Stonehenge tunnel plans finalised by government.

12 01 2017

Long-awaited plans for a road tunnel past Stonehenge have been finalised by the government.

The proposal for a 1.8-mile (2.9 km) dual carriageway tunnel is aimed at easing congestion on the nearby A303.

a303

The proposals involve building a tunnel for the A303 which runs past the ancient monument

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said the proposal will “transform’ the road and benefit people by “cutting congestion and improving journey times”.

A public consultation aimed at drivers and residents will run until 5 March.

The tunnel plans form part of a £2bn government scheme to upgrade all remaining sections of the A303 between the M3 and M5.

Highways England’s Jim O’Sullivan said: “Our plans for the A303 recognise the national importance of the route and these improvements will bring real benefit to the region and local communities.

“The public exhibitions will provide an excellent opportunity to explain further our plans and to hear feedback from stakeholders on our proposals to deliver the scheme.”

A report by UNESCO and the International Council on Monuments and Sites has recognised the benefits of the project.

At the moment the busy A303 passes within a few hundred metres of the ancient monument.

However, campaign group Stonehenge Alliance believes any tunnel shorter than 2.7-miles (4.3 km) would do “irreparable damage to the landscape”.

In 2015 it launched a petition calling for a longer tunnel which gained 17,500 signatures.

A spokesperson said: “The Alliance does not advocate new road building at Stonehenge but accepts the need to improve the tranquillity and appearance of the World Heritage Site and its setting.

“If the government insists on widening the A303 by means of a tunnel it must be sufficiently long to avoid any further damage to [Stonehenge] and its setting.”

English Heritage and the National Trust have also given their support to the option of “the longest tunnel possible”.

Chairman of Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust Andy Rhind-Tutt described the tunnel plan as a “self-destructing time bomb” which would “do nothing” for traffic problems in the area.
BBC NEWS

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2016 Stonehenge Summer Solstice Information

17 06 2016

Once upon a time (until 1977, actually) it was possible to turn up and wander around the world-famous prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, touching ancient stones and experiencing wonderment at being in such an atmospheric place, often alone. Not any more – all those hands were contributing to erosion and today’s multitudinous visitors may look but not touch.

druids-equinox

Stonehenge began as a circular ditch and earth bank constructed around 3100 BC, with the standing stone circle erected some nine centuries later. Research suggests that Stonehenge marked an important burial site, but this prosaic explanation is not accepted by everyone.  The purpose of Stonehenge has long been passionately debated with diverse theories mooted – these include religious ritual, astronomical observation and assorted complex and often outlandish supernatural notions. Was it really a landing site for space travellers? Probably not.

Whatever the truth, the place retains an aura of mystery. It was the site of the
Stonehenge Free Festival
1972 and 1984, when revellers gathered to celebrate alternative culture at the summer solstice. That laid-back era came to end in 1985 when the police did battle with ‘New Agers’ bent on reaching Stonehenge after the festival was banned.

Guardians English Heritage relented in 1999, and those who wish to experience the summer solstice in the company of like-minded people are now permitted to do so. Many thousands who gather to do just that invariably experience powerful emotion at the moment when the sun rises over the mystical circle on solstice morning, and find themselves amidst all sorts of alternative believers like neo-pagans and druids in fantastic garb who are conducting esoteric ceremonies. It’s a magical moment, but reality soon intrudes – the site must be cleared by 08.00 so Stonehenge can revert to lucrative ‘tourist business as usual’. (content extracted from 501 Must-be-there Events (501 Series) by David Brown and Arthur Findlay)

English Heritage are pleased to welcome people to Stonehenge to celebrate this year’s Summer Solstice. This is the 17th year that English Heritage has provided access to the stones and are looking forward to a peaceful and sober celebration.

MONDAY 20th JUNE
Access to monument field – 7pm
Sunset – 9:26pm
TUESDAY 21st JUNE
Sunrise – 4:52am
Monument field closes – 8am

 Timings for Summer Solstice at Stonehenge
    • SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS 19.00 hours (7pm) 20 June (see new charges)
    • ACCESS TO STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD 19.00 hours (7pm) 20 June
    • LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK 06.00 hours (6am) 21 June – or earlier if full
    • STONEHENGE MONUMENT FIELD CLOSES 08.00 hours (8am) 21 June
    • SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED 12.00 hours (12 Noon) 21 Jun

“We strongly advise anyone planning to come to Stonehenge for solstice to leave their cars at home and travel by public transport. Salisbury is easily accessible by train and the local Salisbury Reds bus company will be running a special service from Salisbury to Stonehenge through Saturday night and into the next day. Solstice Events are offering their usual transport from Bath and Stonehenge Guided Tours are offering their popular annual tour / transfer from London.

 

Bus service information: including timetables and costs can be found on Salisbury Reds website.
Train service information: trains run regularly to Salisbury from London, Bristol, Bath and Southampton. Train times, tickets and further information for your train journey can be found at:
South West Trains
South West Trains
Tel: 0845 6000 650
Great Western Railways
Great Western
Tel: 0845 7000 125
National Rail Enquiries
National Rail Enquiries
Tel: 0845 7484 950

Follow @St0nehenge @EH_Stonehenge @HighwaysEngland @Wiltshirepolice and @VistWiltshire for #summersolstice updates on the night.

If you are unable to visit Stonehenge on the Solstice you can watch our LIVE PERISCOPE BROADCAST

The Stonehege News Blog
Respect the Stones and each other!
Follow the Solstice News on Twitter: @St0nehenge  and Facebook

 

 

 





Designers appointed for A303 tunnel at Stonehenge

15 01 2016

A DESIGN consultant has been appointed to develop a preferred option to improve the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down in Wiltshire.

303-henge-road

Traffic queues along the A303 past Stonehenge in Wiltshire as people head away to the west country this weekend. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Friday July 5, 2013. Photo credit should read: Chris Ison/PA Wire

As part of a £15B strategy to invest in roads over the next five years, the government has pledged to improve this section of the A303, including a tunnel near Stonehenge and a bypass of Winterbourne Stoke.

Highways England has announced that a package of work with an estimated value of £17.5M has been awarded to an Atkins/Arup joint venture. The companies will develop options to take to public consultation and ultimately will announce a preferred route.

Once the preferred route has been announced, the Planning Inspectorate will examine the development in public, before the transport secretary makes any final approval. Construction work is expected to begin by April 2020.

By WGD_Mumby

Read more: http://www.westerngazette.co.uk/Designers-appointed-A303-tunnel-Stonehenge/story-28528092-detail/story.html#ixzz3xIEN8jG0

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