Vernal (Spring) Equinox at Stonehenge.

25 02 2017

The Spring Equinox in 2017 falls on March 20th and occurs at 10:28am GMT. The time is for the instant when the Sun crosses the celestial equator moving northwards and has a celestial longitude of 0°. Everywhere on Earth has a day and night of almost equal length and it marks the beginning of the northern spring season.

Druids and Pagans enjoying the Equinox sunrise celebrations at Stonehenge.

Druids and Pagans enjoying the Equinox sunrise celebrations at Stonehenge. Copyright

There is considerable debate in the archaeoastronomy community as to whether the Equinox had any special meaning for the builders of Stonehenge. They had no accurate clocks by which they could determine when the day and night were almost exactly equal and discovering the mid-point between the Winter and Summer solstice can be done in a couple of obvious ways.

You can count the days and divide by two. Or you can mark the summer and winter sunrise positions along the horizon and divide that line into two equal parts. These two methods give different results.

For example, counting the days between Winter Solstice 2016 (December 21st) and Summer Solstice 2017 (June 21st) gives 182 days. Half of that is 91, meaning the midpoint would fall on March 22nd 2017 – two days after the actual Equinox.

north_season

The time is for the instant when the Sun crosses the celestial equator moving northwards and has a celestial longitude of 0°

 

Using the “divide the horizon” approach causes an additional problem – at the Solstices do you mark the first gleam of the Sun appearing, the point when half of it is above the horizon or when it has fully risen and the full orb is standing exactly on the horizon?

The difference in position between using “first gleam” and “full orb” is about 1.5° because the Sun rises at an angle. As a result the halfway position could be 0.75° different depending on your choice and that is one and a half times the width of the Sun’s disc, potentially putting your Equinox out by a day or so.

In any event, there is no alignment through Stonehenge for the Equinox and what’s more there isn’t even a clear sightline directly through the monument that runs true East-West towards the Equinox sunrise position, in the way that there are clear sightlines for the Solstice sunrises and sunsets.

That doesn’t mean you can’t get a nice photo of an equinox sunrise when it’s clear, because you can.

equinox-sunrise

English Heritage Charitable Trust allows everyone in to the centre of the monument for the Spring Equinox sunrise, in the same way that they do for the Autumn Equinox and the two Solstices, through their “Managed Open Access” events. It’s one of only four occasions in the year when open access is allowed.

It’s worth checking with their customer services department (0370 333 1181) a week or so ahead because sometimes they set the actual day of the open access to be different to the day when the Equinox occurs.

Equinox open accesses attract fewer people than the Solstices – in the several hundreds rather than tens of thousands – and there are modern Druid ceremonies which are held in the circle around dawn, so if you prefer a quieter experience then attending an Equinox is a good choice.

If you do visit Stonehenge on the Equinox please respect the special terms of entry and read this blog: ‘Respecting the Stones’

If you are considering visiting Stonehenge for the Solstice or Equinox celebrations you can join a specialist organised small group tour.  Use a only a reputable tour operator who respect the conditions of entry.  Stonehenge Guided Tours are the longest established company offering award winning discreet tours from London. Solstice Events offer small group sunrise tours using only local expert guides.

Article by guest blogger and local Stonehenge historian Simon Banton

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Stonehenge NEWS and updates from the World’s most famous ancient monument.

20 01 2017

Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on Stonehenge Stone Circle. We have 10’000’s of followers on Twitter and our Stonehenge News Facebook page.  Our media channels have a vast local / international audience and our daily Stonehenge News blogs are shared globally – frequently having a readership reaching 100,000’s

STONEHENGE NEWS

We are keen to hear your Stonehenge news and stories.  If you are a guest blogger, local or international newsgroup, an archaeologist, local reporter, historian, travel reviewer,  tour guide or a member of the general public we want to hear your Stonehenge news.
Please email your Stonehenge news, review or story  for inclusion on our blog / social media to latest@Stonehenge.News

Subjects covered:

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Please remember: We are not reporters, we are repeaters!

In addition to our popular Stonehenge Twitter news feed we are also launching a new dedicated Stonehenge News twitter account: @Stonehenge_News

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Ordnance Survey Benchmarks at Stonehenge

18 11 2016

Amongst all the various carvings on the stones at Stonehenge, from the modern graffiti of the 17th to the 20th century and the ancient axe heads and daggers from about 1700BC, there are three that are not often noticed.

These are the Ordnance Survey (OS) benchmarks.

The OS website says: “Bench marks are the visible manifestation of Ordnance Datum Newlyn (ODN), which is the national height system for mainland Great Britain and forms the reference frame for heights above mean sea level.”

The original reference datum levelling survey was begun in Liverpool in 1840 using a benchmark on St. John’s Church, and in 1844 it was changed to the tidal pole in Victoria Dock. The reference Mean Sea Level (MSL) for the datum was established over a nine day period of tidal observations.

A second levelling survey was carried out in 1912-21 and the datum was changed to MSL at Newlyn in Cornwall. In the 1950s a third survey was performed, still making use of the Newlyn datum.

The OS benchmarks at Stonehenge are in the traditional form of three lines / | \ beneath a horizontal bar which is the indicator of the reference height above the datum’s MSL at that spot.

stone-16-annotatedCoincidentally, this is a similar form to that of the Druidic “Awen” emblem which also uses three lines / | \  but positioned below three dots rather than a horizontal bar. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awen for the history and an explanation of this symbol.

At Stonehenge two of the benchmarks are on the Heel Stone and one is on Stone 16.

Stone 16 is the tooth-like stone at the southwest side of the monument directly behind the tallest stone on the site, and the benchmark is low down on the left of the southeast face.

 

This references the Newlyn datum, is 103.114m above MSL and was last verified in 1957.

The Heel Stone is the massive leaning stone some 80m northeast of the stone circle which famously (but only roughly) indicates the position where the sun appears on the horizon at the summer solstice as seen from the centre of the stone circle.

Its benchmarks are low down on the right hand side of the northeast faceheelstone-annotated

The upper one references the original Liverpool datum, is 101.346m above MSL and was last verified in 1900.

The lower one references the Newlyn datum, is 100.7m above MSL and was last verified in 1957.

From the Newlyn benchmarks, you can work out that there’s a drop of 2.414m from the one on Stone 16 to the one on the Heel Stone.

None of these benchmarks are visible from any of the visitor paths around the monument, although if the light is right (early morning or evening in summer) the upper one on the Heel Stone can just be made out from the National Trust field.

To see them properly you’ll need to come to one of the Managed Open Accesses at the solstices or equinoxes.

Alternatively, you can book a private Stone Circle Access visit which take place most days of the year before and after regular opening times.

STONE CIRCLE ACCESS

Stone Circle Access visits, give you a unique opportunity to experience up close this world famous monument. The visits take place outside of our normal general admission opening hours and are subject to very limited availability. Please note that this is not a guided tour, and touching of the stones is not permitted.  You can try Stonehenge Guided Tours for these special access tours

Article by guest blogger and local Stonehenge historian Simon Banton

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Stonehenge and the Druids

20 10 2016

Back in the mid 1600s one man came to the realisation that Stonehenge was far older than previously thought. Based on his studies, John Aubrey attributed the monument to the British pre-Roman priesthood called the Druids.

This began an association that has persisted for over 350 years despite all attempts by archaeologists to shake it. In the minds of most people, the Druids built Stonehenge.

The popularisation of the idea really took off in the 1700s when William Stukeley wrote a book called “Stonehenge – A Temple Restor’d to the British Druids”. So convinced was Stukeley that he styled himself as the Druid “Chyndonax” in the frontispiece of his book.

Stukeley as Chyndonax.jpg

Inspired, perhaps, by this vision of an ancient British tradition one of the first of a number of modern Druid groups was founded in 1781 by Henry Hurle. Called the “Ancient Order of Druids” (AOD), it was created as a fraternal organisation and quickly established a quasi-Masonic lodge structure that eventually spread to the USA and Australia.

What followed over the next century was the creation of a plethora of groups, orders and groves whose history is intertwined and overlapping. Making sense of this Druidic family tree is an almost impossible task but in broad outline it is as follows.

In 1792, a Welshman named Edward Williams (aka Iolo Morganwg), who claimed that the rites and customs of the ancient Druids had survived the Roman invasion, founded the Gorsedd of Welsh Bards at Primrose Hill in London. His literary works were to have a profound effect on the early neo-Druid movement and his influence persists to this day.

In 1833 the AOD split over a disagreement about lodge independence from the central Grand Lodge and a group of more than 100 lodges set up a new group called the “United Ancient Order of Druids”. Such arguments and secessions have been a hallmark of neo-Druidism ever since.

The Ancient and Archaeological Order of Druids (AAOD) was founded in 1874 by Wentworth Little, a Rosicrucian and Freemason, with the intent of studying the links between freemasonry and ancient Druidic tradition.

By 1905, the AOD were holding ceremonies at Stonehenge to initiate new members into their order, up to 250 at a time. Some of the press ridiculed the use of cardboard sickles and fake beards, but many of their members were respected members of society – lawyers, doctors and clergy – who wanted to remain anonymous.

Sir Winston Churchill and Sir Edmund Antrobus (then owner of Stonehenge) were members of the AOD, although Churchill has also been associated with the AAOD.

ancient-order-of-druids-stonehenge-1905

In 1909 another new group – “The Druid Order” was founded by George MacGregor-Reid. Somewhat confusingly they were also known variously as “The Ancient Druid Order”, “The British Circle of the Universal Bond” and “An Druidh Uileach Braithreachas” (ie “The Universal Druid Brotherhood”). This group claims to have been founded in 1717 by John Toland, though this is disputed.

Ultimately this group also split – in 1964 – to form the “Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids” under its leader Ross Nichols. The group offers correspondence courses to those interested in Druidry.

Of all the Druids that celebrate Summer Solstice at Stonehenge, it’s The Druid Order that arguably has the longest tradition. They begin at midnight at the barrows southwest of Stonehenge, continue with a dawn observance and ultimately hold a noon ceremony within the monument itself.

The Druid Order at Stonehenge.jpg

More recently founded neo-Druid and pagan groups also hold ceremonies at Stonehenge at various times of the year. These include – in no particular order – the Dolmen Grove, the Dorset Grove, the Cotswold Order, the Loyal Arthurian Warband (LAW), the Stonehenge and Amesbury Druids and the Gorsedd of Cor Gawr.

the-dolmen-grove

Although the details of the ceremonies are varied, one theme is the re-enactment of a ritual battle between the Oak King and the Holly King which occurs twice a year, at Summer Solstice (when the Holly King wins) and the Winter Solstice (when the Oak King wins). Usually this is carried out using swords or wooden staves, but it has been seen done with rubber chickens and water pistols!

For the Open Access events at the Solstices and Equinoxes, at which everyone is allowed in to the centre of the monument to witness the sunrise, a pre-Dawn ceremony is usually led by some of the most recognisable of the modern Druids – notably King Arthur Uther Pendragon of the LAW and Rollo Maughling of the Glastonbury Order.

These are inclusive ceremonies that allow the general public an insight into the beliefs and traditions while serving to highlight the continuing modern use of Stonehenge as a Druidic Temple.

loyal-arthurian-warband

Here are links to some of the Druid Orders.

The Ancient Order of Druids – http://www.aod-uk.org.uk

The Druid Order – http://thedruidorder.org

Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids – http://druidry.org/

The Dolmen Grove – http://www.dolmengrove.co.uk/

The Dorset Grove – http://www.dorsetgrove.co.uk/

The Cotswold Order – http://www.twistedtree.org.uk/

The Loyal Arthurian Warband – http://www.warband.org.uk/

The Stonehenge and Amesbury Druids – http://www.stonehenge-druids.org/

The Gorsedd of Cor Gawr – http://bards.org.uk/

The Glastonbury Order of Druids – http://www.glastonburyorderofdruids.com/

Article written by guest blogger Simon Banton. Local historian and Stonehenge expert.

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Hundreds of druids and pagans descend on Stonehenge to celebrate the Equinox which marks the official start of autumn

23 09 2016
  • Visitors headed to famous 5,000-year-old site in Wiltshire to see the sun rise this morning
  • Autumn equinox is one of four public annual events when people can get so close to stones
  • Hundreds of attendees sang and wore variety of extravagant outfits as onlookers watched on
  • Temperatures stayed high as Britain entered astronomical autumn after we had 23.6C yesterday

Hundreds of druids and pagans descended on Stonehenge today to celebrate the equinox as autumn began.

Visitors headed to the famous 5,000-year-old site in Wiltshire in the dark to ensure they got to see the sun rise.

And they made the most of one of only four public annual events that allows people to get so close to the stones.

Photographs showed attendees singing and wearing a variety of extravagant outfits as onlookers watched on.

Autumn Equinox Celebrations

Big event: The equinox happens twice a year around March 20 and September 22, between the summer and winter solstices

Read the full story in the Daily Mail
By MARK DUELL FOR MAILONLINE

The Stonehenge News Blog





Stonehenge Opening Hours Summer 2015

21 07 2015

You now park over a 2 kilometres from Stonehenge itself, out of sight of the Stonehenge monument. Here there is a modern visitor centre and excellent exhibition and education facilities plus a spacious cafe and souvenir gift shop. A Stonehenge shuttle bus transports you between the visitor centre and the Stone Circle.  English Heritage advise to budget for a visit of around 2 hours. The Visit Wiltshire App is a must for those visiting Stonehenge and the surrounding area.

Last admission time is 2 hours before the advertised closing time.

Entrance to Stonehenge is now managed through timed tickets and advance booking is required. Booking is the only way to guarantee entry on the day and at the time of your choice. Advance bookings are advised!

A temporary coach park will be built near to Stonehenge, Wiltshire Council has agreed

This includes FREE visits by English Heritage and National Trust members (applicable to members of the National Trust in England only – does not include National Trust Scotland or other National Trust affiliated organisations).

1 JUNE – 31 AUGUST 2015

Monday 9:00 – 20:00
Tuesday 9:00 – 20:00
Wednesday 9:00 – 20:00
Thursday 9:00 – 20:00
Friday 9:00 – 20:00
Saturday 9:00 – 20:00
Sunday 9:00 – 20:00

1 SEPTEMBER – 15 OCTOBER 2015

Monday 9:30 – 19:00
Tuesday 9:30 – 19:00
Wednesday 9:30 – 19:00
Thursday 9:30 – 19:00
Friday 9:30 – 19:00
Saturday 9:30 – 19:00
Sunday 9:30 – 19:00

16 OCTOBER 2015 – 15 MARCH 2016

Monday 9:30 – 17:00
Tuesday 9:30 – 17:00
Wednesday 9:30 – 17:00
Thursday 9:30 – 17:00
Friday 9:30 – 17:00
Saturday 9:30 – 17:00
Sunday 9:30 – 17:00

HOLIDAY OPENING TIMES FOR THIS PERIOD

Christmas Eve
24 Dec 2015
Closed
Christmas Day
25 Dec 2015
Closed
Boxing Day
26 Dec 2015
10:00 – 16:00
Boxing Day Bank Holiday
28 Dec 2015
9:30 – 17:00
New Year’s Eve
31 Dec 2015
9:30 – 17:00
New Year’s Day
1 Jan 2016
10:00 – 16:00

Please visit the English Heritage Website for details and current prices

Visit Wiltshire Official Website
Salisbury Museum
Devizes Museum
Amesbury Museum
Stonehenge Transport from Salisbury
Stonehenge Guided Tours from London

Enjoy your visit to Stonehenge!

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The Stonehenge Calendar. Sunrise and Sunset Times 2015

21 07 2015

Stonehenge was primarily a functional scientific instrument, used for measuring angles.  The angles of interest were the rising and setting bearings of the sun, moon, and stars.  It was therefore possible, over a period of time, to map the entire visible sky. Please find below accurate times for the sunset, sunrise and the moon phases.

Stonehenge Sunrise

July 2015
Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 4:56am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 8:33pm
Moonset: 4:39am
2

Sunrise: 4:56am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 9:22pm
Moonset: 5:39am
3

Sunrise: 4:57am
Sunset: 9:26pm
Moonrise: 10:05pm
Moonset: 6:46am
4

Sunrise: 4:58am
Sunset: 9:25pm
Moonrise: 10:42pm
Moonset: 7:59am
5

Sunrise: 4:59am
Sunset: 9:25pm
Moonrise: 11:14pm
Moonset: 9:15am
6

Sunrise: 5:00am
Sunset: 9:24pm
Moonrise: 11:44pm
Moonset: 10:32am
7

Sunrise: 5:00am
Sunset: 9:24pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 11:49am
8

Sunrise: 5:01am
Sunset: 9:23pm
Moonrise: 12:12am
Moonset: 1:05pm
9

Sunrise: 5:02am
Sunset: 9:23pm
Moonrise: 12:41am
Moonset: 2:20pm
10

Sunrise: 5:03am
Sunset: 9:22pm
Moonrise: 1:11am
Moonset: 3:33pm
11

Sunrise: 5:04am
Sunset: 9:21pm
Moonrise: 1:45am
Moonset: 4:44pm
12

Sunrise: 5:05am
Sunset: 9:20pm
Moonrise: 2:23am
Moonset: 5:50pm
13

Sunrise: 5:06am
Sunset: 9:20pm
Moonrise: 3:07am
Moonset: 6:50pm
14

Sunrise: 5:08am
Sunset: 9:19pm
Moonrise: 3:57am
Moonset: 7:43pm
15

Sunrise: 5:09am
Sunset: 9:18pm
Moonrise: 4:52am
Moonset: 8:28pm
16

Sunrise: 5:10am
Sunset: 9:17pm
Moonrise: 5:52am
Moonset: 9:06pm
17

Sunrise: 5:11am
Sunset: 9:16pm
Moonrise: 6:54am
Moonset: 9:39pm
18

Sunrise: 5:12am
Sunset: 9:15pm
Moonrise: 7:57am
Moonset: 10:07pm
19

Sunrise: 5:13am
Sunset: 9:14pm
Moonrise: 9:00am
Moonset: 10:32pm
20

Sunrise: 5:15am
Sunset: 9:13pm
Moonrise: 10:03am
Moonset: 10:55pm
21

Sunrise: 5:16am
Sunset: 9:11pm
Moonrise: 11:05am
Moonset: 11:18pm
22

Sunrise: 5:17am
Sunset: 9:10pm
Moonrise: 12:07pm
Moonset: 11:42pm
23

Sunrise: 5:19am
Sunset: 9:09pm
Moonrise: 1:09pm
Moonset: none
24

Sunrise: 5:20am
Sunset: 9:08pm
Moonrise: 2:12pm
Moonset: 12:06am
25

Sunrise: 5:21am
Sunset: 9:06pm
Moonrise: 3:15pm
Moonset: 12:34am
26

Sunrise: 5:23am
Sunset: 9:05pm
Moonrise: 4:19pm
Moonset: 1:05am
27

Sunrise: 5:24am
Sunset: 9:04pm
Moonrise: 5:20pm
Moonset: 1:42am
28

Sunrise: 5:26am
Sunset: 9:02pm
Moonrise: 6:19pm
Moonset: 2:27am
29

Sunrise: 5:27am
Sunset: 9:01pm
Moonrise: 7:11pm
Moonset: 3:22am
30

Sunrise: 5:28am
Sunset: 8:59pm
Moonrise: 7:58pm
Moonset: 4:25am
31

Sunrise: 5:30am
Sunset: 8:58pm
Moonrise: 8:39pm
Moonset: 5:36am

August 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 5:31am
Sunset: 8:56pm
Moonrise: 9:14pm
Moonset: 6:53am
2

Sunrise: 5:33am
Sunset: 8:54pm
Moonrise: 9:46pm
Moonset: 8:12am
3

Sunrise: 5:34am
Sunset: 8:53pm
Moonrise: 10:16pm
Moonset: 9:31am
4

Sunrise: 5:36am
Sunset: 8:51pm
Moonrise: 10:45pm
Moonset: 10:50am
5

Sunrise: 5:37am
Sunset: 8:49pm
Moonrise: 11:16pm
Moonset: 12:07pm
6

Sunrise: 5:39am
Sunset: 8:48pm
Moonrise: 11:48pm
Moonset: 1:23pm
7

Sunrise: 5:40am
Sunset: 8:46pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 2:35pm
8

Sunrise: 5:42am
Sunset: 8:44pm
Moonrise: 12:25am
Moonset: 3:42pm
9

Sunrise: 5:43am
Sunset: 8:42pm
Moonrise: 1:06am
Moonset: 4:44pm
10

Sunrise: 5:45am
Sunset: 8:41pm
Moonrise: 1:54am
Moonset: 5:39pm
11

Sunrise: 5:47am
Sunset: 8:39pm
Moonrise: 2:46am
Moonset: 6:26pm
12

Sunrise: 5:48am
Sunset: 8:37pm
Moonrise: 3:44am
Moonset: 7:06pm
13

Sunrise: 5:50am
Sunset: 8:35pm
Moonrise: 4:44am
Moonset: 7:40pm
14

Sunrise: 5:51am
Sunset: 8:33pm
Moonrise: 5:46am
Moonset: 8:09pm
15

Sunrise: 5:53am
Sunset: 8:31pm
Moonrise: 6:49am
Moonset: 8:36pm
16

Sunrise: 5:54am
Sunset: 8:29pm
Moonrise: 7:52am
Moonset: 9:00pm
17

Sunrise: 5:56am
Sunset: 8:27pm
Moonrise: 8:54am
Moonset: 9:23pm
18

Sunrise: 5:57am
Sunset: 8:25pm
Moonrise: 9:56am
Moonset: 9:47pm
19

Sunrise: 5:59am
Sunset: 8:23pm
Moonrise: 10:58am
Moonset: 10:11pm
20

Sunrise: 6:01am
Sunset: 8:21pm
Moonrise: 12:00pm
Moonset: 10:37pm
21

Sunrise: 6:02am
Sunset: 8:19pm
Moonrise: 1:02pm
Moonset: 11:06pm
22

Sunrise: 6:04am
Sunset: 8:17pm
Moonrise: 2:04pm
Moonset: 11:40pm
23

Sunrise: 6:05am
Sunset: 8:15pm
Moonrise: 3:05pm
Moonset: none
24

Sunrise: 6:07am
Sunset: 8:13pm
Moonrise: 4:04pm
Moonset: 12:20am
25

Sunrise: 6:08am
Sunset: 8:11pm
Moonrise: 4:58pm
Moonset: 1:08am
26

Sunrise: 6:10am
Sunset: 8:09pm
Moonrise: 5:48pm
Moonset: 2:06am
27

Sunrise: 6:12am
Sunset: 8:07pm
Moonrise: 6:31pm
Moonset: 3:12am
28

Sunrise: 6:13am
Sunset: 8:04pm
Moonrise: 7:09pm
Moonset: 4:25am
29

Sunrise: 6:15am
Sunset: 8:02pm
Moonrise: 7:43pm
Moonset: 5:43am
30

Sunrise: 6:16am
Sunset: 8:00pm
Moonrise: 8:15pm
Moonset: 7:04am
31

Sunrise: 6:18am
Sunset: 7:58pm
Moonrise: 8:45pm
Moonset: 8:25am

September 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 6:19am
Sunset: 7:56pm
Moonrise: 9:16pm
Moonset: 9:46am
2

Sunrise: 6:21am
Sunset: 7:54pm
Moonrise: 9:49pm
Moonset: 11:05am
3

Sunrise: 6:23am
Sunset: 7:51pm
Moonrise: 10:25pm
Moonset: 12:21pm
4

Sunrise: 6:24am
Sunset: 7:49pm
Moonrise: 11:06pm
Moonset: 1:32pm
5

Sunrise: 6:26am
Sunset: 7:47pm
Moonrise: 11:52pm
Moonset: 2:37pm
6

Sunrise: 6:27am
Sunset: 7:45pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 3:35pm
7

Sunrise: 6:29am
Sunset: 7:42pm
Moonrise: 12:43am
Moonset: 4:24pm
8

Sunrise: 6:30am
Sunset: 7:40pm
Moonrise: 1:39am
Moonset: 5:06pm
9

Sunrise: 6:32am
Sunset: 7:38pm
Moonrise: 2:38am
Moonset: 5:42pm
10

Sunrise: 6:34am
Sunset: 7:36pm
Moonrise: 3:39am
Moonset: 6:12pm
11

Sunrise: 6:35am
Sunset: 7:33pm
Moonrise: 4:41am
Moonset: 6:40pm
12

Sunrise: 6:37am
Sunset: 7:31pm
Moonrise: 5:43am
Moonset: 7:04pm
13

Sunrise: 6:38am
Sunset: 7:29pm
Moonrise: 6:46am
Moonset: 7:28pm
14

Sunrise: 6:40am
Sunset: 7:27pm
Moonrise: 7:47am
Moonset: 7:51pm
15

Sunrise: 6:41am
Sunset: 7:24pm
Moonrise: 8:49am
Moonset: 8:15pm
16

Sunrise: 6:43am
Sunset: 7:22pm
Moonrise: 9:51am
Moonset: 8:40pm
17

Sunrise: 6:45am
Sunset: 7:20pm
Moonrise: 10:53am
Moonset: 9:08pm
18

Sunrise: 6:46am
Sunset: 7:17pm
Moonrise: 11:54am
Moonset: 9:40pm
19

Sunrise: 6:48am
Sunset: 7:15pm
Moonrise: 12:55pm
Moonset: 10:17pm
20

Sunrise: 6:49am
Sunset: 7:13pm
Moonrise: 1:53pm
Moonset: 11:01pm
21

Sunrise: 6:51am
Sunset: 7:11pm
Moonrise: 2:48pm
Moonset: 11:53pm
22

Sunrise: 6:52am
Sunset: 7:08pm
Moonrise: 3:38pm
Moonset: none
23

Sunrise: 6:54am
Sunset: 7:06pm
Moonrise: 4:23pm
Moonset: 12:53am
24

Sunrise: 6:56am
Sunset: 7:04pm
Moonrise: 5:02pm
Moonset: 2:01am
25

Sunrise: 6:57am
Sunset: 7:01pm
Moonrise: 5:38pm
Moonset: 3:15am
26

Sunrise: 6:59am
Sunset: 6:59pm
Moonrise: 6:10pm
Moonset: 4:33am
27

Sunrise: 7:00am
Sunset: 6:57pm
Moonrise: 6:41pm
Moonset: 5:54am
28

Sunrise: 7:02am
Sunset: 6:55pm
Moonrise: 7:12pm
Moonset: 7:16am
29

Sunrise: 7:04am
Sunset: 6:52pm
Moonrise: 7:45pm
Moonset: 8:37am
30

Sunrise: 7:05am
Sunset: 6:50pm
Moonrise: 8:20pm
Moonset: 9:57am

October 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 7:07am
Sunset: 6:48pm
Moonrise: 9:00pm
Moonset: 11:14am
2

Sunrise: 7:08am
Sunset: 6:45pm
Moonrise: 9:46pm
Moonset: 12:24pm
3

Sunrise: 7:10am
Sunset: 6:43pm
Moonrise: 10:36pm
Moonset: 1:27pm
4

Sunrise: 7:12am
Sunset: 6:41pm
Moonrise: 11:32pm
Moonset: 2:20pm
5

Sunrise: 7:13am
Sunset: 6:39pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 3:06pm
6

Sunrise: 7:15am
Sunset: 6:37pm
Moonrise: 12:31am
Moonset: 3:44pm
7

Sunrise: 7:16am
Sunset: 6:34pm
Moonrise: 1:32am
Moonset: 4:16pm
8

Sunrise: 7:18am
Sunset: 6:32pm
Moonrise: 2:34am
Moonset: 4:44pm
9

Sunrise: 7:20am
Sunset: 6:30pm
Moonrise: 3:36am
Moonset: 5:09pm
10

Sunrise: 7:21am
Sunset: 6:28pm
Moonrise: 4:38am
Moonset: 5:33pm
11

Sunrise: 7:23am
Sunset: 6:25pm
Moonrise: 5:40am
Moonset: 5:56pm
12

Sunrise: 7:25am
Sunset: 6:23pm
Moonrise: 6:42am
Moonset: 6:20pm
13

Sunrise: 7:26am
Sunset: 6:21pm
Moonrise: 7:44am
Moonset: 6:44pm
14

Sunrise: 7:28am
Sunset: 6:19pm
Moonrise: 8:46am
Moonset: 7:11pm
15

Sunrise: 7:30am
Sunset: 6:17pm
Moonrise: 9:48am
Moonset: 7:42pm
16

Sunrise: 7:31am
Sunset: 6:15pm
Moonrise: 10:49am
Moonset: 8:17pm
17

Sunrise: 7:33am
Sunset: 6:13pm
Moonrise: 11:47am
Moonset: 8:58pm
18

Sunrise: 7:35am
Sunset: 6:11pm
Moonrise: 12:43pm
Moonset: 9:47pm
19

Sunrise: 7:36am
Sunset: 6:08pm
Moonrise: 1:33pm
Moonset: 10:43pm
20

Sunrise: 7:38am
Sunset: 6:06pm
Moonrise: 2:19pm
Moonset: 11:46pm
21

Sunrise: 7:40am
Sunset: 6:04pm
Moonrise: 2:59pm
Moonset: none
22

Sunrise: 7:42am
Sunset: 6:02pm
Moonrise: 3:35pm
Moonset: 12:55am
23

Sunrise: 7:43am
Sunset: 6:00pm
Moonrise: 4:07pm
Moonset: 2:08am
24

Sunrise: 7:45am
Sunset: 5:58pm
Moonrise: 4:38pm
Moonset: 3:25am
25 DST Ends


Sunrise: 6:47am
Sunset: 4:56pm
Moonrise: 4:08pm
Moonset: 3:45am

26

Sunrise: 6:48am
Sunset: 4:54pm
Moonrise: 4:39pm
Moonset: 5:06am
27

Sunrise: 6:50am
Sunset: 4:52pm
Moonrise: 5:13pm
Moonset: 6:27am
28

Sunrise: 6:52am
Sunset: 4:51pm
Moonrise: 5:51pm
Moonset: 7:46am
29

Sunrise: 6:54am
Sunset: 4:49pm
Moonrise: 6:34pm
Moonset: 9:02am
30

Sunrise: 6:55am
Sunset: 4:47pm
Moonrise: 7:24pm
Moonset: 10:11am
31

Sunrise: 6:57am
Sunset: 4:45pm
Moonrise: 8:19pm
Moonset: 11:11am

November 2015

Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 6:59am
Sunset: 4:43pm
Moonrise: 9:19pm
Moonset: 12:01pm
2

Sunrise: 7:01am
Sunset: 4:41pm
Moonrise: 10:21pm
Moonset: 12:43pm
3

Sunrise: 7:02am
Sunset: 4:40pm
Moonrise: 11:24pm
Moonset: 1:18pm
4

Sunrise: 7:04am
Sunset: 4:38pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 1:48pm
5

Sunrise: 7:06am
Sunset: 4:36pm
Moonrise: 12:27am
Moonset: 2:14pm
6

Sunrise: 7:07am
Sunset: 4:34pm
Moonrise: 1:29am
Moonset: 2:38pm
7

Sunrise: 7:09am
Sunset: 4:33pm
Moonrise: 2:31am
Moonset: 3:01pm
8

Sunrise: 7:11am
Sunset: 4:31pm
Moonrise: 3:33am
Moonset: 3:24pm
9

Sunrise: 7:13am
Sunset: 4:29pm
Moonrise: 4:35am
Moonset: 3:48pm
10

Sunrise: 7:14am
Sunset: 4:28pm
Moonrise: 5:38am
Moonset: 4:14pm
11

Sunrise: 7:16am
Sunset: 4:26pm
Moonrise: 6:40am
Moonset: 4:43pm
12

Sunrise: 7:18am
Sunset: 4:25pm
Moonrise: 7:42am
Moonset: 5:17pm
13

Sunrise: 7:20am
Sunset: 4:23pm
Moonrise: 8:42am
Moonset: 5:57pm
14

Sunrise: 7:21am
Sunset: 4:22pm
Moonrise: 9:39am
Moonset: 6:43pm
15

Sunrise: 7:23am
Sunset: 4:21pm
Moonrise: 10:32am
Moonset: 7:37pm
16

Sunrise: 7:25am
Sunset: 4:19pm
Moonrise: 11:18am
Moonset: 8:37pm
17

Sunrise: 7:26am
Sunset: 4:18pm
Moonrise: 12:00pm
Moonset: 9:44pm
18

Sunrise: 7:28am
Sunset: 4:17pm
Moonrise: 12:36pm
Moonset: 10:54pm
19

Sunrise: 7:30am
Sunset: 4:15pm
Moonrise: 1:08pm
Moonset: none
20

Sunrise: 7:31am
Sunset: 4:14pm
Moonrise: 1:38pm
Moonset: 12:08am
21

Sunrise: 7:33am
Sunset: 4:13pm
Moonrise: 2:07pm
Moonset: 1:23am
22

Sunrise: 7:35am
Sunset: 4:12pm
Moonrise: 2:37pm
Moonset: 2:41am
23

Sunrise: 7:36am
Sunset: 4:11pm
Moonrise: 3:08pm
Moonset: 3:59am
24

Sunrise: 7:38am
Sunset: 4:10pm
Moonrise: 3:43pm
Moonset: 5:18am
25

Sunrise: 7:39am
Sunset: 4:09pm
Moonrise: 4:22pm
Moonset: 6:35am
26

Sunrise: 7:41am
Sunset: 4:08pm
Moonrise: 5:09pm
Moonset: 7:48am
27

Sunrise: 7:42am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 6:02pm
Moonset: 8:54am
28

Sunrise: 7:44am
Sunset: 4:06pm
Moonrise: 7:00pm
Moonset: 9:51am
29

Sunrise: 7:45am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 8:03pm
Moonset: 10:38am
30

Sunrise: 7:47am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 9:08pm
Moonset: 11:17am

December 2015
Stonehenge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1

Sunrise: 7:48am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 10:12pm
Moonset: 11:49am
2

Sunrise: 7:50am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: 11:16pm
Moonset: 12:17pm
3

Sunrise: 7:51am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: none
Moonset: 12:43pm
4

Sunrise: 7:52am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 12:19am
Moonset: 1:06pm
5

Sunrise: 7:53am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 1:21am
Moonset: 1:29pm
6

Sunrise: 7:55am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 2:23am
Moonset: 1:52pm
7

Sunrise: 7:56am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 3:26am
Moonset: 2:17pm
8

Sunrise: 7:57am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 4:28am
Moonset: 2:45pm
9

Sunrise: 7:58am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 5:31am
Moonset: 3:16pm
10

Sunrise: 7:59am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 6:33am
Moonset: 3:53pm
11

Sunrise: 8:00am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 7:32am
Moonset: 4:37pm
12

Sunrise: 8:01am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 8:27am
Moonset: 5:29pm
13

Sunrise: 8:02am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 9:17am
Moonset: 6:29pm
14

Sunrise: 8:03am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 10:01am
Moonset: 7:34pm
15

Sunrise: 8:04am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 10:39am
Moonset: 8:44pm
16

Sunrise: 8:05am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 11:13am
Moonset: 9:57pm
17

Sunrise: 8:06am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 11:43am
Moonset: 11:11pm
18

Sunrise: 8:07am
Sunset: 4:00pm
Moonrise: 12:12pm
Moonset: none
19

Sunrise: 8:07am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 12:40pm
Moonset: 12:26am
20

Sunrise: 8:08am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 1:09pm
Moonset: 1:42am
21

Sunrise: 8:09am
Sunset: 4:01pm
Moonrise: 1:41pm
Moonset: 2:58am
22

Sunrise: 8:09am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 2:17pm
Moonset: 4:14am
23

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:02pm
Moonrise: 2:59pm
Moonset: 5:27am
24

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:03pm
Moonrise: 3:47pm
Moonset: 6:35am
25

Sunrise: 8:10am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 4:43pm
Moonset: 7:36am
26

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:04pm
Moonrise: 5:44pm
Moonset: 8:28am
27

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:05pm
Moonrise: 6:48pm
Moonset: 9:12am
28

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:06pm
Moonrise: 7:54pm
Moonset: 9:48am
29

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 8:59pm
Moonset: 10:19am
30

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:07pm
Moonrise: 10:03pm
Moonset: 10:45am
31

Sunrise: 8:11am
Sunset: 4:08pm
Moonrise: 11:06pm
Moonset: 11:10am

Stonehenge Sunrise and Sunset Times 2015 (Sunrise Sunset Calendar)

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