Midwinter walk: Explore the ancient Stonehenge Landscape on the Winter Solstice with National Trust

5 12 2014

On the midwinter solstice, explore the ancient monuments of the Stonehenge landscape. This walk is around four and a half miles.

21st December 2014: Ancient ceremonial landscape of great archaeological and wildlife interest:Stonehenge Landscape

Within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle.

Walking across the grassland, visitors can discover other prehistoric monuments, including the Avenue and King Barrow Ridge with its Bronze Age burial mounds.

Nearby, Winterbourne Stoke Barrows is another fascinating example of a prehistoric cemetery. While Durrington Walls hides the remains of a Neolithic village.

Today thanks to their extensive programme turning ploughed fields into pasture, you can explore the landscape and follow in the footsteps of the people who built and used Stonehenge.

Booking essential: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehenge-landscape/things-to-see-and-do/events/

National Trust Stonehenge Landscape Tours:  http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehenge-landscape/

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Stonehenge experiment to be repeated with ‘lost’ stones

14 11 2014

Another attempt is to be made to solve the mystery of how the largest stones used to build Stonehenge were moved.

The experiment was first carried out in a BBC documentary in 1996

The experiment was first carried out in a BBC documentary in 1996

In 1996, a BBC TV programme aimed to find out how the stones for the largest trilithon were put into place, and how the lintel was placed on top.

Since then the concrete replicas have remained untouched and forgotten about at an army base on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire.

They have now been rediscovered and the experiment will be repeated.

Archaeologist Julian Richards is teaming up with farmer Tim Daw see if modern techniques are any more efficient.

Mr Daw, who farms at All Cannings, near Devizes, and who created the first “Neolithic” long barrow to be built in the UK for 5,500 years, also works part-time at Stonehenge.

He said one of the most popular questions asked by visitors is ‘how were the giant stones moved?’.

“When Julian Richards mentioned there was a life-sized replica of the largest stones at Stonehenge that were looking for a home that we could do some experiments on I said ‘let’s do it’.”

The 45-tonne replicas were used in the BBC documentary Secrets of Lost Empires: Stonehenge, which was broadcast in 1996.

They have remained at Larkhill Camp, about a mile from Stonehenge ever since.

The experiment was partially successful, but now new theories have emerged about how the stones may have been moved.

“The first thing is to collect the stones from Salisbury Plain where they have been languishing for the past 20 years and get them back to my farm,” said Mr Daw.

“Hopefully next year we’ll get some teams of people [to take part in the experiment]”

Mr Daw said different theories had now emerged about how the huge stones could have been moved.

“The experts certainly think they know more. Whether they actually do know more is an interesting question.

“Without trying all the wonderful ideas of how you do it Neolithic style, just using man power – no wheels, no draught animals, no machinery – we can’t tell what is practical and what is just fantasy.”

It is hoped the result of the experiment will be turned into another television programme to air next year.

Full story: BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-30041330

Merlin at Stonehenge
Stonehenge News Blog





Step back in time at Stonehenge this winter

14 11 2014

Visitors to Stonehenge are being invited to step through the doorways of its Neolithic houses and into prehistory this winter as expert-led events and demonstrations are offered for the first time.#

Full programme of events and demonstrations:

Making Musical instruments

Sat 15 – Sun 16 Nov & Sat 24 – Sun 25 Jan, 10am–4pm

See Corwen Broch as he creates instruments from natural materials and demonstrates the sounds

of the Neolithic period.

Prehistoric Pottery

Sat 22 – Sun 23 Nov and Sat 20 – Sun 21 Dec, 10am–4pm

Using a handling collection of replica pots, tools and artefacts, Graham Taylor will show you how to make your own pottery tool kit, decorate replica pots as well as how to fire them using authentic prehistoric methods.

Fire & Life

Sat 6 – Sun 7 Dec, Sat 10 – Sun 11 Jan and Sat 14 – Sun 15 Feb, 10am–4pm

Guy Hagg demonstrates all things essential to Neolithic life, from fire lighting, game preparation using flint tools, early cooking methods to making weapons, bone and antler tools and the everyday utensils used at this time.

Flint Knapping

Sat 8 – Sun 9 Nov, Sat 13 – Sun 14 Dec, Sat 17 – Sun 18 Jan and Sat 21 – Sun 22 Feb,  10am–4pm

Join expert Karl Lee, as he demonstrates how Neolithic flint tools were produced using authentic techniques and tools. See a Flint Knapper at work in the setting of Stonehenge’s Neolithic houses.

Basket Weaving

Sat 29 – Sun 30 Nov, 10am–4pm

Kim Creswell makes baskets using the primitive flint tools of the Neolithic age. See her work raw materials found in the landscape into a working basket in just one day.

Heaven & Earth

Sat 22 Nov, Sat 13 Dec, Sat 24 Jan and Sat 21 Feb, 5–6.30pm

Book onto one of these special evening tours learning about the stars and planetary movements and how early man may have utilised them. Over 12s only. Under 16s should be accompanied by an adult.  Booking required.*

Textile Demonstrations

Sat 31 Jan – Sun 1 Feb, Sat 28 Feb – Sun 1 Mar, 10am–4pm

Sally and Gareth Pointer will work with a variety of natural fabric crafts over these weekends including cord making, twining, looped weaving, netting and leatherwork. See bone and antler worked and discover how materials were used in the Neolithic period.

Secrets  of the Stones

Mon 16 – Fri 20 Feb, 10.30am–4.30pm

Bring the family this half-term to uncover the ancient past of these mysterious stones as we explore the history of their role in the lives of ancient man.

Bronze Casting

Sat 3 – Sun 4, Jan and Sat 7 – Sun 8 Feb, 10am–4pm

Watch demonstrations by Neil Burridge of the amazing Bronze Age casting, which helped primitive man to develop.

The Stone Age is being brought to life through a fascinating range of weekend demonstrations from the people who made the replica objects on display in the houses and the exhibition.

Visitors will understand how Neolithic people turned stones into essential every day tools and other natural materials into pots, musical instruments, clothes and baskets.

Watch Bronze Age casting and book onto our very special Heaven and Earth tours which will introduce you to the stars and how they were also essential tools of the Neolithic people living in and using the Stonehenge landscape.

Join Corwen Broch, musician and instrument maker, will create instruments from natural materials and demonstrates the sounds of the Neolithic.

And expert flint knapper Karl Lee will demonstrate how Neolithic flint tools were produced using authentic techniques and tools.

Get hands on with Neolithic pots as Graham Taylor uses a handling collection of replica pots, tools and artefacts to show you how to make your own pottery tool kit, decorate replica pots as well as how to fire them using authentic prehistoric methods.

Many of the replica pots you see in the Stonehenge visitor centre and Neolithic houses are made by Graham.

He says: “Pottery is one of the commonest finds from Neolithic and Bronze Age sites. There is far more to this prehistoric technology than meets the eye – the craftspeople who created the pottery of the Stonehenge landscape had a deep understanding of their materials and processes.

“The pots themselves formed part of the everyday lives of the people who made and used them.”

Guy Hagg, one of the volunteers who helped build the Neolithic Houses and also works as a house interpreter, will be demonstrating the essentials of Neolithic life, from fire lighting, game preparation using flint tools, early cooking methods to making weapons, bone and antler tools and the everyday utensils used at this time.

Many of the replica pots you see in the Stonehenge visitor centre and Neolithic houses are made by Graham.

He says: “Pottery is one of the commonest finds from Neolithic and Bronze Age sites. There is far more to this prehistoric technology than meets the eye – the craftspeople who created the pottery of the Stonehenge landscape had a deep understanding of their materials and processes.

“The pots themselves formed part of the everyday lives of the people who made and used them.”

Guy Hagg, one of the volunteers who helped build the Neolithic Houses and also works as a house interpreter, will be demonstrating the essentials of Neolithic life, from fire lighting, game preparation using flint tools, early cooking methods to making weapons, bone and antler tools and the everyday utensils used at this time.

Kim Creswell will be making baskets using the primitive flint tools of the Neolithic age. See her turn raw materials found in the landscape into a working basket in just one day.

At textile demonstrations, in January and February, Sally and Gareth Pointer will work with a variety of natural fabric crafts over these weekends including cord making, twining, looped weaving, netting and leatherwork. See bone and antler worked and discover how materials were used in the Neolithic period.

Watch Neil Burridge reveal the secrets of Bronze Age casting – a huge step forward in the development of primitive societies.

The ancient past of the mysterious stones will be explored with families in February half-term as we look at the history of their role in the lives of ancient man.

The Neolithic houses were built by volunteers and are based on the excavations of domestic dwellings found at nearby Durrington Walls during excavations in 2007. It has been suggested that the original structures may have been the houses of the Neolithic people who built and used Stonehenge.

During the winter, Stonehenge is open from 9.30am-5pm with last admissions at 3pm. All weekend demonstrations run between 10am and 4pm.

Article source:

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog

 





Guided Tours of Stonehenge

18 01 2010


I am a professional tour guide who can provide ‘private’ guided sightseeing tours of Stonehenge for small groups.
I specialise in Stonehenge and ancient Britain and can often get permission from the English Heritage to take you beyond the fences and touch the Stones after the site is closed to the public. (special access or inner circle tours)

Private tours can depart from London, Salisbury, Bath or Bristol

Some of my popular ‘favourite’ day tour itineraries include:
King Arthur Day Tour
Stonehenge
Glastonbury and King Arthurs Avalon
Challice Well Gardens (reputed buriel site of the Holy Grail
Avebury Stone Circle
Silbury Hill

Great Heritage Trail Day Tour
Stonehenge
Roman City of Bath
Lacock Village
Castle Coombe

Wessex Explorer Day Tour
Salisbury Cathedral
Old Sarum Hillfort
Stonehenge
Avebury Stone Circle
Chalk Hill figures
Buriel Mounds
Crop Circles (April to Septemeber)

However, private bespoke tours can be tailored to suit your requirements and can offer the ultimate flexibility throughout your day (s) visiting almost any location you wish to visit.

I promise a well balanced day with continuous information about not only the places we visit but England in general. My style of touring guarantees an informative, entertaining day, certainly never boring.
I frequently see so called ‘professional’ guides giving an uninspired hasty tour of tourist attractions and then demand huge tips for their ‘sloppy’ services at the end of the day.
MY MISSION STATEMENT: In the unlikely event of you not being entirely satisfied with my services I will NOT charge you!

I truly appreciate that many of you will only visit Stonehenge or England once and deserve a great experience.
I can supply 100’s of testimonials from satisfied customers (individuals/ families/groups) and have a 1st class reputation with many of the UK tour operators. (my heads getting bigger and bigger the more I write) Seriously folks, give me the opportunity to quote for your private group tour (1 – 16 passangers) and I wont disappoint.
By contacting me direct you can also ‘cut out the middle man’ i.e travel agents who add a big fat commission for doing little
Direct Email: tour.guide@rocketmail.com








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