Amesbury to Stonehenge Solstice Lantern Parade 2016

30 11 2016

The annual lantern parade is back again this year on the 20th December 2016 starting at the Amesbury History Centre 4:45pm.

As usual the route will take the procession through the beautiful grounds of the Amesbury Abbey where we will stop for mince pies and mulled wine before making our way to the ancient spring where the solstice lantern will be waiting for us and our resident druid Frank Somners will perform a service.

amesburylantern-1

Amesbury Lantern Procession along the original “Avenue”

The fading solstice light at Stonehenge is taken and put into the solstice lantern which is kept alight all night to light the darkest night and then taken back to the stones the next morning to extinguish. This is a tradition that started a few years ago and has grown in popularity year on year.

Come and join us and our ancestors in celebrating the solstice. Lanterns are available from the History Centre for £3.50 each and there will be an afternoon of lantern decorating in the centre on the 20th until 3:30pm

Visit their website for more details

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‘Old ones’ reference links 8th century poem to Stonehenge?

23 10 2014

AN ancient poem believed to have been written about Bath could in fact be the earliest writing ever discovered about Stonehenge, according to an academic expert following a presentation last night at the Amesbury History Centre. 

Dr Graeme Davis.jpg-pwrt2Mediaeval language scholar Dr Graeme Davis believes an 8th Century Anglo Saxon poem called “The Ruin” could be the oldest known surviving text in the world to describe the monument.

Although the original manuscript is damaged, Mr Davis has translated the poem and said he was surprised to find references to the standing stones as the “old ones”.

Mr Davis is part of a team studying a constant spring at Blick Mead in Amesbury.

He believes that the Stones and Blick Mead spring could be those referred to in the poem.

The spring caught Mr Davis’ attention during recent visits to Amesbury and led to discussions with the Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust over the interesting history of the area.

A spokesman for the trust said: “Graeme’s interpretation of this poem intriguingly focuses the mind on Stonehenge especially with the reference to a hundred generations passed and the naming of the Stones as “the elders” or “old ones”.

“If the spring is indeed Blick Mead, it reinforces links and unlocks another clue to Amesbury’s significance in British History.

“It is interesting to note the book is recognised as one of the greatest works of the Benedictine revival, for which Amesbury played a major role.”

The full translation can be found on the Amesbury Museum, Heritage Trust Facebook page and the hard copy can be seen at the Amesbury History Centre.

Article source: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk/news/11546570.Is_eighth_century_poem_about_Stonehenge_/

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