Tunnel truths

29 10 2015

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

ICOMOS and UNESCO are visiting Stonehenge this week, to ponder the current set of road tunnel proposals. A lot has changed since we were last thinking about such a tunnel. Despite stories in the press, these changes add up to a much better proposition than the one that had, in principle, been accepted a decade ago.

The government has apparently promised funding for an unprecedented 2.9km-long bored tunnel and further beneficial works. After so many years of failed projects, I still find that promise difficult to believe, welcome as it is. However, I was assured it really is true by National Trust and Historic England representatives on a helpful tour put on for Council for British Archaeology trustees (who kindly invited me along) a couple of weeks ago.

HE-NT mapA 2.9km-long tunnel is (in my opinion) the best of three options, none of which has been examined in detail and for none…

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Heritage experts visit Stonehenge to scrutinise tunnel plans

29 10 2015

PLANS for a 2.9km tunnel under the Stonehenge world heritage site will scrutinised by experts today when they visit the monument.

Heritage experts visit Stonehenge to scrutinise tunnel plans

Heritage experts visit Stonehenge to scrutinise tunnel plans

The government unveiled the proposal last year as part of a £2billion project to dual the A303 from Amesbury to Honiton, Devon.

Heritage officials from Unesco and the International Council on Monuments and Sites (Icomos) were invited to visit the site by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. They will meet with stakeholders including English Heritage and Wiltshire Council.

Ian Wilson from the National Trust said: “They will be spending several days here getting to know the landscape and the outline proposals.

“At the top of our list is agreeing how we can best work together to ensure that any scheme to tackle the blight of the road that dominates the Stonehenge Landscape is located in the right place and designed and built to the specification befitting a world heritage site.”

It is expected further trips will be made to Stonehenge as the plans become finalised.

Kate Davies, general manager of Stonehenge, said: “We’re looking forward to showing the advisors the recent improvements to Stonehenge, especially the removal of the old visitor centre and the grassing over of the A344, and highlighting how removing the A303 from the landscape would improve people’s understanding and enjoyment of the ancient stones and their setting.”

Full Article in the Salisbury Journal
Alex Rennie, Reporter /

The Stonehenge News Blog








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