Stonehenge experiment to be repeated with ‘lost’ stones

14 11 2014

Another attempt is to be made to solve the mystery of how the largest stones used to build Stonehenge were moved.

The experiment was first carried out in a BBC documentary in 1996

The experiment was first carried out in a BBC documentary in 1996

In 1996, a BBC TV programme aimed to find out how the stones for the largest trilithon were put into place, and how the lintel was placed on top.

Since then the concrete replicas have remained untouched and forgotten about at an army base on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire.

They have now been rediscovered and the experiment will be repeated.

Archaeologist Julian Richards is teaming up with farmer Tim Daw see if modern techniques are any more efficient.

Mr Daw, who farms at All Cannings, near Devizes, and who created the first “Neolithic” long barrow to be built in the UK for 5,500 years, also works part-time at Stonehenge.

He said one of the most popular questions asked by visitors is ‘how were the giant stones moved?’.

“When Julian Richards mentioned there was a life-sized replica of the largest stones at Stonehenge that were looking for a home that we could do some experiments on I said ‘let’s do it’.”

The 45-tonne replicas were used in the BBC documentary Secrets of Lost Empires: Stonehenge, which was broadcast in 1996.

They have remained at Larkhill Camp, about a mile from Stonehenge ever since.

The experiment was partially successful, but now new theories have emerged about how the stones may have been moved.

“The first thing is to collect the stones from Salisbury Plain where they have been languishing for the past 20 years and get them back to my farm,” said Mr Daw.

“Hopefully next year we’ll get some teams of people [to take part in the experiment]”

Mr Daw said different theories had now emerged about how the huge stones could have been moved.

“The experts certainly think they know more. Whether they actually do know more is an interesting question.

“Without trying all the wonderful ideas of how you do it Neolithic style, just using man power – no wheels, no draught animals, no machinery – we can’t tell what is practical and what is just fantasy.”

It is hoped the result of the experiment will be turned into another television programme to air next year.

Full story: BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-30041330

Merlin at Stonehenge
Stonehenge News Blog





Soldiers at Stonehenge: A new special exhibition is being launched at the Stonehenge visitor centre in November

4 10 2014

Salisbury Plain and the journey to the First World War.

A new special exhibition is being launched at the Stonehenge visitor centre in November to tell the story of the Stonehenge War memorial at Stonehengelandscape, its neighbouring communities and how they were dramatically altered by the Great War.  During the First World War, the World Heritage Site was at the heart of Salisbury Plain’s military training ground and the Wiltshire landscape was dramatically transformed.  A 25 mile area around Stonehenge became home to the largest complex of military training camps in the world, as soldiers dug intricate networks of trenches in an attempt to replicate conditions on the Western Front.

This exhibition will open in November 2014. It tells the story of the Stonehenge landscape, its neighbouring communities, and how they were changed by the First World War.

Visit the English Heritage Website and see ten of the exhibition objects and images in more detail.

NOVEMBER 11th 2014 EVENT:  Join English Heritage for an insight into the First World War exhibition at Stonehenge with Guest Curator and Historian Simon Jones .  Enjoy a guided tour of the exhibition and discover the story of the soldiers who trained on Salisbury Plain. £22 (visit the English Heritage website)

The Stonehenge News Blog

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Avebury to Stonehenge. Walking Through History with Tony Robinson.

17 11 2013

Tony Robinson embarks on spectacular walks through some of Britain’s most historic landscapes in search of the richest stories from our past

Tony heads off for a 45-mile walk across Wiltshire to tell the story of life and death in the last centuries of the Stone Age. His route over chalk downlands and Salisbury plain takes him through the greatest concentration of prehistoric sites in Europe.

Tony Robinson at StonehengeFrom Avebury to Stonehenge and from spirituality to engineering, this is a journey through our ancestors’ remarkable development in the latter days of the Neolithic Age.

Windmill Hill near Avebury is the start of his route; with earthworks dating to 4500BC, it’s one of the most ancient sites in Wiltshire. From here, Tony moves on through 2000 years of the ‘New Stone Age’, encountering increasingly complex burial sites and processional routes that have helped make this area both captivating and intriguing.

As he heads south Tony can’t escape the eccentric characters and weird phenomena that have accompanied Wiltshire’s ancient history. Mysterious crop circles and unexplained underground energy sources enliven his visit, but his mind is firmly fixed on the extraordinary array of monuments in his path.

That means listening to the fanciful notions of 18th-century antiquarians, which have a grain of truth at their heart, and grasping the cutting edge of scientific archaeology around Stonehenge, which is finally offering up some astounding answers.

CHANNEL 4: 8PM: Saturday 23rd November 2013

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/walking-through-history/episode-guide

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Wessex Archeology are running a free open day at Barrow Clump with Phil Harding

4 07 2013

Explore Archaeology on Salisbury Plain – 20th July 2013

explore-archaeology-20th-july-2013

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog








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