Have you ever wondered what it would have been like for our Neolithic ancestors to bring the giant sarsen stones on the 20 mile journey from Marlborough Downs to Stonehenge?

7 03 2018

Now you can find out at one of our special workshops. Working with a team of other visitors, try your hand at moving and raising a 4 tonne limestone block using ropes, rollers and pulleys.

MOVING AND RAISING A STONE: 10th / 11th March 2018

moving-raising-stone-stonehenge

DATE: Sat 10 & Sun 11 Mar 2018
TIME: 10.30am, 1pm and 3.30pm

LOCATION: Stonehenge Visitor Centre
SUITABLE FOR: Everyone

 

Vist the English Heritage Website for full details

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Stonehenge Rocks! A talk with Prof Timothy Darvill: 21st March 2018

24 02 2018

Stones of many different kinds, shaped and built into intriguing structures, is what makes Stonehenge special; a unique monument in the world of early farming communities in northwest Europe. Join Prof. Timothy Darvill as he explores some of the main components that made up Stonehenge in the late third millennium BC, asking: What were they for? How might they have worked? Why were the stones chosen? And what made the place rock?

tim-stones

THIS IS THE THIRD IN THE SERIES OF LECTURES TO MARK THE ANNIVERSARY OF CECIL AND MARY CHUBB’S GIFT OF STONEHENGE TO THE NATION.

Tickets are free but places must be reserved by calling the English Heritage Bookings Team on 0370 333 1183 (Mon – Fri 8.30am – 5.30pm, Sat 9am – 5pm). The telephone bookings will close at 3pm the day before the event.

Hosted by English Heritage:

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The builders of Stonehenge 5,000 years ago were almost completely wiped out by mysterious ‘Beaker people.

23 02 2018

The astonishing result comes from analysis of DNA extracted from 400 ancient remains across Europe.

The builders of Stonehenge are thought to be the last of Britain's neolithic people

The builders of Stonehenge are thought to be the last of Britain’s neolithic people

Stonehenge has a proud place in Britain’s history as one of the wonders of the world and the best-known prehistoric monument in Europe.

But, according to a major new study, modern-day Britons are barely related to the ingenious Neolithic farmers who built the monument 5,000 years ago.

Instead the British are related to the ‘Beaker people’ who travelled from modern-day Holland and all but wiped out Stonehenge’s creators.

The findings are ‘absolutely sort of mind-blowing,’ said archaeologist Barry Cunliffe, a professor emeritus at the University of Oxford.

‘They are going to upset people, but that is part of the excitement of it.

Stonehenge | Everything you need to know

Stonehenge is perhaps the world’s most enigmatic pile of rocks. Some archaeologists think it was an observatory, others a place of healing.

According to Swiss author Erich von Däniken, the building techniques were passed on from aliens; medieval texts show it being constructed by Merlin.

However, according to Win Scutt, properties curator at English Heritage, “the landscape in which Stonehenge sits is far more interesting than the circle itself”. Despite this, he adds, few people explore the wider area.

That landscape has been poorly treated in past decades, with traffic on the A303 and A344 roaring right past the site. In 2013, the A344 and old car park were removed; now, the landscape has recovered, grass has regrown and Stonehenge has been reconnected with its ancient processional avenue.

The next step is to re-route the A303, which cuts through the World Heritage Site, compromising its integrity. The Government has committed to building a tunnel for the road; in May 2016, the International Council on Monuments and Sites and Unesco backed the scheme, although current proposals remain controversial.

Relevant Stonehenge news links:
Today, British have more DNA from the ‘Beaker people’ than Neolithic farmers

Ancient Britons ‘replaced’ by newcomers

No one living in Britain ‘truly British’, scientists find as Stonehenge builders were replaced by European immigrants

Britain’s prehistoric catastrophe revealed: How 90% of the neolithic population vanished in just 300 years

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New theory over Stonehenge origins

18 02 2018

THE community that built the Neolithic causewayed enclosure at Larkhill may have been the architects of the Stonehenge landscape, archaeologists believe.

New theory over Stonehenge origins A Beaker or Bronze Age infant burial site at Larkhill. Picture by Wessex Archaeology

The causewayed enclosure, which dates between 3650 to 3750 BC – pre-dating Stonehenge by 600 years, was uncovered by archaeologists from Wessex Archaeology in 2016.

Si Cleggett, project manager and archaeologist at Wessex Archaeology now believes the community who built the causewayed enclosure may have been more closely involved in the planning of Stonehenge than previously thought.

He said: “The causewayed enclosure at Larkhill was constructed during the late Stone Age, a period of transition when our ancestors gradually moved away from a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle and embraced a farming existence where the domestication of livestock and control of agriculture began.”

Causewayed enclosures are believed to be meeting places, centres of trade and cult or ritual centres to name but a few. They are only 70 known examples.

The Wessex Archaeology teams were commissioned by WYG on behalf of the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) to undertake excavations on land adjacent to Royal Artillery Larkhill. The land, on the edge of Salisbury Plainand, immediately north of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, has been earmarked for the provision of service family accommodation under the Army Basing Programme.

Archaeologists believe there was a five post alignment at the entrance of the causewayed enclosure which were positioned almost identically to the stones of Stonehenge.

Mr Cleggett said: “The communities who gathered at the Larkhill causewayed enclosure during the Early Neolithic were there 600 years before the landscape setting of Stonehenge was conceived and may have been involved in the conceptualisation or even the creation of the landscape we see today.

“It is enormously fitting that thousands of years later, those that strive to protect our identity as a nation will again meet at Larkhill through the delivery of service family housing.”

The Larkhill site, which is 24 hectares, is the largest open area archaeological excavation ever undertaken in proximity to the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

Article Source: Katy Griffin – Salisbury Journal

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It’s your final chance to have a say on the plans to build a tunnel for the A303 at Stonehenge.

8 02 2018

It’s your final chance to have a say on the plans to build a tunnel for the A303 at Stonehenge over the next weeks before they get sent off to go for planning permission.

tunnell

A public consultation starts today (Thursday Feburary 8th) and lasts through until Friday April 6th, with some public exhibitions planned for us to take a look for ourselves.

HAVE YOUR SAY:

Here’s the list of the public exhibition events being held over the next few weeks:

  • Friday 9th February – Antrobus House, 39 Salisbury Road, Amesbury SP4 7HH, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Saturday 10th February – Antrobus House, 39 Salisbury Road, Amesbury SP4 7HH, 11.00am – 5.00pm
  • Thursday 22nd February – Kennet Valley Village Hall (Avebury), Overton Road, Lockeridge, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 4EL, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Friday 23rd February – Warminster Civic Centre, Sambourne Road, Warminster, BA12 8LB, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Saturday 24th February – Shrewton Village Hall, Recreation Ground, The Hollow, Shrewton, SP3 4JY, 11.00am – 5.00pm
  • Tuesday 27th February – The Laverton Hall, Bratton Road, Westbury, BA13 3EN, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Thursday 1st March – Mere Lecture Hall, Salisbury Street, Mere, Wiltshire BA12 6HA, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Saturday 3rd March – The Guildhall, Salisbury, The Market Place, Salisbury, SP1 1JH, 11.00am – 5.00pm
  • Thursday 8th March – Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BE, 12 noon – 8.00pm
  • Friday 9th March – The Manor Barn, High Street, Winterbourne Stoke, SP3 4SZ, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Saturday 10th March – The Manor Barn, High Street, Winterbourne Stoke, SP3 4SZ, 11.00am – 5.00pm
  • Tuesday 13th March – Avon Valley College, Durrington, SP4 8HH, 2.00pm – 8.00pm
  • Wednesday 14th March – Larkhill Primary School, Wilson Road, Larkhill, SP4 8QB, 4.00pm – 8.30pm
  • Friday March 23rd – Antrobus House, 39 Salisbury Road, Amesbury SP4 7HH, 2.00pm – 8.00pm

WATCH: Take a look at the plans for the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down, including a visualisation video of what it might look like on our news page

Relevant Links:

The Knotty Problem of the A303 and Stonehenge.

A303 STONEHENGE: Have your say (Spire FM)

Stonehenge A303 tunnel plans revealed – and they include a flyover at Countess roundabout (Salisbury Journal)

Revealed: Plans for £1.6bn two-mile road tunnel that will restore tranquillity to Stonehenge by ‘brutally intruding’ beneath the sacred site (Daily Mail)

Stonehenge tunnel: plans for £1.6bn scheme published (The Guardian)

Stonehenge A303 tunnel plans will ‘protect and enhance’ monument (BBC NEWS)

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Prehistoric Enclosure Found Near Stonehenge

3 02 2018

LARKHILL, ENGLAND —According to a report in The Guardian, a team led by Si Cleggett

England-Larkhill-alignment

Wessex Archaeology

of Wessex Archaeology has uncovered a series of nine post holes in a causewayed enclosure they say matches the orientation of the circle at Stonehenge. The site is located a short walk from Stonehenge, and dates to between 3750 and 3650 B.C., or about 600 years before a circular ditch and timber posts were first installed at the Stonehenge site. Cleggett suggests the people who built the enclosure at Larkhill may have been the architects of the Stonehenge landscape. “That nine-post alignment could be an early blueprint for the laying out of the stones at Stonehenge,” he said. For more, go to “The Square Inside Avebury’s Circles.”

 

An exhibition at the site gives fresh insight into the builders of Stonehenge, showcasing research that suggests animals were brought from as far afield as northern Scotland to feed the engineers and for lavish midwinter feasts.

The Larkhill dig, which is taking place because the land is being cleared for military housing, has also unearthed some fascinating 20th-century history.

REad the article in the Archaeological Magazine

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2018 Moon Phases for Stonehenge. #FullMoon #Calendar

14 01 2018

Ancient peoples had the benefit of dark skies and experienced the full spectacle of the starry heavens. The Moon gave light at night and would have been particularly useful in the two weeks centred on full Moon. The regular monthly cycle of lunar phases provided a convenient measure of time, upon which many ancient calendars were based.

Was it a Neolithic calendar? A solar temple? A lunar observatory? A calculating device for predicting eclipses? Or perhaps a combination of more than one of these? In recent years
Stonehenge has become the very icon of ancient astronomy, featuring in nearly every discussion on the subject.
A more informed picture has been obtained in recent years by combining evidence from archaeology and astronomy within the new interdiscipline of archaeoastronomy – the
study of beliefs and practices concerning the sky in the past and the uses to which people’s knowledge of the skies were put.

Lunation New Moon First Quarter Full Moon Third Quarter Duration
1175 2 Jan 02:24 8 Jan 22:25 29d 19h 47m
1176 17 Jan 02:17 24 Jan 22:20 31 Jan 13:26 7 Feb 15:53 29d 18h 48m
1177 15 Feb 21:05 23 Feb 08:09 2 Mar 00:51 9 Mar 11:19 29d 16h 06m
1178 17 Mar 13:11 24 Mar 15:35 31 Mar 13:36 8 Apr 08:17 29d 12h 46m
1179 16 Apr 02:57 22 Apr 22:45 30 Apr 01:58 8 May 03:08 29d 9h 51m
1180 15 May 12:47 22 May 04:49 29 May 15:19 6 Jun 19:31 29d 7h 55m
1181 13 Jun 20:43 20 Jun 11:50 28 Jun 05:53 6 Jul 08:50 29d 7h 05m
1182 13 Jul 03:47 19 Jul 20:52 27 Jul 21:20 4 Aug 19:17 29d 7h 10m
1183 11 Aug 10:57 18 Aug 08:48 26 Aug 12:56 3 Sep 03:37 29d 8h 04m
1184 9 Sep 19:01 17 Sep 00:14 25 Sep 03:52 2 Oct 10:45 29d 9h 45m
1185 9 Oct 04:46 16 Oct 19:01 24 Oct 17:45 31 Oct 16:40 29d 12h 15m
1186 7 Nov 16:01 15 Nov 14:54 23 Nov 05:39 30 Nov 00:18 29d 15h 18m
1187 7 Dec 07:20 15 Dec 11:49 22 Dec 17:48 29 Dec 09:34 29d 18h 08m
* All times are local time for Stonehenge. Dates are based on the Gregorian calendar.
Source: Time and Date

Stonehenge Links:

Astro Moon Calendar shows phases of the Moon each day, astronomical events and astrological forecast for the year.
Stonehenge and other stone monuments were probably used for special moonlit ceremonies.
Stonehenge and Ancient Astronomy. Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site
Stonehenge Full Moon Guided Walking Tours.  Explore the landscape with a local historian and astronomer.
All eyes on the sky! We’ll see a supermoon, blue Moon, and blood Moon all in one night!
How to see the super blue moon, a cosmic event you won’t want to miss

The Stonehenge News Blog
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for daily Stonehenge Sunset / Sunrise / Moonrise / Moonset times.

 








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