Who built Stonehenge? Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales.

3 08 2018

THE formation of Stonehenge is a centuries old mystery but a team of researchers may have just cracked one of Stonehenge’s many enigmas.

The question of Stonehenge’s origin has baffled the public imagination and scientists worldwide for more than a century.

Stonehenge: Scientists have discovered who is buried at the historic and mysterious site

Despite many years of archaeological research, very little is known about who erected stone formation and for what purpose.

Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales

But the scientific community could be on the verge of a major breakthrough thanks to an international collaboration with a group of scientists from the University of Oxford.

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports looked at a number of ancient remains buried at the historic site more some 5,000 to 4,400 years ago.

The study gave a glimpse into the origin of Stonehenge, suggesting the standing stones were transported more than 124 miles (200 km) from a quarry in West  to the Stonehenge site in Wessex.

For year scientists have focused on why Stonehenge was built but never quite looked at who exactly built the stone monument and who was buried at it.

A number of cremated and buried remains are scattered across the Stonehenge site, perhaps some of the poor denizens whose hard work built the structure.

The new investigation examined a total of 25 skulls and bones originally excavated form 56 Stonehenge pits in the 1920s.

Read more:
Stonehenge mystery SOLVED: Who built Stonehenge? Latest study on stone formation REVEALED (Source)
Stonehenge: Origins of those who built world-famous monument revealed by groundbreaking scientific research
Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales
Ground-breaking Science Reveals People Buried at Stonehenge Came from Way Out West

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First Day of spring: Stonehenge crowd gathers for sunrise to celebrate the Spring Equinox.

20 03 2018

The first day of spring has been marked by 1000 revellers who gathered at Stonehenge to watch the sunrise.

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Druids and pagans were joined by a mass of revellers at the ancient monument to celebrate the spring or vernal equinox.

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Open access to the stones was given from first light, 05:45 GMT, by English Heritage which manages the site.

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Celebrating the building of Stonehenge may have been as important to Neolithic people as worshipping there

11 03 2018

Building Stonehenge ‘may have been ceremonial celebration.

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English Heritage will begin moving a replica stone on Friday using teams of volunteers in an “experiential archaeology” project

The arduous task of building Stonehenge may have been part of a ceremonial celebration, claim historians.

The circle in Wiltshire was built more than 4,000 years ago using bluestones from south Wales – a decision which has long baffled experts.

Susan Greaney, from English Heritage, said they now believed that Neolithic people did not want to make “things as easy and quick as possible”.

Building the monument was as important as “its final intended use,” she added.

Experts have tried to discover why the people who built Stonehenge chose to use some stones from the Preseli Hills, about 155 miles (250km) away.

The stones were probably transported via water networks and hauled over land, using a huge amount of labour over the long and difficult journey.

Experts now believe the construction of the monument was just as important to Neolithic people as worshipping in it.

Read the full story (source) on the BBC website

 

Relevant links:
Party like it’s 2500BC: Stonehenge building secrets unearthed – click here

Bonding and booze secrets of Stonehenge exposed: Construction work on ancient monument 5,000 years ago brought people together – click here

Secrets of Stonehenge are bonding and booze – click here

Step into the shoes of Neolithic Man at Stonehenge – Click here

MOVING AND RAISING A STONE: 10th / 11th March 2018 – Click here

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Have you ever wondered what it would have been like for our Neolithic ancestors to bring the giant sarsen stones on the 20 mile journey from Marlborough Downs to Stonehenge?

7 03 2018

Now you can find out at one of our special workshops. Working with a team of other visitors, try your hand at moving and raising a 4 tonne limestone block using ropes, rollers and pulleys.

MOVING AND RAISING A STONE: 10th / 11th March 2018

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DATE: Sat 10 & Sun 11 Mar 2018
TIME: 10.30am, 1pm and 3.30pm

LOCATION: Stonehenge Visitor Centre
SUITABLE FOR: Everyone

 

Vist the English Heritage Website for full details

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Prehistoric Enclosure Found Near Stonehenge

3 02 2018

LARKHILL, ENGLAND —According to a report in The Guardian, a team led by Si Cleggett

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Wessex Archaeology

of Wessex Archaeology has uncovered a series of nine post holes in a causewayed enclosure they say matches the orientation of the circle at Stonehenge. The site is located a short walk from Stonehenge, and dates to between 3750 and 3650 B.C., or about 600 years before a circular ditch and timber posts were first installed at the Stonehenge site. Cleggett suggests the people who built the enclosure at Larkhill may have been the architects of the Stonehenge landscape. “That nine-post alignment could be an early blueprint for the laying out of the stones at Stonehenge,” he said. For more, go to “The Square Inside Avebury’s Circles.”

 

An exhibition at the site gives fresh insight into the builders of Stonehenge, showcasing research that suggests animals were brought from as far afield as northern Scotland to feed the engineers and for lavish midwinter feasts.

The Larkhill dig, which is taking place because the land is being cleared for military housing, has also unearthed some fascinating 20th-century history.

REad the article in the Archaeological Magazine

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