone in particular cast a growing phallic-shaped shadow.

Stonehenge was built to cast phallic-shaped shadows during Midsummer and was part of a fertility cult, a new study claims.

Professor Terance Meade said Stonehege’s ancient builders create a ‘play without words’ in which one stone in particular cast a growing phallic-shaped shadow.

The shadow would penetrate the egg-shaped monument before hitting a central ‘female’ stone — symbolising fertility.

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Professor Terance Meade of said the Stonehege’s ancient builders create a ‘play without words’ in which one stone in particular cast a growing phallic-shaped shadow

Professor Meaden examined nearly 20 stone circle across Britain – including one at Avebury – and filmed their changing silhouettes at sunrise on ritually important days throughout the year.

He said the shape of the monuments at Stonehenge allow the same ‘play without words’ to reoccur at significant dates in the Neolithic farming calendar.

‘My basic discovery is that many stone circles were built at a time of a fertility religion, and that stones were positioned such that at sunrise on auspicious dates of the year phallic shadows would be cast from a male-symbolic stone to a waiting female-symbolic stone,’ Prof Meaden told The Daily Telegraph.

The archaeologist added that on certain days of clear sunrise, the shadow of the ‘externally sited’ phallic Heel Stone penetrates the great monument during the summer solstice before finally arriving at the recumbent Altar Stone — which is symbolically female.

Read more (Source): http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5163629/Was-Stonehenge-constructed-fertility-cult.html#ixzz50qUY8Jqx

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Stonehenge Winter Solstice Celebrations: 22nd December 2017

25 11 2017

English Heritage will once again welcome people to Stonehenge to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Sunrise is just after 8am on Wednesday 22nd December and visitors will be able to access the monument as soon as it is light enough to do so safely. Please read the information below before planning your visit

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PRACTICAL INFORMATION:

DATE AND TIMINGS
FRIDAY 22nd DECEMBER 2017
MONUMENT FIELD OPENS: 07.45am (approximately, depending on light levels)
MONUMENT FIELD CLOSES: 10am

Please note, access to Stonehenge for Winter Solstice is free. Parking charges apply.

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

Access to Stonehenge for solstice is subject to the Conditions of Entry – please read these before deciding whether to attend.  Please aslo read this article on respecting the Stones.

COME PREPARED

Stonehenge is in a field on Salisbury Plain and the weather in December will be cold and may be wet and windy. Even if it isn’t raining, the ground will be wet from the dew. There may also be frost.

Please be prepared for a 30 minute walk (in low light or darkness), from the bus drop off and from parking areas to the monument. You are strongly advised to wear warm and waterproof clothing and footwear and bring a torch with you.

Toilets at the Monument Field will only be available once the access period begins. There are no catering facilities in the monument field, however the café at the visitor centre is open for hot drinks and breakfast rolls from 6am.

Please note that there are no other amenities or facilities available to visitors until the Monument Field opens.

GETTING HERE:

Parking for Winter Solstice is very limited and English Heritage cannot guarantee that you will be able to park near to Stonehenge. If you are planning to travel by car, wherever you park there may be a 30 minute walk to the Monument. We strongly recommend car sharing or using public transport.

Car Sharing – Request or offer a lift to Solstice at Stonehenge

Travel by bus – Salisbury Reds buses will be running from 06:30 from Salisbury (New Canal, Stop U and Salisbury Rail Station). Check timetable.

Organised Tours – If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Winter Solstice celebrations you can even join an organised tour.  Use a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions.  Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company and offer guided tours and transport from London and Solstice Events offer small group Winter Solstice tours from Bath using local expert guides.

Blue Badge Parking – Blue badge parking is in the visitor centre car park and permits must be booked in advance. There is accessible transport to the monument field from the visitor centre beginning at approximately 6.30am. Permits available from Solstice.Stonehenge@english-heritage.org.uk

Parking and parking charges Limited parking is available in the winter solstice car parks, which will open at 5.30am on the 22nd December. (Stonehenge re-opens to all visitors from 11.30am on Friday 22nd December)

As you approach Stonehenge, there will be signs to direct you to the car park – please ensure that you follow these. Please do not arrive early as there is no waiting on the roads in the area and you will be moved on.

Parking may involve a shuttle journey to the visitor centre and wherever you park there may be a 30 minute walk.

  • Cars, private hire minibuses and live-in vehicles £5
  • Motorbikes £2
  • Commercial coaches £100

The car parking charge is designed to encourage people to car share and will help the charity offset  the costs of providing additional staffing and lighting in the car parks.

Please note, car parking charges apply to all users of the Winter Solstice car parks, including Blue Badge holders, and members of English Heritage and National Trust.

Motorists have access to a park and ride shuttle from the off-site solstice car parking to the visitor centre. A shuttle will also be provided between the visitor centre and Stonehenge, however visitors are asked to note that disabled people have priority on this bus and should therefore be prepared for a 30 minute walk, in low light, from parking areas to the monument.

English Heritage cannot guarantee entry to the car parks and recommend coming by public transport as cars will be turned away when the car parks are full.

 

Please visit the official English Heritage website for full details.

Relevant links:
Respecting the Stones
Salisbury Reds Local Bus Service

English Heritage Conditions of Entry
The Salisbury Reds special solstice shuttle service

Follow @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @VisitStonehenge @HighwaysEngland @VisitWiltshire and @Wiltshirepolice for #WinterSolstice2017 updates on the day.

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Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site: Managing a globally important site in a local context by Sarah Simmonds. 23rd November 2017

20 11 2017

Discover more about Stonehenge and Avebury in this fascinating talk by Sarah Simmonds. Sarah will talk about what it is that makes the Stonehenge and Avebury landscapes internationally significant.
StonehengesIn the second part of her talk she will consider some of the challenges for protecting these attributes of outstanding universal value and how these are being met at a national and local level. Sarah Simmonds is the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site Partnership Manager.


SWINDON: Museum and Gallery

THURSDAY 23RD NOVEMBER, 2017 7:00pm
BOOK HERE

Venue: Swindon Museum and Art Gallery

Many of the key documents related to the Stonehenge and Avebury WHS and its management can be found here.

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Stonehenge builders ‘ate food from Scotland’

19 10 2017

The “army of builders” of Stonehenge ate animals transported from as far away as the north east of Scotland, according to a new exhibition at the famous Neolithic site in Wiltshire. 

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Analysis of pig and cattle teeth has revealed some of the animals were from as far as 500 miles away.

The “Feast! Food at Stonehenge” exhibition includes the skull of an aurochs, an extinct species of cattle.

It is aimed at allowing visitors to explore diet from 4,500 years ago.

English Heritage historian Susan Greany said: “Our exhibition explores the important role feasts and food played at Stonehenge.

“Raising the ancient stones was an incredible feat but so too was feeding the army of builders.

“Our exhibition reveals just how this was done.”

The displays reveal research and stories from a “feeding Stonehenge” project, which has been exploring the lives of the people who lived at the nearby settlement of Durrington Walls.

The researchers say thousands of discarded animal bones and teeth excavated at Durrington Walls suggest it was not a typical village but a site of major feasting and ceremony.

Read the full story (article source) on the BBC NE Scotland, Orkney & Shetland website.

Links:
English Heritage will launch a new special exhibition at Stonehenge in October 2017

What did neolithic man eat after a hard day at Stonehenge? Sweet pork and rich cheese

Roasted sweet pork with cheese and butter: What was on the menu for (lactose intolerant) Stonehenge Man

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW OF THE STONEHENGE FEAST

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The new Permissive Path at Stonehenge is finally open.

9 10 2017

The new Permissive Path at Stonehenge is finally open after a three-year delay waiting for the grass to grow strong enough to bear the weight of a few cyclists and pedestrians.

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A group of pedestrians and cyclists from surrounding villages joined together to mark the re-opening of the route, accompanied by former Wiltshire councillor Ian West. He campaigned strongly against English Heritage for the path to be re-opened as specified in a planning agreement.

The right of way passes within a few feet of the Heal Stone and gives free access to the public. The path allows the public to use the old A344 road and the new path from Airman’s Corner roundabout to the A303 free of charge and without any passes.

“It allows you to take some beautiful photographs without having to have a local residents’ pass and then booking your appointment time along with other tourists,” said a jubilant Mr West. “The path opens up the old connection between Shrewton and West Amesbury, if you are brave enough to cross the A303, although the authorities deem it to be a safe crossing,” he added.

Horses are not permitted on the new path, which is part of the old road now grassed over, but they can go from the roundabout to By-Way 12, which passes close to the stones, to Larkhill in one direction and Druids Lodge in the other, free of charge and without passes. This opens up the access to the by-way and allows travel in both directions on horseback.

Article source: Valley News

Relative links:
A344 Permissive Path – Open by 1st Oct 2017
Usability of the Stonehenge Permissive Path on the route of the old A344

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Hundreds of druids and pagans descend on Stonehenge to celebrate the Autumn Equinox

24 09 2017

Hundreds of pagans and druids descended on Stonehenge on the 23rd September to celebrate the equinox as autumn began.

Visitors headed to the famous 5,000-year-old site in Wiltshire in the dark to ensure they got to see the sun rise.

And they made the most of one of only four public annual events that allows people to get so close to the stones.

Photographs showed attendees singing and wearing a variety of extravagant outfits as onlookers watched on.

 

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Stonehenge Autumn Equinox Open Access Arrangements: 23rd September 2017

21 09 2017

English Heritage are expected to offer a short period of access, from  first light or safe enough to enter the monument field (approximately 06.30am) until 08:30am on the 23rd September this year

The Autumn Equinox (Mabon)
The 2017 Autumn Equonox is September 22nd at 21:02 GMT
Sunrise will be 6.58am

equinox-druids

It is the time of the autumn equinox, and the harvest is winding down. The fields are nearly empty, because the crops have been plucked and stored for the coming winter. Mabon is the mid-harvest festival, and it is when we take a few moments to honor the changing seasons, and celebrate the second harvest. On or around September 21st, for many Pagan and Wiccan traditions it is a time of giving thanks for the things we have, whether it is abundant crops or other blessings. It’s a time of plenty, of gratitude, and of sharing our abundance with those less fortunate.

Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

The word ‘equinox’ itself actually mean ‘equal’ (equi) and ‘night’ (nox).

Respecting the Stones
The conditions of entry for the Managed Open Access.  Click here

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