In line with government guidance, the Stonehenge landscape is now open for local visitors to access for walks.

29 03 2021

In line with government guidance, National Trust countryside space and the Stonehenge landscape is open for local visitors to access for walks. We ask all visitors to follow guidance on social distancing to keep everyone safe. The English Heritage visitor centre is currently closed and will open on 12th April.

Please park considerately, and maintain social distancing on your walk.

This wide and open landscape is perfect for dedicated walkers. You can explore by finding your own routes, or if you prefer you can follow some of the National Trust set walks that take you past some of the most important archaeological sites.

Explore the Stonehenge Landsape on foot
Stonehenge does not stand in isolation, but forms part of a remarkable ancient landscape of early Neolithic, late Neolithic and early Bronze Age monuments. The best way to appreciate Stonehenge is on foot. You can enjoy the impressive Wiltshire countryside while exploring the ancient history that has shaped it. Follow in the footsteps of our ancient ancestors and discover the prehistoric monuments that fill the vast ancient landscape surrounding Stonehenge. Stonehenge has far more than ther stone circle. It encompass unrivalled Neolithic landscapes that contain many other fascinating and unique monuments. You could easily spend a whole day in either part of the World Heritage Site.

How to see the site on an independent walk
Download a National Trust map for one of the following routes and explore for yourself.

  1. Ramble around on a Durrington Walls and Landscape walk and explore the connection between two of the most important henge enclosures in the country in a less-known part of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. View the route
  2. Go on a Durrington Walls to Stonehenge walk and discover the landscape in its full glory from the Bronze Age barrow First World War military railway track, as well as its diverse wildlife and plants. View the route
Look for the National Trust and English Heritage information boards placed at key monuments in the landscape.

Durrington Walls to Stonehenge
This walk explores three major prehistoric monuments, Durrington Walls, the Stonehenge Avenue and the Cursus, all in the heart of the World Heritage Site. You will discover this landscape’s past starting with the monuments built by the first farmers, as well as finding out about its diverse range of wildlife and plants. View the route

A Kings View
A walk that explores the chalk downland at the heart of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. From Bronze Age burial mounds to ceremonial pathways, Britain’s most famous prehistoric landscape is crammed with globally important archaeology. There’s also an array of wildlife to look out for all year round, including hares, deer and birds. View the route.

Sectrets of the Stonehenge Landsacpe
A walk that explores some of the lesser known areas of the Stonehenge landscape with great views of the famous stone circle and some breathtaking archaeology. Within Fargo Woodland there are Bronze Age burial mounds and lots of wildlife to discover as well as a useful information and view point. The chalk grassland supports a wealth of native flora and fauna. View the route

Durrington Walls to King Barrow Ridge
With this walk you will explore the landscape to the east of Stonehenge. You will take in the timber circle of Woodhenge and Durrington Walls henge, the Cuckoo Stone and the burial mounds on King Barrow Ridge. All of these sites played an important part in the story of the World Heritage Site at Stonehenge. View the route

Stonehenge Landscape Winterbourne Stoke barrows
Wide, open spaces, fresh air and a deep connection with history. This short dog friendly walk takes in thousands of years of history, with amazing views in a landscape rich in wildflowers, insects, animals and birds. View the route

Walking in Wiltshire
With around 8,200 paths and almost half the county designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, walks in Wiltshire has never been better. Visit Wiltshire

Wiltshire Walks
The county is rich with ancient history, including the world famous stone circles at Stonehenge and Avebury – The Walking Moon Raker

Wiltshire Walks App
The ‘Wiltshire Walks’ app is now available for iPhone and Android and includes over 150 GPS guided walking routes in and around Wiltshire. The app can be downloaded by simply searching for ‘Wiltshire Walks’ on the app stores or by visiting the website. Download the app here

Wiltshire Rural and Leisure walking
Walking through Wiltshire’s Countryside really shows you rural England at its best – Connecting Wiltshire

Stonehenge Walking Tours
The best way to approach Stonehenge is on foot across the landscape with an expert local tour guide. Stonehenge Walks

Stonehenge from Amesbury Walk
This 6-mile circular walk crosses sweeping downland, passes important prehistoric sites and visits the world-famous Stone Circle at StonehengeWiltshire. The Outdoor Guide

Wiltshire Guided Walking Tours.
A new guided tour to help you discover our countries’ most prehistoric wonders. The Stonehenge and Salisbury Tour Company

Relevant Stonehenge Links:
English Heritage – Interactive Maps of the Stonehenge Landscape – click here
Forget sitting in traffic – you should walk to Stonehenge insteadThe Telegraph
Ticking Stonehenge off your bucket list. Stonehenge News Blog – Click here
Stonehenge Guided Tours – The Stonehenge Touring Experts – click here
5 Ways to Visit Stonehenge for Free – The Portable – click here
National Trust – The Stonehenge Landscape – click here

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