A NEW exhibition focusing on Stonehenge through the years will be opening today. #Stonehengewishyouwerehere.

1 05 2015

New ‘Stonehengiana’ exhibition created by archeologist Julian Richards displays souvenirs and other ephemera charting history of site as tourist attraction since the 19th century. It has been a place of pilgrimage for many centuries and a tourist attraction probably since Roman times.  Wish You Were Here! takes a look back at how the ‘henge was viewed by previous generations and it provides a glimpse at the iconic role it has played in popular culture.

A new Stonehenge exhibition, Wish You Were Here, reveals the site’s history as a tourist attraction since Victorian times. Photograph: English Heritage/PA

A new Stonehenge exhibition, Wish You Were Here, reveals the site’s history as a tourist attraction since Victorian times. Photograph: English Heritage/PA

From 1st May 2015 explore the ‘Wish You Were Here’ special exhibition in the Stonehenge visitor centre.  Celebrating both the changing ways in which Stonehenge has been experienced by its many visitors, and its status as a world-wide icon, through historical souvenirs, guidebooks, postcards and photographs.

The exhibition features items from the personal collection of Julian Richards and objects on loan from the Wiltshire Museum and The Salisbury Museum.

This is the latest in a regularly changing programme of special exhibitions at the Stonehenge visitor centre. Entry to the exhibition is included in the price of your ticket. Explore previous exhibitions held at Stonehenge.

Wish You Were Here opens on 1st May and runs until March 2016. Admission is included in the Stonehenge entry price.  Visitors are invited to share their experiences on social media with the hashtag #stonehengewishyouwerehere.

Links:
English Heritage. Stonehenge: Things to see and do 
From ‘druidical erection’ to Spinal Tap: a history of Stonehenge as tourist site
New exhibition focuses on Stonehenge through the years
Quirky look at Stonehenge through new Wish You Were Here exhibition

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The Stonehenge Landscape Tour, introduced by Phil Harding: CBA Members’ Event

22 02 2015

Join Time Team favourite Phil Harding and expert guide Pat Shelley for a unique exploration of the Stonehenge landscape at the exclusive Council for British Archaeology (CBA) and English Heritage (EH) members’ event on Sunday 19th April 2015.

EH-Tour

The pair will be leading a walk through some of the often-overlooked enigmatic elements of the landscape, combining rich archaeological background with personal anecdotes and replica artefacts. The walk will take around an hour and a half, and highlights will include round barrows at nearby Fargo Woods and the Cursus barrow group, before visiting the Cursus itself. The culmination of the walk will see our group descending into Stonehenge Bottom before walking up the Avenue to Stonehenge.

CBA and EH members will meet at the Stonehenge Visitor Centre where they can enjoy complimentary refreshments Phil supporting the New YAC Dolls raising money for the Young Archaeologists' Clubbefore beginning the walk at 11.30am. Participants should wear suitable clothing and footwear for the walk, and be of a reasonable level of fitness. Please note that this is a walk around the wider Stonehenge landscape putting the monument into its context, and does not include access into the stones themselves.

Tickets for this CBA and EH members’ event are just £30 per head, and can be booked now via the English Heritage events booking line on: 0370 333 1183. Proceeds from the walk will go towards supporting the work of the Young Archaeologists’ Club (YAC).

Phil Harding is best known and loved as the hat-wearing archaeologist from Channel 4’s Time Team. His expertise lies in© www.tripadvisor.com.au prehistory, and his personal experience and anecdotes – coupled with the opportunity to handle some of his beautiful handmade replica artefacts – will add a unique extra dimension to your walking tour.

Pat Shelley is an experienced independent guide, with years of experience of bringing Stonehenge and its landscape to life. Described on ‘TripAdvisor’ as “the ONLY way to see Stonehenge”, Pat is an engaging speaker who will be only to pleased to share his love of Stonehenge with you, and answer any questions that you might have.

Visit the Council for British Archaeology Website for full details.

Visit the English Heritage website if you are planning to visit Stonehenge

Stonehenge Guided Tours offer frequent tours and many also include ‘Stonehenge Inner Circle Access Tours

The Visit Wiltshire website lists local operators based in Salisbury offering Stonehenge tours

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Soldiers at Stonehenge: A new special exhibition is being launched at the Stonehenge visitor centre in November

4 10 2014

Salisbury Plain and the journey to the First World War.

A new special exhibition is being launched at the Stonehenge visitor centre in November to tell the story of the Stonehenge War memorial at Stonehengelandscape, its neighbouring communities and how they were dramatically altered by the Great War.  During the First World War, the World Heritage Site was at the heart of Salisbury Plain’s military training ground and the Wiltshire landscape was dramatically transformed.  A 25 mile area around Stonehenge became home to the largest complex of military training camps in the world, as soldiers dug intricate networks of trenches in an attempt to replicate conditions on the Western Front.

This exhibition will open in November 2014. It tells the story of the Stonehenge landscape, its neighbouring communities, and how they were changed by the First World War.

Visit the English Heritage Website and see ten of the exhibition objects and images in more detail.

NOVEMBER 11th 2014 EVENT:  Join English Heritage for an insight into the First World War exhibition at Stonehenge with Guest Curator and Historian Simon Jones .  Enjoy a guided tour of the exhibition and discover the story of the soldiers who trained on Salisbury Plain. £22 (visit the English Heritage website)

The Stonehenge News Blog

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18th Century William Stukeley book on Stonehenge is now online.

3 02 2014

In 1740, British vicar William Stukeley published Stonehenge, A Temple Restor’d to the British Druids.

In more than 30 illustrations, Stukeley’s book documents the way Stonehenge appeared when he visited it in the early 18th century. The historian was only the 1-stukely-stonehengesecond scholarly investigator (after the 17th-century antiquarian John Aubrey) to take an interest in the site, and the first to publish a comprehensive account of what he found on his visits,  including images of the way that the monument looked in context of the  surrounding farmland.

In maps and vistas, Stukeley tried to capture the layout of the  monument’s stones. Much of his sense of urgency in the task came from  his belief that the stones’ arrangement needed preservation, as the  monument was under constant threat of vandalism and interference. For  example, Aubrey found and documented 20 stones in one area of the monument; a century later, Stukeley found only five remaining.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre: English Heritage current ‘Set in Stone’ exhibition includes an oil portrait of William Stukeley: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/discover/set-in-stone-exhibition

Link: http://tywkiwdbi.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/1740-book-on-stonehenge-now-online.html
Stonehenge area news on twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

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Sponsored by ‘Stonehenge Guided Tours’ www.StonehengeTours.com





Protests expected in run up to opening of £27m Stonehenge visitor centre

17 12 2013

Two different protests are to be staged at Stonehenge in the run up to the opening of a new £27 million visitor centre on Wednesday.

visitor-centre-2

One protest will involve people living in villages near the A303 who are worried about extra traffic using rural lanes while the other is about the display of human remains in one of the exhibitions in the soon to be open centre.

A spokesman for English Heritage said: “The display of human remains at the exhibition has caused some people who feel very strongly about it to protest on site.

“We respect their views and their right to peaceful demonstration, and have had useful discussions with them about how these protests can be accommodated.

“English Heritage believes that authenticity is important to tell England’s story. We use real objects and artefacts because we believe they are the best way for people to come close to history.

“We only use replicas when the real item is not available. Research shows that the vast majority of museum visitors are comfortable with, and often expect to see, human remains as part of displays.

“Stonehenge is the focus of a ceremonial and ritual landscape shaped by prehistoric people for over 1,500 years. The exhibition puts at its centre the people associated with it and as such, the remains have a rightful place in the exhibition.

“Our position is consistent with current museum practice across the UK and the presentation of human remains in the new gallery will follow strict guidelines set out by the UK Government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport.”

English Heritage Commissioners considered druid leader Arthur Pendragon’s request to use replicas very carefully in September 2013 but decided that the original plan should go ahead.

“The three sets of human remains on display have been in the care of scholarly institutions for at least 10 years and do not include any freshly excavated material,” the spokesman added.

“All the three sets of remains have been scientifically dated: two sets are over 5,000 years old, one set is about 4,500 years old.”

English Heritage says it also respects people’s rights to protest about traffic issues. A spokesman said: “The project has widespread support but traffic problems on the A303 have caused concern in a few local villages.

“We respect people’s right to peaceful demonstration. Together with the police, we have had discussions with the Stonehenge Traffic Action Group (STAG) about how these protests can be accommodated.

“Their main concern is the congestion on the A303 near Stonehenge and the impact this has on nearby villages. Some people consider closing the A344 (a key part of the English Heritage scheme) has made the situation worse, so much so that drivers are abandoning the A303 in search of a faster route through local villages.

“We understand and sympathise with these frustrations, but the reality is that the A303 has long been a very busy road, even before the A344 was closed.

“The majority of traffic congestion on the A303 is caused by the year on year increase of cars using the road and by the bottleneck where the dual-carriageway becomes a single carriageway near Stonehenge.

“We agree that something needs to be done about the A303 but the decision rests with the Department for Transport. We have met with STAG, have discussed the matter with Wiltshire Council and will join with them in urging the Department for Transport to tackle this long standing problem.”

Article source By Joanne Moore: http://www.gazetteandherald.co.uk/news/headlines/10880859.Protests_expected_in_run_up_to_opening_of___27m_Stonehenge_visitor_centre/?ref=rss

Follow all the news on Stonehenge and surrounding area on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

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1913-2013: 100 Years of Protecting the Past.

11 12 2013

This year, the centenary of the 1913 Ancient Monuments Act, will culminate in the opening of English Heritage’s new Stonehenge exhibition galleries and visitor centre on 18th December.

“A Monumental Act”

2013 is the centenary of a landmark moment for England’s heritage.

eh-centenary-logo

The passing of the Ancient Monuments Consolidation and Amendment Act in 1913 recognised for the first time that there are physical remains of the nation’s history which are so special and so significant that the state has a duty to ensure their continued survival.


Preservation Orders and Scheduling

The Act did three new things. It introduced a system whereby the Office of Works could issue a compulsory ‘Preservation Order’ when a monument or building of sufficient ‘historic, architectural, traditional, artistic, or archaeological interest’ was at risk of demolition by a private owner.

Each order would need an Act of Parliament to confirm it, making it an unwieldy instrument, but the Act did at least establish the principle that some buildings in private ownership might, if they were important enough, warrant the intervention of the state to save them.

The second major innovation was the ‘scheduling’ of monuments. This involved compiling a list, or schedule, of monuments which were deemed by an expert board to be of ‘national importance’. Once a site was on the list and the owner informed, it became a crime to damage it.

Under the Act, the Office of Works could give free advice to an owner regarding the treatment of an ancient monument on their land and could oversee any works free of charge. Scheduling considerably widened the scope of protection to the thousands of monuments on private land rather than just those in Government or local authority care.

These two initiatives – the preservation order and scheduling – established the statutory protection of those parts of the nation’s heritage in private hands. It would develop in future years through the listing system and a rapidly evolving planning system.

http://www.stonehengeandaveburywhs.org/assets/Nomination-Document.pdf

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/caring/heritage-centenary/1913-ancient-monuments-act/

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/46

Stonehenge News Blog





Countdown to a New Dawn. New Stonehenge Visitor Centre opening on 18th December 2013

6 12 2013

 

The new Stonehenge visitor centre will open on the 18th December, in time for the winter solstice. Over the festive period you can visit Stonehenge without booking and from 1st February 2014, entrance to Stonehenge will be managed through timed tickets and advance booking is strongly recommended.

For the first time ever at the site, they will be able to learn more about this complex monument in a stunning, museum-quality permanent exhibition curated by English Heritage experts.

“The exhibition will change the way people experience and think about Stonehenge forever”

The £27m project also includes grassing over the A334 alongside the ancient monument and closing another section of the busy road.

Exploring the past: The impressive new visitor centre will open on 18 December

Exploring the past: The impressive new visitor centre will open on 18 December

The visitor centre and museum will be located about a mile-and-a-half from the stones.  Visitors will be shuttled to Stonehenge by a little train, pulled by a Land Rover.

The first part of the long-awaited environmental improvements to Stonehenge will be the unveiling of a new visitor experience. This includes the new visitor centre and exhibition facilities to enhance your visit to the Stones.

A 360-degree virtual, immersive experience will let visitors ‘stand in the stones’ before they enter a gallery presenting the facts and theories surrounding the monument through various displays and nearly 300 prehistoric artefacts.

The archaeological finds on display are on loan from the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes, and the Duckworth Collection, University of Cambridge. All were found inside the World Heritage Site and many are on public display for the first time.

Set in Stone? How our ancestors saw Stonehenge, will be the first special temporary exhibition. It will chart more than 800 years of ideas and debate – from 12th-century legends to radiocarbon dating reports in the 1950s – on who built Stonehenge and when, and features objects on loan from many national museums.

Down the road: An aerial view of the site shows how developers have managed to place the site nearby, without spoiling the immediate surroundings of Stonhenge

Down the road: An aerial view of the site shows how developers have managed to place the site nearby, without spoiling the immediate surroundings of Stonehenge

In Easter 2014, visitors can look forward to the opening of a group of reconstructed Neolithic houses. The Neolithic houses are the highlight of the outdoor gallery and will be built from January 2014 onwards by volunteers based on houses where the builders of Stonehenge may have lived, complete with furniture and fittings.

Advance booking will be available shortly to give you guaranteed entry on the day and at the time of your choice.

Please note: road access to Stonehenge has changed and permits are being issued to vehicles driving on the A344 to Stonehenge until the new visitor centre opens at Airman’s Corner.  Please go to the Directions page for more details.

Stonehenge Links:
http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/
http://www.visitwiltshire.co.uk/explore/stonehenge-and-avebury/stonehenge-visitor-centre
Stonehenge on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

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Multi-million pound Stonehenge visitor centre to open in time for winter solstice

1 10 2013

Visitors to Stonehenge will get the chance to  explore an impressive new visitor centre close to the ancient site later this  year.

English Heritage today announced that the  first phase of its long-awaited £27million improvements  to the area will be launched to the public on 18 December, in time for  winter solstice on 21 December.

Exploring the past: The impressive new visitor centre will open on 18 December

Exploring the past: The impressive new visitor centre will open on 18 December

The new visitor centre will house a permanent  exhibition that will offer visitors the chance to learn more about the famous  monument.

They will be able to ‘stand in the stones’  thanks to a 360-degree virtual experience before they enter a gallery where they  will be able to view nearly 300 prehistoric artefacts and displays that reveal  facts and theories about the ancient monument.

Many of the archaeological finds – which are  on loan from various museums including the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum  – will be on public display for the first time.

Ancient artefacts: A permanent exhibition will feature nearly 300 prehistoric objects

Ancient artefacts: A permanent exhibition will feature nearly 300 prehistoric objects

The first temporary exhibition will chart  over 800 years of theories about who built Stonehenge – from 12th-century  legends to radiocarbon dating reports in the 1950s.

The environmentally-friendly building,  which  has been designed by Denton Corker Marshall,  features a café, shop, dedicated  education space and visitor’s car park, and will offer tourists free audio  guides.

The centre is 1.5 miles from Stonehenge and  visitors will be transported to the monument on a special shuttle  service

Ambitious: The £27million project features three stages, the first of which is the opening of the visitor centre

Ambitious: The £27million project features three stages, the first of which is the opening of the visitor centre

English Heritage’s chief executive Simon  Thurley said: “This world famous monument, perpetually described as a mystery,  finally has a place in which to tell its story.

“The exhibition will change the way people  experience and think about Stonehenge forever – beyond the clichés and towards a  meaningful inquiry into an extraordinary human achievement in the distant  past.”

 

Easy access: The centre will be 1.5 miles from Stonehenge and visitors will be transported between the sites on a shuttle service

Easy access: The centre will be 1.5 miles from Stonehenge and visitors will be transported between the sites on a shuttle service

 

Volunteers will begin work on the  construction of a group of Neolithic houses in January. The buildings, which are  expected to be finished by Easter, will be based on houses where the builders of  Stonehenge may have lived, complete with furniture and fittings.

The final phase of the project – the  restoration of the landscape around Stonehenge – will be completed by next  summer.

The Avenue, Stonehenge’s ancient  processional approach, has been reconnected to the stone circle after  being  severed by the A344 road for centuries.

The £27million project has been financed  almost entirely by Heritage Lottery Fund money (£10million), English Heritage  commercial income and donations.

From 18 December, entrance to the site will  be managed through timed tickets and online booking opens on 2  December at www.english-heritage.org.uk/stonehenge.

Stepping back into the past: Construction of a group of Neolithic houses will begin in January next year

Stepping back into the past: Construction of a group of Neolithic houses will begin in January next year

Stonehenge, which was constructed between  3,000 BC and 1,600 BC, attracts around 900,000 visitors a year, and is  particularly popular during the summer and winter solstice.

It is still shrouded in mystery as nobody is  sure how or why the giant boulders were transported hundreds of miles to be  constructed at the site.

However, scientists now believe that  Neolithic engineers may have used ball bearings in the construction of  Stonehenge.

The same technique that allows vehicles and  machinery to run smoothly today could have been used to transport the monument’s  massive standing stones from Wales to Wiltshire more than 4,000 years ago,  according to the theory.

Full story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2438896/Stonehenge-visitor-centre-open-time-winter-solstice.html
By  Travelmail Reporter

Merlin @ Stonehenge
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Stonehenge visitor centre and museum to open on 18th December 2013

30 09 2013

A new visitor centre at Stonehenge will open in time for the winter solstice, English Heritage has said.

The £27m project also includes grassing over the A334 alongside the ancient monument and closing another section of the busy road.

The visitor centre and museum will be located about a mile-and-a-half (2km) from the stones.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre

The visitor centre and museum will be located about a mile-and-a-half from the stones

Visitors will be shuttled to Stonehenge by a little train, pulled by a Land Rover.

Stonehenge, built between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC, is thought to have been used for a variety of religious ceremonies.

It attracts around 900,000 visitors a year, about 70% of whom come from abroad.

Lorraine Knowle, from English Heritage, said the “beautifully and sensitively designed” centre “fits into the rolling landscape of Salisbury Plain very well”.

“It will give visitors a real sense of anticipation because the building is really just a stepping stone on the way to seeing the monument,” she added.

Also included is a museum which will be lent artefacts found around the stones, from local collections housed in Salisbury and Devizes.

Joe Studholme, from the Salisbury Museum said for the first time visitors to the stones will be able to put the exhibits in context.

“Before people go to the stones they need to know much more about the background. Previously there hasn’t been any background about the story of the stones.

“We’re thrilled to be in partnership with English Heritage and to be able to tell the whole story about Stonehenge and the wonderful area”

Link source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-24329692

Follow developments on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Peek behind the scenes of Stonehenge’s new visitors centre

17 08 2013

RESIDENTS of Wiltshire can peek behind the scenes of Stonehenge’s new visitors centre next month.The main contractor for the development, VINCI Construction UK, will host an Open Doors Weekend on September 27 and 28, for people to learn about the project.

event-stonehenge

The centre is a £27million project led by English Heritage, which aims to achieve the vision set out in the Stonehenge World Heritage Management Plan to restore the dignity of Stonehenge.

The new building is at Airman’s Corner, 11/2 miles from the stone circle, and will include exhibition, education and cafe space.

Low-impact vehicles, carrying up to 900 visitors an hour, will operate a 10-minute shuttle service from the visitor building to the stones.

The centre is due to open in late 2013, when the current facilities will be dismantled and the landscape around the stone circle restored.

The Open Weekend is a nationwide initiative, which invites members of the public to go around a construction site in their area.

It aims to demonstrate the range of career opportunities construction has to offer and the wide variety of skills that come together to make buildings and infrastructure.

Stephen Ratcliffe, director of UK Construction Group, one of the partners in the Open Doors project, said: “It is a unique opportunity for the industry to display the complexity, excitement and scope of modern construction projects.”

Article Source: http://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/10612283.Stonehenge_insight_promotes_modern_building/

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Merlin at Stonehenge
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