Neolithic New Year Walk – Stonehenge Landscape

28 12 2012

Welcome in 2013 with a walk around the ancient monuments of the Stonehenge Landscape. Booking essential.

Stonehenge Landscape ToursAncient ceremonial landscape of great archaeological and wildlife interest

Within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle.

Walking across the grassland, visitors can discover other prehistoric monuments, including the Avenue and King Barrow Ridge with its Bronze Age burial mounds.

Nearby, Winterbourne Stoke Barrows is another fascinating example of a prehistoric cemetery. While Durrington Walls hides the remains of a Neolithic village.

The best approach to the famous stone circle is across Normanton Down, a round barrow cemetery dates from around 2600 to 1600BC.





Ancient Stonehenge ceremonial landscape midwinter Walk

11 12 2012

Ancient ceremonial landscape of great archaeological and wildlife interest

Within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle.

Stonehenge Landscape ToursWalking across the grassland, visitors can discover other prehistoric monuments, including the Avenue and King Barrow Ridge with its Bronze Age burial mounds.

Nearby, Winterbourne Stoke Barrows is another fascinating example of a prehistoric cemetery. While Durrington Walls hides the remains of a Neolithic village.

The best approach to the famous stone circle is across Normanton Down, a round barrow cemetery dates from around 2600 to 1600BC.

National Trust Link: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehengelandscape/
More Stonehenge Landscape Tours: http://stonehengetours.com/stonehenge-prehistoric-wessex-walking-tour.htm

 

Stonehenge news blog sponosred by ‘Stonehenge Guided Tours

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Leap Year Lark – Stonehenge Landscape Tour 29th February

29 02 2012

Make the most of your extra day with a lovely long walk in the outdoors!

Celebrate the leap year with a walk in the Neolithic and Bronze Age Stonehenge landscape. Your guide will take you on a circuit of around 5 miles over the downs, exploring some of the less visited monuments that together form the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. Bring your binoculars and keep an eye out for hares and winter birds too.
We’re meeting in the Stonehenge Car Park SP4 7DE (not NT), at the two ‘touching stones’ at the top of the slope that leads down towards the Stonehenge Cafe. Please dress for the weather and wear stout footwear. Wrap up warm – it gets chilly up on the downs! Access is by pedestrian and farm gates; the terrain is mostly grassland and trackways, uneven underfoot.
Accessible W.C. in car park. Accompanied children welcome, free. Dogs on leads welcome.
Booking Essential 0844 249 1895. A 5% booking fee applies. Phone lines are open Mon to Fri 9am-5.30pm, plus Sat and Sun 9am-4pm.
Stonehenge Landscape
Amesbury, Salisbury
Wiltshire
SP4 7DETel: +44 (0) 844 249 1895

Day Opening Times
Wednesday 11:00 – 15:00

SPONSORED BY ‘THE STONEHENGE TOUR COMPANY’ – WWW.STONEHENGETOURS.COM

Merlin says “Get some fresh air and enjoy the Wilstshire Landscape – next one in 4 years”

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Stonehenge Tour – Ancient ceremonial landscape of great archaeological and wildlife interest

16 02 2012

Explore the wider Stonehenge World Heritage Site with a guide and discover hidden histories, ancient mysteries and winter wildlife. February 18th 2012

Stonehenge landscapeWithin the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle.

Walking across the grassland, visitors can discover other prehistoric monuments, including the Avenue and King Barrow Ridge with its Bronze Age burial mounds.

Nearby, Winterbourne Stoke Barrows is another fascinating example of a prehistoric cemetery. While Durrington Walls hides the remains of a Neolithic village.

The best approach to the famous stone circle is across Normanton Down, a round barrow cemetery dates from around 2600 to 1600BC.





Stonehenge Landscape Tour – Winter archaeology walk

31 01 2012

Stonehenge snow sceneWinter archaeology walk – Saturday, 04 February 2012

Explore the wider Stonehenge World Heritage Site with a guide and discover hidden histories, ancient mysteries and winter wildlife.

Enjoy a winter afternoon walk up on the downs learning about the ancient archaeology of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site and the area’s varied wildlife. On this three mile walk with views of the stone circle, we’ll visit ancient earthworks that have revealed much about the people who once lived and celebrated here. Talking points include the Cursus, the many and varied barrows, and an ancient avenue connecting ceremonial centres

NOTES:

Sponsored by ‘The Sonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Melin says “This is a great tour of the Stonhenege landscape by The National Trust’

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Stonehenge news. Seven Wonders of the Ancient World ?

16 08 2011

Stonehenge may not be one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, but that’s probably only because Heroditus never came to Britain. If he came here now, he’d be appalled by the site of the stones – sandwiched as they are between two busy main roads, a car park complete with portaloos, and a visitor centre that makes you wish you were visiting something else.

A “national disgrace” is what a committee of MP’s called it more than a decade ago, and nothing much has changed since then. Until now that is. After years of wrangling over a series of schemes involving tunnels, by-passes and road closures, the Government believes it may finally have a plan that does Stonehenge justice. Others, including several prominent archaeologists, are not so sure and have set up The Stonehenge Alliance to fight the proposals.

When Sir Jocelyn Stevens took the reigns at English Heritage in 1992. He vowed to make Stonehenge his top priority, to “sort out” the mess of roads criss-crossing the site, and the inappropriate and inadequate visitor facilities that had been branded a national disgrace by the Public Accounts Committee:
From the top of the King Barrows Ridge heading south on the A303 it’s easy to see what the problem is. The road itself, and the smaller A344 that forks off to the right, dominate the landscape as the raised bowl in which Stonehenge sits opens out in front of you. The view of the stones is a good one – and is much appreciated by motorists – but it’s hardly an appropriate setting for such an historic monument.

Buried in the down right beside the stones themselves the bunker-like concrete visitor centre, with it’s shop, ticket office, take-away cafe, and portaloos, is little better. Everyone agrees something must be done. The question is what?

Earlier plans, for a 4 kilometre tunnel bored under the entire site were rejected by the then Conservative government in 1996 on the grounds of cost. The current proposal, the “master plan” as it’s called, is backed by both English Heritage and the National Trust which owns much of the land. The idea is to bury the A303 in a 2 kilometre cut-and-cover tunnel, to close and green-over the A344, and to re-locate and improve the visitor facilities at a site outside the boundary of the World Heritage Site:

Kate Fielden, is a founding member of the Stonehenge Alliance. The problem with the master plan is that a shorter tunnel, although missing the stones, would both start and finish well within the boundaries of the wider World Heritage Site. Opting for cut and cover construction rather than a bored tunnel would more than halve the cost, but means digging up the ground along its entire length. An act of archaeological vandalism the alliance says beggars belief:

And the Stonehenge Alliance is not alone. In July ICOMOS, the International Council on Monuments and Sites, urged the Government to “pay due regard to the World Heritage Site as a whole, and not just that part closest to the stones”. And now even the National Trust’s support for the scheme is under attack from within. A motion before this month’s AGM calls on the charity to abandon its position. The Trust’s Mark Harold accepts the master plan is far from perfect, but he believes, its a good compromise:

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehehenge Tour Company’ – www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website





Stonehenge is a landing strip.

5 04 2011

Aircraft at Stonhenge for first time in 90 years

AIRCRAFT landed at the former Stonehenge airfield on Friday for the first time in 90 years.

Stonehenge landing strip

Stonehenge landing

The event was arranged by the National Trust to commemorate the centenary of the formation of the first British military aeroplane unit.

Although overcast weather and strong winds hampered the occasion, three Auster planes, the oldest dating back to 1942, did manage to land.

A number of other planes including some replica First World War aircraft were due to take part but were unable to take off because of the conditions.

The airfield, RFC Stonehenge, was part of the Royal Flying Corps, although part of the site was also used by the Royal Naval Air Service as RNAS Stonehenge.

It became part of the Royal Air Force when it was formed in 1918 and the airfield remained open until March 1921.

The fly-in commemorated the formation of No 2 (Aeroplane) Company, Air Battalion, Royal Engineers which was formed at Larkhill on April 1, 1911.

“We are delighted to bring this aspect of the history of Stonehenge to life again, with the fly-in by this wonderful collection of aircraft,” said Stonehenge project officer Lucy Evershed.

National Trust volunteer guide Ted Mustart added: “Although No 2 Company was based at Larkhill, much of their flying in 1911 and 1912 was over the Stonehenge landscape.

“The Austers which have visited were used in the same roles as those of the first military aeroplanes – scouting, artillery co-operation and liaison in the period immediately after World War II.”

The National Trust has also organised a series of walks revealing the aviation history of the Stonehenge landscape.

The Wings over Stonehenge walks have taken visitors to the former airfield and more walks are planned for the summer, including one commemorating the first fatal military aircraft accident.

More information is available at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehengelandscape
http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website








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