Stonehenge tunnel idea resurrected.

17 01 2012

The idea of building a tunnel under Stonehenge has been resurrected by a consortium of council leaders from across the South West.

Stonehenge tunnel planWiltshire was among the authorities represented at a summit meeting to discuss A303 improvements, organised by Somerset County Council last week.

They discussed ways to raise the £1billion needed to widen the remaining single lane sections of the road between Wiltshire and Devon.

The tunnel, which would have cost more than £500million at the last count, is one of five separate schemes they believe are needed.

Somerset’s leader Ken Maddock believes there is scope to seek new funding in the light of Chancellor George Osborne’s autumn statement, which said that pension funds could be used to fund up to £20billion of infrastructure schemes.

He said: “This is a fabulous opportunity to put a joint bid together that will bring huge benefits to the whole of the West Country.”

The 2.1km tunnel plans were shelved in 2007 after the government said the soaring cost was not justified.

Link: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ – www.StonehengeTours.com

Stonehenge tunnel “Why not plant a hedgerow along the A303 ?  It would reduce road noise, prevent accidents because of people looking at the monument whilst driving and considerable cheaper and quicker”

Anyone agree with me ?

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website





Stonehenge road will close, council confirms

29 12 2011

A ROAD passing by Wiltshire’s most well known landmark will close, it has been confirmed.

Wiltshire Council has accepted the recommendations of planning inspector Alan Boyland to close a section of the A344 to improve the setting of Stonehenge.

The recommendations were made following two public inquiries held earlier this year into English Heritage proposals to return the area to grass as part of plans for a new visitor centre at Airman’s Corner.

The decision comes despite objections from objectors including Orcheston Parish Council and residents who fear extra traffic through the village as a result.

A proposal was also made to close the byways around the ancient monument but this was refused.

Mr Boyland said: “I accept that Wiltshire has a considerably greater length of byways than any other country. This is not however, in itself, a reason for allowing a further loss for recreational motor vehicle users.

“In this case, the loss of a further 7km, particularly given the strategic importance of those routes, and without similar alternative routes being available, would in my view be significantly detrimental to the current users.”

Druid leader King Arthur Pendragon objected to the proposals to close the byways as he said it would be a violation of his human rights not to be able to access the area, particularly during Pagan ceremonies such as celebrations of the solstices and equinox.

However, Mr Pendragon approved of proposals to close part of the A344 to improve the amenity of the area.

The new visitor centre has planning permission and despite funding problems English Heritage hopes it can be completed by 2013

Link: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk/news/9435205.Stonehenge_road_will_close__council_confirms/

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Hidden dimension of Stonehenge revealed

8 12 2011

A project directed by academics at the University of Sheffield has made the archaeology of the world-famous Stonehenge site more accessible than ever before.

StonehengeGoogle Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge is the first application of its kind to transport users around a virtual prehistoric landscape, exploring the magnificent and internationally important monument, Stonehenge.

The application used data gathered from the University of Sheffield´s Stonehenge Riverside Project in conjunction with colleagues from the universities of Manchester, Bristol, Southampton and London. The application was developed by Bournemouth University archaeologists, adding layers of archaeological information to Google Earth to create Google Under-the-Earth.

The unique visual experience lets users interact with the past like never before. Highlights include taking a visit to the Neolithic village of Durrington Walls and a trip inside a prehistoric house. Users also have the opportunity to see reconstructions of Bluestonehenge at the end of the Stonehenge Avenue and the great timber monument called the Southern Circle, as they would have looked more than 4,000 years ago.

The project is funded through Google Research Awards, a program which fosters relationships between Google and the academic world as part of Google’s ambition to organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.

Professor Mike Parker-Pearson from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology said: “Google Under Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge is part of a much wider project led by myself and colleagues at other universities – the Stonehenge Riverside Project – which began in 2003. This new Google application is exciting because it will allow people around the world to explore some of the fascinating discoveries we’ve made in and around Stonehenge over the past few years.”

Archaeological scientist Dr Kate Welham, project leader at Bournemouth University, explained that the project could also be the start of something much bigger:

“It is envisaged that Google Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge could be the start of a new layer in Google Earth. Many of the world’s great archaeological sites could be added, incorporating details of centuries’ worth of excavations as well as technical data from geophysical and remote sensing surveys in the last 20 years.” she said.

Dr Nick Snashall, National Trust Archaeologist at Stonehenge said: “The National Trust cares for over 2,000 acres of the Stonehenge Landscape. Seeing Beneath Stonehenge offers exciting and innovative ways for people to explore that landscape. It will allow people across the globe, many of whom may never otherwise have the chance to visit the sites, to share in the thrill of the discoveries made by the Stonehenge Riverside team and to appreciate the remarkable achievements of the people who built and used the monuments.”

You can download the application from the Google Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge site. The tool is easy to use and requires Google Earth to be installed on your computer.

Notes for Editors:
Google Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge was created at Bournemouth University by Dr Kate Welham, Mark Dover, Harry Manley and Lawrence Shaw. It is jointly directed by Dr Kate Welham and Professor Mike Parker Pearson at the University of Sheffield.

To find out more about the University of Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology, visit: Department of Archaeology

The Stonehenge Riverside Project was a joint collaboration between Universities of Bournemouth, Bristol, Manchester, Sheffield and University College London. It was led by Professor Mike Parker Pearson, University of Sheffield, and co-directed by Professor Julian Thomas, University of Manchester, Dr Joshua Pollard, University of Southampton (formally University of Bristol), Dr Colin Richards, University of Manchester, Dr Chris Tilley, University College London and Dr Kate Welham, Bournemouth University.

This project has been supported by: The Arts and Humanities Research Council, the British Academy, the Royal Archaeological Institute, the Society of Antiquaries, the Prehistoric Society, the McDonald Institute, Robert Kiln Charitable Trust, Andante Travel, University of Sheffield Enterprise Scheme, the British Academy, the National Geographic Society, with financial support from English Heritage and the National Trust for outreach. The project was awarded the Bob Smith Prize in 2004 and the Current Archaeology Research Project of the Year award for Bluestonehenge in 2010.
Links: www.shef.ac.uk/

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merln says: The tool is easy to use and requires Google Earth to be installed on your computer.

Melin @ Stonehenge Stone Cirle
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website








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