New Stonehenge visitor centre to be filled with never-before-seen artefacts

1 03 2013

Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum will be lending around 250 objects to the new visitors centre at Stonehenge.

DSCF0076The facility will be home to a special exhibition area and is due to be completed before the end of the year.

The museum have all the finds from every 20th Century excavation.

Adrian Green is the Director of Salisbury and South Wiltshire, he says many have never been seen:

“We’ve got antler picks and bones and remains of people who were actually excavated at the monument it itself. These are things that people have never seen before and are thousands of years old, that’s what’s really going to blow people’s minds.”

The Museum’s collections span the history and archaeology of Salisbury and south Wiltshire, from prehistoric times to the present day. The Museum is Designated by the Arts Council as having archaeology collections of outstanding national importance

Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum

Stonehenge & Prehistory
Stonehenge is a unique monument standing at the heart of an extensive archaeological landscape on Salisbury Plain. Finds from excavations at Stonehenge are held at the Museum, as well as important discoveries such as the Monkton Deverill Torc and the Amesbury Archer burial.

Art of Stonehenge
As well as collecting objects from Stonehenge, the Museum has an extensive range of paintings, prints and drawings of the monument. These include some of the earliest known depictions of the stone circle, as well as works by contemporary artists.

Link Article: http://www.spirefm.co.uk
Link: http://www.StonehenegTours.com
Link: http://www.salisburymuseum.org.uk/

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Stonehenge Lecture by Mike Pearson. Wiltshire Heritage Museum

28 01 2013

Prof Mike Parker Pearson, who will be presenting the latest scientific results from laboratory analysis following a decade of fieldwork in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. 2(:30 pm, Saturday, 23 February, 2013)

A striking and original interpretation of the awesome Stone Age site from one of the world's foremost archaeologists on death and burial"

A striking and original interpretation of the awesome Stone Age site from one of the world’s foremost archaeologists on death and burial”

New research over the last year has provided fascinating insights into the lives of the people of Stonehenge and why they built this enigmatic and mysterious monument. Mike Parker Pearson will talk about his new book Stonehenge: exploring the greatest Stone Age mystery, and will present the latest scientific results coming out of laboratory analysis following a decade of fieldwork in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. This includes new light on the people buried at Stonehenge, and on the settlement of the builders at the nearby henge of Durrington Walls. He will also reveal the results of new research into the provisioning of Stonehenge, including the search for its quarries in Wiltshire and west Wales, to show how the act of building Stonehenge involved people from all over prehistoric Britain.

Mike has spent many years researching Stonehenge and its environment, particularly during the Stonehenge Riverside project. He is Professor of British Later Prehistory at UCL Institute of Archaeology.
http://www.wiltshireheritage.org.uk

Booking:

* Tel: 01380 727369 (office hours Tuesday to Friday 10am to 5pm)

Saturday afternoon lectures start at 2.30pm and last approx. one hour.
This lecture is being held at Devizes Town Hall, just a short walk from the Museum.

 Cost:   £6 (£3.50 WANHS members)

‘See you there’
Merlin @ Stonehenge





Lasers at Stonehenge. British Archaelogy

12 10 2012

At last, after all these years, we’ve got the very first comprehensive study of the actual stones at Stonehenge. As part of its research into Stonehenge and its landscape that will feed into displays at the new visitor centre, English Heritage commissioned Greenhatch Group surveyors to produce the first complete, high resolution 3D digital model of Stonehenge and its immediate landscape, using lasers and a bit of photogrammetry. (http://mikepitts.wordpress.com/)

At last, after all these years, we’ve got the very first comprehensive study of the actual stones at Stonehenge

Then Marcus Abbott (ArcHeritage) and Hugo Anderson-Whymark (freelance lithics specialist) analysed the data, created new digital images and news ways of seeing them, added some of their own photos and spent time amongst the real stones.

In one sense the results are not surprising: it was obvious to anyone with eyes that that we could learn a lot about Stonehenge with a proper study of the stones. And yes, we have learnt a lot. But just about all the details are revelatory.

There are four different areas where new things are really going to change the way we think about the monument:

  • how the stones were dressed and what the original monument looked like
  • prehistoric carvings – difficult to see and unknown to visitors: the new discoveries have doubled the number of such carvings known in the whole of Britain
  • damage by tourists: the scale of damage done by souvenir collectors in the 18th and 19th centuries had not been recognised before
  • graffiti: dates range between 1721 and 1866, though most were carved 1800–1850 – and they’re almost everywhere.

And this must be just the beginning. There are more details yet to see (there is still scope for new and higher resolution survey), and new things to think about in the vast data set.

http://mikepitts.wordpress.com/

If you know Stonehenge, from this alone you can see at once how much new information has been revealed. Amongst other things, it seems fair to draw from this (and other new data) that the sarsen circle probably WAS complete; and that the whole thing was designed to be seen from the north-east, approaching up the Avenue – so the implication follows that the setting midwinter sun you’d be facing to the south-west was the key alignment.

British Archaeology also published the pioneering Stonehenge laser study done in 2002.

Please follow Mike Pitts excellent archaelogy Blog: http://mikepitts.wordpress.com/
L
ink: http://www.archaeologyuk.org/ba/ba73/index.shtml
L
ink: http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/

 

British Archaeology magazine

 

The Council for British Archaeology’s award-winning bi-monthly magazine is the authoritative, in-depth source of information and comment on what’s new, interesting and important in UK archaeology.
Link: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/british-archaeology-magazine

Blog sponsored by ‘Stonehenge Guided Tours’ www.StonehengeTours.com

The Stonehenge News Blog





The Stonehenge Landscape Project. Lecture: 10th December 2011

19 11 2011

 

Recent Analytical survey and investigation in the World Heritage Site, by David Field.

Saturday LectureMonuments within the Stonehenge Landscape have rarely been subject to survey techniques in modern times and in many cases reliance has been placed on Ordnance Survey depictions of the early 20th century. In advance of the establishment of a new visitor centre and to complement and support the recent university programmes of excavation in the area, English Heritage has been conducting the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project to determine what non-destructive survey techniques can tell us about the area. Using ground survey, aerial photography, lidar and laser scanning a number of fresh and sometimes surprising conclusions emerge. This talk will outline the results so far.

David Field is a senior landscape archaeologist at English Heritage. He has undertaken extensive research into the prehistory of Salisbury Plain and the Vale of Pewsey, including the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. Publications include ‘Earthen Long Barrows’ 2006),‘The story of Silbury Hill’ (co author with Jim Leary, 2010), ‘The Field Archaeology of the Salisbury Plain Training Area’ (2002) and ‘Ancient water management on Salisbury Plain’ in Patterns of the Past: Essays in Landscape Archaeology (1999). He has also contributed a number of articles to WANHM, most recently as one of the joint authors of the reports on the Breamore jadeite axehead and the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Midden at East Chisenbury, in Volume 103 (2010).

Saturday afternoon lectures start at 2.30pm and last approx. one hour.

Booking:

Contact the Bookings Secretary if you would like to be added to a reserve list:
* Tel: 01380 727369 (10am to 5pm Monday to Saturday)
* Send an e-mail.
Cost:   £5 (£3 for WANHS members)

Visiting Stonehenge ?  Visit the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes:  http://www.wiltshireheritage.org.uk

Sponsored by The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website








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