Stonehenge Landscape. Events and Tours – August 2012

28 07 2012

Summer Stonehenge archaeology walk (4th / 18th August 2012)

Discover the wider Stonehenge World Heritage Site with a guide and discover hidden histories, ancient mysteries, and downland wildlife.

Stonehenge Landscape ToursExplore the downs in summer with an afternoon walk up on the downs to visit the ancient archaeology and varied wildlife of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. On this three mile walk with views of the Stone Circle, we’ll visit ancient earthworks that have revealed much about the people who once lived and celebrated here. Talking points include the Cursus, the many and varied barrows, an ancient avenue connecting ceremonial centres, and a rich diversity of wildlife.

  • Dress for the weather – bring a hat and sunscreen as there’s little shade out on the downs – and wear stout footwear. You may like to bring a cooling drink and a snack.
  • Meeting at the Stonehenge car park SP4 7DE (not NT) by the two ‘touching stones’ at the top of the slope that leads down towards the Stonehenge Cafe.
  • Dogs on leads welcome
  • Accompanied children welcome, free
  • Although your guide will tell you about it, this walk doesn’t visit the Stone Circle. You might like to visit it before or after the walk; NT members are admitted free.
  • Access is by pedestrian and farm gates; the terrain is mostly grassland and trackways, often uneven underfoot. Cattle and sheep graze the gently sloping downs.

Durrington Walls to Stonehenge… and back again! (9th August 2012)

Join this walk to imagine yourself walking in the footsteps of Neolithic revellers…

Explore the Stonehenge World Heritage Site and especially the close connections between the two great henge monuments of Durrington Walls and Stonehenge. Your guide will take you on a circuit of around 6 miles over the downs, also exploring some of the less visited monuments that together form the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

 

  • Please dress for the weather and wear stout footwear. Wrap up warm ‘ it gets chilly up on the downs!
  • Meeting at Woodhenge Car Park (not NT) (SP4 8LR) – take turn-off signed to Woodhenge from A345 between Amesbury and Durrington. Parking at own risk. No parking charge.
  • Dogs on leads welcome
  • Accompanied children welcome, free
  • Access is by pedestrian and farm gates; the terrain is mostly grassland and trackways, often uneven underfoot. Cattle graze the gently sloping downs. Toilets in Stonehenge Car Park (on walk route).

Stargazing and storytelling, meteors and myths

Discover the night sky through telescopes and exciting myths and legends. (15th August 2012)

Join our friendly team of astronomers for an adventure exploring the night sky with telescopes, alongside legends told by our own starry storyteller, activities, and toasting marshmallows. As well as learning about the constellations, we hope the Perseid Meteor Shower will be putting on a show! Telescopes and expertise are provided by Chipping Norton Amateur Astronomy Group, storytelling with Lizzie Bryant.

  • Bring a torch. Wrap up warm – we recommend plenty of layers, gloves, scarf and a hat – and wear stout footwear. Bring your own seating and blankets. You may like to bring a drink and a snack, too.
  • Meeting on byway 12, close to the Stonehenge Car Park (which will be closed when the event starts) parking at own risk – OS grid reference SU 120 424, postcode SP4 7DE.
  • Ideal for accompanied children, 8 years and up
  • Access is by pedestrian and farm gates; the terrain is grassland, and trackways that are uneven underfoot and sometimes potholed.

Wings over Stonehenge – Military Airplane Competition centenary walk

This walk will commemorate the centenary of the Military Aeroplane Competition held at Lark Hill in August 1912 in which Colonel Sam Cody’s bi-plane ‘The Cathedral’ was the outright winner.

Walk in the slipstream of the early pioneer military aviators at Larkhill. See where the Bristol Boxkite made its first flight in 1910 and where the first British military aeroplane unit was formed in 1911. These walks will cover how aviation developed on Lark Hill from 1909-1914 and how military aviation ‘took off’around Stonehenge from 1914-1918. These walks aim to recreate the period with contemporary photographs and maps and include viewing the early hangars and crash sites.

  • Please dress for the weather and wear stout footwear. You are welcome to bring a snack and a drink to enjoy on the walk.
  • Meeting on Wood Road, Larkhill, grid reference SU143438; the post code is SP4 8LX.
  • Accompanied older children welcome, free
  • Access is by pedestrian and farm gates; the terrain is public roads, as well as grassland and trackways, uneven underfoot.

More Information: Lucy Evershed,             01980 664780      stonehenge@nationaltrust.org.uk

Booking Essential            0844 249 1895
A 5% booking fee applies. Phone lines are open Mon to Fri 9am-5.30pm, plus Sat and Sun 9am-4pm.
Booking Fee Applies
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/

Merlin says  “These are truly great events and need to be booked in advance”

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle website





Circle of light: how Stonehenge shapes a landscape

17 07 2012

Jonathan Jones continues his story of British art in pictures with a look at the mystical monument on Salisbury Plain that has haunted the British imagination for centuries
Stonehenge Art 

Stonehenge is a circle that shapes a landscape. The hills and valleys around it seem to radiate from it. Shaped and mounted between 3,000 and 2,500BC in a powerful architecture of pillar and lintel, its stones define geometry, mathematics, the power of the mind. It has haunted the British imagination. The medieval chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth claimed Merlin brought the stones from Ireland; the romantic artists Blake and Constable powerfully pictured this mystic place

Photographer: Patrick Eden /Alamy
Source Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/picture/2012/jul/16/stonehenge-shapes-landscape-british-art

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com 

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Olympic torch: Michael Johnson takes flame to Stonehenge

12 07 2012

Michael Johnson has carried the Olympic flame on a dawn visit toStonehenge before the start of day 55 of the torch relay on Thursday.

Michael Johnson carried the torch around Stonehenge

Michael Johnson carried the torch around Stonehenge

The sprint legend took his torch to the World Heritage Site as the sun rose.

He will start the relay at 07:49 BST and it travels from Salisbury across Dorset to the fossil mecca of the Jurassic Coast

It ends up at the Olympic sailing venues of Portland and Weymouth for a boat trip into Lyme Bay.

A total of 116 runners will carry the torch on a 107-mile route.

After an early start to the day at the ancient stones – scene of a fire garden Cultural Olympiad event on Tuesday – the torch will travel back to Salisbury, where the world 400m record holder and four-times Olympic gold medal winner will set off the relay from Cathedral Green.

The convoy goes from Salisbury to Wilton then through the Wiltshire villages of Barford St Martin, Fovant and Ludwell, where it will pass the famous chalk regimental badges cut into the hillside.

Source Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18802568

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Stonehenge upgrade to finally begin

8 07 2012

Work to improve the environment of Stonehenge gets under way next week – after decades of wrangling and many millions spent on schemes and consultations that came to nothing

The A344 is due to close in April 2013 and the new visitor centre to open in autumn 2013

The A344 is due to close in April 2013 and the new visitor centre to open in autumn 2013

“It’s the official start,” said Renée Fok of English Heritage, which manages   the World Heritage Site. “Things are finally getting done.”

The mysterious monument in Wiltshire is one of the most famous tourist sites   in the world. Each year it receives more than a million visitors, half of   them from overseas. But while the stones themselves continue to amaze,   Stonehenge’s setting and facilities have come in for withering criticism.   Simon Jenkins, the chairman of the National Trust, has called the site a   “national disgrace”.

The principal problem is that Stonehenge is beset by traffic and roads – the   always-busy A303, and the A344 that branches from it and passes close to the   stone circle. The car parks become overcrowded in summer and the visitor   centre is dated. Under the new scheme, which will cost £27 million, English   Heritage promises “a landscape transformed”.

The keystone of the project is the closure of the A344, part of which will be   grassed over. The existing buildings and car parks will be removed and a new   “energy-efficient” visitor centre built, with a shop, café, “education   space” and galleries. An adjacent coach and car park will be built 1½ miles   west of the stones at Airman’s Corner.

A shuttle service will take visitors to the stones, and people will have the   option of walking all or part of the way.

The scheme has received cautious approval. Nigel Swift, the chairman of   Heritage Action, which is dedicated to the conservation of Britain’s   prehistoric sites, expressed “sheer relief and gratitude that a nightmare   that has lasted for many decades is over”.

Frank Somers of the Amesbury and Stonehenge Druids, who regard the site as a   temple, said he was “broadly happy that some improvements are finally   scheduled to happen”.

The A344 is due to close in April 2013 and the new visitor centre to open in   autumn 2013. The area of the existing buildings will be returned to grass by   the summer of the following year. Stonehenge will remain open during the   building work. For more information, visit www.english-heritage.org.uk/stonehenge.

Aricle by By  – Telegraph

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Compan’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin says “All good for wiltshire tourism”
Merlins @ Stonehenge Stone Circle





Stonehenge goes on tour. Bouncy ‘Sacriledge’ comes to Wiltshire

19 06 2012

Stonehenge goes on tour – Sacrilege by Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller set to travel to London and around the country as part of 2012 celebrations and on Friday 29th June will be at Marlborough Common, Wiltshire

The once-in-a-lifetime experience of having an Olympic bounce on a replica of the world’s most famous standing stones is also FREE.

The once-in-a-lifetime experience of having an Olympic bounce on a replica of the world’s most famous standing stones is also FREE.

‘Sacrilege’ is a life-size inflatable replica of Stonehenge, created by Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller and is part of the Cultural Olympiad.
Jeremy Deller said: ‘A lot of my work deals with history, and Sacrilege is no exception, this is a way to get reacquainted with ancient Britain with your shoes off.’

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: ‘You don’t have to be a specialist in ancient British history or an acolyte of the summer solstice ritual to be aware of the unending fascination that Stonehenge continues to inspire around the world. Jeremy Deller’s Sacrilege is a wonderfully witty, quite literal leap into that history and a fantastic example of the irreverence that are hallmarks of our great British humour and our incomparable artists. I have no doubt it will be a great hit with Londoners as well as visitors to the capital.’

Ruth Mackenzie, Director, London2012 Festival, said: ‘Jeremy Deller’s life-sized inflatable replica of Stonehenge popping up in National Botanic Garden in Carmarthenshire will be a fantastic opening event for the London 2012 Festival in Wales. The work embodies many of the values of the London 2012 Festival – it is a once in lifetime event, it is a remarkable piece of art by a world renowned artist, and it is free for everyone to enjoy. With thanks to Arts Council England and the Mayor’s office this work will travel around the UK and London, popping up to delight London 2012 Festival audiences throughout the summer.’

Full list of tour venues follows. For individual enquiries relating to each venue, press contacts are listed on the Sacrilege website press page. For further details: www.sacrilege2012.co.uk

Sponsored by ‘The Stonhenge Tour Company’ www.Stonehenge Tours.com

Merlin says “Wish it could have been at the 2012 Summer Solstice”

Merlin at Stonehenge





SUMMER SOLSTICE AT STONEHENGE 2012 – CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

9 06 2012

Stonehenge is an ancient pre-historic site. It has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Summer Solstice since time immemorial.

Stonehenge Summer Solstice

Stonehenge Summer Solstice

English Hege is pleased to be providing Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for the Summer Solstice. Please help us to create a peaceful occasion by taking personal responsibility and following the Conditions of Entry and guidelines set out on the following pages. We have a duty of care to ensure public safety and are responsible for the protection of Stonehenge and its surrounding Monuments. If we are to ensure that future access is sustainable, it is essential that everyone observes and abides by these Conditions of Entry.

CELEBRATING THE SUMMER SOLSTICE AT STONEHENGE
During the Summer Solstice access to Stonehenge, we support all individuals and groups conducting their own forms of ceremony and celebration providing that they are mutually respectful and tolerant of one another. It is a place seen by many as a sacred site – therefore please respect it and those attending. English Heritage continues to work closely with the many agencies and people from all sectors of the community and we would like to thank them for their help and support. Parking and entry to the Monument will be free, subject to the Conditions of Entry. Please do not arrive at the Solstice Car Park or Stonehenge in advance of the opening times listed below:

TIMINGS FOR SUMMER SOLSTICE AT STONEHENGE

SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS
1900 hours (7pm) Wednesday 20th June
ACCESS TO STONEHENGE
1900 hours (7pm) Wednesday 20th June
LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK
0600 hours (6am) Thursday 21st June
STONEHENGE CLOSES
0800 hours (8am) Thursday 21st June
SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED
1200 hours (12 Noon) Thursday 21st June – see the pages on Travel and Parking for further information on travel and parking arrangements.

WE HOPE THE WEATHER WILL BE KIND AND WISH YOU A PEACEFUL AND CELEBRATORY SOLSTICE.
Sunset and sunrise occur at the following times:
Sunset on Wednesday 20th June 2012 is at 2126 hrs (9.26pm)
Sunrise on Thursday 21st June 2012 is at 0452 hrs (4.52am)
ADMISSION TO STONEHENGE

Admission to the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge is free of charge.
Children under 16 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.
Please remember that you will not be allowed access to the Monument with the following items:
– Large quantities of alcohol
– Drugs
– Large bags or rucksacks (or similar items)
– Sleeping bags or duvets
– Flaming torches, Chinese lanterns or candles
– Dogs (with the exception of registered assistance dogs), pets or other creatures
– Camping equipment, including foldaway chairs, garden furniture
– BBQs or gas cylinders
– Glass/bottles or other glass objects
– Trolleys, wheel barrows or any other form of porterage
– Pushchairs or buggies that are not exclusively used for a child

GLASS
Glass is not allowed at the Monument as many people walk barefoot and, in addition, livestock and wildlife also graze in the area. If you bring any glass items with you, they will be confiscated.

ALCOHOL
Drunken, disorderly, and anti-social behaviour will not be tolerated; ejection, possibly by the Police without return, will be the outcome. Only small amounts of alcohol for personal use will be permitted on to site. Alcohol is limited to no more than the equivalent of four 500ml cans of beer/cider or 75cl of wine. No further alcohol will be permitted on subsequent re-entry. Be warned, drug/alcohol cocktails can be lethal, so please be fully of aware of what you are doing.

DRUGS
Illegal drugs are still illegal at Stonehenge as they are anywhere else. The police will be on site during the access period and will take immediate action against anyone breaking the law. Summer Solstice is not a good time to experiment with drugs – the crowd, the noise and the sheer size of the place are likely to make any bad reaction much, much worse. As much of the access is at night, if you had a bad reaction it may be difficult to locate you to administer treatment.

MUSIC
Stonehenge is a world renowned historic Monument and it is seen by many who attend as a sacred site. Amplified Music is inappropriate and will not be permitted.

CAMPING AND FIRES
Camping, fires, chinese lanterns, flaming torches, BBQs and fireworks are NOT permitted at Stonehenge, in the Solstice Car Park, or anywhere in the surrounding National Trust land. Please see Useful information for further details of local campsites.

SAFETY
Do not climb or stand on any of the stones – this includes the stones that have fallen. This is in the interest of personal safety, the protection of this special site and respect for those attending. As well as putting the stones themselves at risk, climbing on them can damage the delicate lichens. In order to ensure personal safety, random searching may be undertaken, but we hope that self-policing and personal responsibility will prevail. Any items that might be used in an illegal or offensive manner will be confiscated.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/summer-solstice/conditions-entry/

Merlin says “Stonehenge is  a sacred site – please respect it and please respect each other “

Sponsored by ‘The Sonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge





View Stonehenge and other ancient cultural sites up close with Google’s new World Wonders Project

1 06 2012

Google launched the World Wonders Project on  Thursday, a new site that gives users the chance to see ancient and cultural  sites around the world up close.

Google’s Street  View has proved to be an invaluable tool for those people curious about the  world beyond their front door. Since its launch five years ago, the service has  traveled the world mapping roads, railways, parks,  airports, malls and even parts of the Amazon  basin.

And now the company has given us yet another excuse not to venture from the  confines of our cosy couch with the introduction of a new feature: the World Wonders Project.

Announced on Thursday in a post on the Mountain View  company’s official blog, the project offers up 132 ancient and cultural sites  spanning 18 countries. The World Wonders Project uses Street View technology to  allow users to get an up close view of the locations, which include the UK’s  Stonehenge, archaeological areas of Pompeii in Italy and ancient temples in  Japan’s former capital, Kyoto.

Some nice little bonuses come with Google’s new offering. Its Stonehenge  pictures, for example, take you right in among the stones — something you can’t  do if you visit in person, as a rope cordon around the ancient monument has been  in place for the last 35 years.

“Most could not be filmed by car, so we used camera-carrying trikes to pedal  our way close enough,” Melanie Blaschke, product marketing manager of the World  Wonders project, explained in the blog post.

To enhance the experience, the site offers 3D models and YouTube videos  relating to each location.

“We also partnered with several prestigious organizations, including UNESCO,  the World Monuments Fund, Getty Images and Ourplace, who provided official  information and photographs for many of the sites,” Blaschke wrote, adding “World Wonders is part of our commitment to preserving culture online and making  it accessible to everyone.”

Google hopes World Wonders will prove particularly popular with students and  scholars, and has even put together a number of educational packages for use in  the classroom.

So if you feel like enjoying some of the world’s ancient sites without  actually having to physically travel to them, or if time and money are a bit on  the tight side just now, the World Wonders Project could be well worth checking  out.

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ – www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin sayes “Great, no need to get off my sofa?????”

Merlin @ Stonehenge





Olympic Torch will be at Stonehenge on July 12th 2012

19 05 2012

The Olympic torch procession will pass Stonehenge on July 12 then en route to the opening ceremony of London 2012.

On 22 May it will enter Wiltshire at Trowbridge before travelling to Bradford-on-Avon.Olympic Torch

Day 4 – 22 May

Then on 23 May it will visit Chippenham, Calne, Marlborough, Chiseldon, Wroughton, Royal Wootton Bassett and Swindon.

It will return on 11 July going through Ludgershall, Tidworth, Amesbury, The Winterbournes and Salisbury.

An evening event is planned in Salisbury which civic leaders say will “showcase the city to the world”.

Then on 12 July it will leave Salisbury passing through Wilton, Barford St Martin, Fovant on its route to Weymouth.

London 2012 – One extraordinary year

The journey through Wiltshire is part of a 70-day tour across the UK before the torch arrives at London’s Olympic Stadium for the opening ceremony on 27 July when the last relay runner will transfer it from their torch to the Olympic cauldron.

It will then continue to burn until it is extinguished on the final day of the Games.

Thousands of torchbearers have been recruited for the flame’s journey before the opening ceremony.

Each torchbearer will wear a white and gold uniform which has been designed for the occasion by Adidas.

IMPORTANT: The decision does mean, however, the public will not be able to descend on Stonehenge to see the once-in-a-lifetime moment it is carried around the Neolithic monument.

Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-17375974

Sponsored by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin says “All good for Wiltshire Tourism”
Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Prehistoric Wiltshire. Sites of Significance

1 05 2012

If you are in doubt about the key role Wiltshire plays in the long history of these Islands, and that it has done so since the time humans first set foot on our soil, this book joins the growing scholarly titles from the excellent ‘heritage; publisher Amberley Publishing will dispel it.

Prehistoric Wilsthire

Prehistoric Wilsthire

This attractive book is the latest in a successful series from the Stroud-based publisher Amberley. (Amongst others, their titles include Prehistoric Gloucestershire by Tim Darvill, and John Aubrey and Stone Circles: Britain’s First Archaeologist by Aubrey Burl.) It is well written by a knowledgeable local archaeologist in a style that is pleasingly free of jargon, and opens with a fitting tribute from Francis Pryor.

As with some other titles in the series, this pocket-sized book is specifically designed as a field guide (at 235 x 165mm it is slightly larger than A5), in this instance describing nearly 50 of the most visible and accessible prehistoric monuments within the county of Wiltshire. The selected sites are grouped by topographic region (the Marlborough Downs, the Vale of Pewsey and so on), the majority situated on the chalk uplands. All the familiar forms of earthwork from causewayed camps and long barrows to round barrow groups and hillforts are covered. Appropriately, they include the monuments of the World Heritage Site centred on Avebury and Stonehenge, but information from the latest fieldwork in those areas ensures up-to-date coverage.

An introductory section provides a brief outline of the conventional sub-divisions of later prehistory (the Mesolithic to the Iron Age). Thereafter, details are offered on how best to reach each site: although there are no maps, National Grid References and useful directions are offered. Some of the sites are on private land and hence the book judiciously warns ‘this guide does not infer rights of way’, deferring to the county’s highway authority for the latest information on footpaths and bridleways. Nonetheless, it describes what can be seen at each site from the best publicly-accessible vantage points. The entries briefly describe the history of investigation at each site and summarize current understanding of its function and date.

The book is beautifully illustrated. The majority of the figures are the author’s own fine colour photographs, although some monochrome archival images are also used where necessary. Arguably the best views are the excellent oblique aerial photographs. Their use as an invaluable aid to comprehension recalls the local tradition pioneered by O. G. S. Crawford and Alexander Keiller in their 1928 work, Wessex from the Air. Evidently, the author enlisted the help of several pilots, employing a range of micro-light and private aircraft to gain the necessary perspective. Because the book focuses on visible sites, most of the subjects are obviously upstanding earthworks. Nonetheless, the photographs include a few soil-marks, crop-marks and excavations to emphasis that even in an area which boasts some of the country’s best-known monuments, many others have been lost from normal view.

It is well known that Wiltshire contains a remarkable number of well-preserved field monuments of various forms, and hence the author is in the enviable position of being able to select the most impressive. Because of the quality and visibility of its ancient monuments, Wiltshire is an ideal region to serve as an introduction for those unfamiliar with prehistoric remains, but equally it is an unceasing source of inspiration for the most experienced archaeologist. The field monuments are complemented by outstanding local museums whose displays reflect the long history of archaeological investigation within the county. Yet, despite the richness of their collections, these museums remain the responsibility of private trusts and societies that constantly struggle to find the necessary resources to conserve and exhibit their assets. It is most commendable, therefore, that Bob Clarke, the author, has written Prehistoric Wiltshire as a personal contribution to the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society’s fund raising effort to re-display the famous Bronze Age gallery at Devizes Museum. There are thus two compelling reasons to buy this excellent book – to guide you to some of the best prehistoric sites in Southern England, and to help display the spectacular objects found in some of those sites.

Sponsored by The Stonehenge Tour Companyhttps://stonehengetours.com/

Merlin says “Visiting Wiltshire ? Buy this book!”

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website





STONEHENGE SUMMER SOLSTICE 2012

25 04 2012

Stonehenge is an ancient pre-historic site. It has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Summer Solstice since time immemorial.

Stonehenge Summer Solstice 2012

Stonehenge Summer Solstice 2012

English Heritage is pleased to be providing Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for the Summer Solstice. Please help us to create a peaceful occasion by taking personal responsibility and following the Conditions of Entry and guidelines set out on the following pages. We have a duty of care to ensure public safety and are responsible for the protection of Stonehenge and its surrounding Monuments. If we are to ensure that future access is sustainable, it is essential that everyone observes and abides by these Conditions of Entry.

During the Summer Solstice access to Stonehenge, we support all individuals and groups conducting their own forms of ceremony and celebration providing that they are mutually respectful and tolerant of one another. It is a place seen by many as a sacred site – therefore please respect it and those attending.

English Heritage continues to work closely with the many agencies and people from all sectors of the community and we would like to thank them for their help and support.

Parking and entry to the Monument will be free, subject to the Conditions of Entry. Please do not arrive at the Solstice Car Park or Stonehenge in advance of the opening times listed below:

SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS
1900 hours (7pm) Wednesday 20th June
ACCESS TO STONEHENGE
1900 hours (7pm) Wednesday 20th June

LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK
0600 hours (6am) Thursday 21st June
STONEHENGE CLOSES
0800 hours (8am) Thursday 21st June
SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED
1200 hours (12 Noon) Thursday 21st June – see the pages on Travel and Parking for further information on travel and parking arrangements.
WE HOPE THE WEATHER WILL BE KIND AND WISH YOU A PEACEFUL AND CELEBRATORY SOLSTICE.
Sunset and sunrise occur at the following times:

  • Sunset on Wednesday 20th June 2012 is at 2126 hrs (9.26pm)
  • Sunrise on Thursday 21st June 2012 is at 0452 hrs (4.52am)TRANSPORT FROM LONDON: As usual our friends at The ‘Stonehenge Tour Company’ will be providing tours and transport from London – click here

ENGLISH HERITAGE CONDITIONS OF ENTRYCLICK HERE

Helpful links

For directions, click here.
For bookings, dog policy etc., you need to contact English Heritage, click here, the custodians of the site.
For special access to the Stones (not during the Solstice), click here.
The Avebury complex is a must on your itinerary and only a short journey, north, from Stonehenge. There is free, open access to the whole of this huge site. click here for more information.
Stonehenge and Solstice News / updates: https://twitter.com/#!/ST0NEHENGE 

Link Source: http://www.efestivals.co.uk/festivals/stonehenge/2012/
Link source: http://www.visit-stonehenge.org/2012/04/summer-solstice-celebrations-at.html

Merlin says “Respect the Stones and see you there”









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