Stonehenge Autumn Equinox Open Access Arrangements: 23rd September 2018

22 09 2018

English Heritage are expected to offer a short period of access, from  first light or safe enough to enter the monument field (approximately 06.30am) until 08:30am on the 23rd September this year.

The Autumn Equinox (Mabon)
The 2018 Autumn Equinox is September 23rd at 02.54am GMT
Sunrise will be 6.55am

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Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

What is the Equinox?

The equinox is when day and night are actually the same length. It happens several days before the spring equinox, and a few days after the autumn one.

The reason day and night are only almost equal on the equinox is because the sun looks like a disk in the sky, so the top half rises above the horizon before the centre, according to the Met Office.

The Earth’s atmosphere also refracts the sunlight, so it seems to rise before its centre reaches the horizon. This causes the sun to provide more daylight than many people might expect, offering 12 hours and 10 minutes on the equinox.

The word ‘equinox’ itself actually mean ‘equal’ (equi) and ‘night’ (nox).

Respecting the Stones
The conditions of entry for the Managed Open Access.  Click here

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Stonehenge was a ‘neolithic rave venue’. Paul Oakenfold has become the first DJ to play a set at the ancient Stonehenge monument in Wiltshire.

14 09 2018

DJ Paul Oakenfold plays set at Stonehenge Stone Circle

The trance DJ, who has spent his summer working in Ibiza, performed his set at the World Heritage Site on Thursday – a closely guarded secret.

Just 50 people were allowed to attend the event which happened as the sun went down.

“I’m very lucky to get asked to perform and do a live show to sunset,” Oakenfold told the BBC.

Paul Oakenfold is the first DJ to play at Stonehenge - BBC

Paul Oakenfold is the first DJ to play at Stonehenge – BBC

The DJ, who has previously played at venues including the Great Wall of China and Base Camp at Mount Everest, admitted there had been “a lot of preparation”.
Read the full story on the BBC website

Stonehenge was a ‘neolithic rave venue’ (Daily Mail)

Mysterious Stonehenge was a dance arena for ancient revellers listening to ‘trance-style’ music, according to one professor who is an expert in sound.

Part-time DJ Dr Till, an expert in acoustics and music technology at  Huddersfield University, believes the standing stones of  Stonehenge had the ideal acoustics to amplify a ‘repetitive trance rhythm’ not  dissimilar to some kinds of modern trance music.

The original Stonehenge probably had a ‘very pleasant, almost concert-like acoustic’ that our ancestors slowly perfected over many generations.  Because Stonehenge itself is partially collapsed, Dr Till, used a computer model to conduct experiments in sound.

The most exciting discoveries came when he and colleague Dr Bruno Fazenda  visited a full-size concrete replica of Stonehenge, which was built as a war memorial by American road builder Sam Hill at Maryhill in Washington state.

He said: ‘We were able to get some interesting results when we visited the  replica by using computer-based acoustic analysis software, a 3D soundfield  microphone, a dodecahedronic (12-faced) speaker, and a huge bass speaker.

‘We have also been able to reproduce the sound of someone speaking or clapping  in Stonehenge 5,000 years ago.

‘The most interesting thing is we managed to get the whole space (at Maryhill)  to resonate, almost like a wine glass will ring if you run a finger round it.

‘While that was happening a simple drum beat sounded incredibly dramatic. The  space had real character; it felt that we had gone somewhere special.’
Read the full story in the Daily Mail

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STONEHENGE will be giving visitors a taste from the past in September as they launch their first ever Big Feast weekend.

29 08 2018

Big Feast will be celebrated at Stonehenge this weekend

Across the first weekend of September (next Saturday) the English Heritage site will be giving visitors an insight into some of the first ever meals tasted at the stones.

The Big Feast is coming to Stonehenge ©English Heritage

The Big Feast is coming to Stonehenge ©English Heritage

The Neolithic event will begin on Saturday, September 1, from 9.30am, and flints, roasting spits and stews will be just some of the historic touches to the feast, with celebration foods that have not been seen or tasted for around 4,500 years, including historical dish roasted pork shoulder with honey and blackberries.

Food demos will be held at the event so visitors can learn for themselves how to make a successful Neolithic dish, demonstrated with prehistoric- style cook-ware, and recipe cards will be provided so meals can be replicated within the home for years to come.

For those with a big appetite, history – inspired goods including a hog roast will be available during the weekend, or visit the Neolithic supermarket to learn about the early foods and farming industry.

Additionally experts will be giving talks throughout the foody festivities, teaching about the world of farming and the diets of ancestor builders.

Entry to the weekend is included in a general admission ticket, with local resident pass holders and English Heritage and National Trust England members invited to come along free of charge.

For further information visit the English Heritage website.

Article Source: Salisbury Journal

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Who built Stonehenge? Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales.

3 08 2018

THE formation of Stonehenge is a centuries old mystery but a team of researchers may have just cracked one of Stonehenge’s many enigmas.

The question of Stonehenge’s origin has baffled the public imagination and scientists worldwide for more than a century.

Stonehenge: Scientists have discovered who is buried at the historic and mysterious site

Despite many years of archaeological research, very little is known about who erected stone formation and for what purpose.

Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales

But the scientific community could be on the verge of a major breakthrough thanks to an international collaboration with a group of scientists from the University of Oxford.

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports looked at a number of ancient remains buried at the historic site more some 5,000 to 4,400 years ago.

The study gave a glimpse into the origin of Stonehenge, suggesting the standing stones were transported more than 124 miles (200 km) from a quarry in West  to the Stonehenge site in Wessex.

For year scientists have focused on why Stonehenge was built but never quite looked at who exactly built the stone monument and who was buried at it.

A number of cremated and buried remains are scattered across the Stonehenge site, perhaps some of the poor denizens whose hard work built the structure.

The new investigation examined a total of 25 skulls and bones originally excavated form 56 Stonehenge pits in the 1920s.

Read more:
Stonehenge mystery SOLVED: Who built Stonehenge? Latest study on stone formation REVEALED (Source)
Stonehenge: Origins of those who built world-famous monument revealed by groundbreaking scientific research
Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales
Ground-breaking Science Reveals People Buried at Stonehenge Came from Way Out West

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Stonehenge builders may have transported megaliths down ‘stone highway’ from Wales. Has the secret of Stonehenge been solved?

29 06 2018

The mystery of how the gigantic rocks of Stonehenge were transported may finally have been solved.

A new study claims the huge hunks of hardened earth and minerals were moved from Welsh quarries on a ‘stone highway’ encompassing roads and rivers.

Experts have long been baffled by how the massive boulders were transported from Wales to Salisbury Plain.

Now, they believe they may have found the source for the stones as well as the route used to deliver them from Pembrokeshire to Wiltshire.

  • New study claims to have uncovered the mystery of how Stonehenge was built
  • Giant stones that made up the monolith were transported from Wales to England
  • Experts are baffled as to how neolithic man moved them to Salisbury Plain 
  • New study claims ‘stone highways’ of roads and rivers were used
Stonehenge

Stonehenge, located near Amesbury, in Wiltshire, is an iconic site but historians often debate the origins of its construction and how the stones reached there

The smaller bluestones come from Pembrokeshire, and the huge sarsens come from Marlborough Downs.

However it is unknown where the sandstone of the main Altar Stone originates, but Richard Bevins of the Museum of Wales and Rob Ixer of the University of Leicester told The Times that it “very probably” came from the Senni Beds which go from Llanelli to Herefordshire.

Stonehenge was built in three stages, with some parts being a huge 5,000 years old. The outer bank of Stonehenge was made in around 3000 BC, while the stone settings were built in 2500 BC.

Read the full story:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5899227/Has-secret-Stonehenge-solved.html
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6654449/stonehenge-builders-megaliths-stone-highway-wales/

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Megalith tells stones’ secrets. New book focusses on the Wiltshire stone circles.

29 06 2018

SOLSTICE morning marked both the longest day of the year and the release of new book Megalith: Studies in Stone that claims to reveal secret behind the mystery of the cosmology surrounding stone circle constructions like Avebury.

Megalith is the first global study into the stones at both Avebury and Stonehenge and megalthhas been penned by stone circle experts including Robin Heath, that focusses on the Wiltshire circles.

Among the insights in Megalith, the book argues that there were probably once 99 stones in the outer circle at Avebury.

Contributing author Robin Heath, author of 11 books on prehistoric and ancient sciences, said: “The eight contributing authors to Megalith have undertaken original research on the nature and purpose of megalithic monuments outside the boundaries of the present day archaeological model of prehistory. This pioneering collection of their work celebrates megalithic society’s abilities and achievements in a new light, revealing an intellectual facet of prehistory, one that was employing an integrated and coherent cosmology, a megalithic science, more than 6,000 years ago.”

Mr Heath was joined by publisher and editor John Martineau giving talks about at both sites about the monuments. John Martineau, founder of the Megalithomania conference said: “The megalithic culture of western Europe left behind some vast and enigmatic temples, and yet there is little understanding of the cosmology driving their construction.” On solstice morning 9500 people flooded Stonehenge and 600 attended Avebury. No arrests were made at Stonehenge and two in Avebury.

Eight co-authors and experts in their fields have contributed to the book to shed light on the original purposes of Avebury and other sites where stone circles dominate the landscape.

Article (source) by Alison Grover: The Wiltshire Gazette and Herald

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Stonehenge Summer Solstice: Thousands gather for longest day

21 06 2018

THOUSANDS of revellers have gathered at Stonehenge in Wiltshire to celebrate the arrival of summer and the year’s longest day, in a ritual that dates back thousands of years.

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About 9,500 people were at the Neolithic monument to greet the start of the longest day of the year, according to Wiltshire Police.

The sun appeared behind the Heel Stone at 04:52 BST to cheering and applause from the crowd.

The summer solstice is one of the rare occasions that English Heritage opens up the stones for public access.

As with last year’s event, Wiltshire Police confirmed it had stepped up security with armed police on patrol.

Although thousands attended the solstice, the force said 3,500 fewer people came to watch the sunrise compared with 2017.

Supt Dave Minty, Wiltshire Police’s overnight commander, said behaviour at the stones was “brilliant”, with no arrests made.

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“The sunrise was amazing, and we don’t see many of those,” he added.

“People seem to have adapted really well to the heightened level of security and they’ve been really patient with it.”

On the summer solstice, the sun rises behind the Heel Stone, the ancient entrance to the stone circle, and sunlight is channelled into the centre of the monument.

It is believed that solstices have been celebrated at Stonehenge for thousands of years.

The site holds special significance for members of the Druid and Pagan community, who perform rituals and celebrations at the summer and winter solstices.

FULL STORY (SOURCE) BBC NEWS

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