VISITING Stonehenge during the Summer Solstice has been voted as one of the top 25 life experiences in the world today.

18 05 2014

Stonehenge is one of 25 top life experiences

Salisbury Journal: The ancient stone monument Stonehenge.

The ancient stone monument Stonehenge

VISITING Stonehenge during the Summer Solstice has been voted as one of the top 25 life experiences in the world today.

The ultimate Wonder List of must-do life experiences was created following a study commissioned to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Discovery Channel.

An expert panel, which included adventurer Bear Grylls and editors of Wanderlust, Lonely Planet Traveller Magazine and National Geographic Traveller, created a long-list of the must-do worldwide experiences, which a poll of 2,000 British adults then cut to a shortlist of 25.

The most popular life experience was to visit the North Cape in Norway to see the Aurora Borealis, a stunning natural light display, followed by snorkelling along the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and a road trip along Route 66 in America.

Stonehenge came 18th in the list, one of only two British experiences to make the list. The other, celebrating Hogmanay in Edinburgh, was number 23.

Susanna Dinnage, managing director of Discovery Networks UK & Ireland, said: “It’s lovely to see great British experiences, such as visiting Stonehenge during the Summer Solstice, figure so highly on the list. Be it adventures on home soil or experiencing life-defining moments further afield, we believe there’s always more to know, to experience and to explore.

As we celebrate 25 years of broadcasting in the UK, the Wonder List embodies Discovery’s continued passion to inspire the nation, expand horizons and make your world bigger.”

They were also asked to nominate the best life experiences to be had in the UK, and visiting Stonehenge during the Summer Solstice got more than a third of the vote, as well as the seven natural wonders of the UK and the seven manmade wonders of the UK, with Stonehenge also topping the latter with over half the nation’s vote.

The findings revealed over half of us have private wonder list of experiences we want to complete and a lack of money is the number on reason stopping people completing their own wonder list.

Article source: By Corey Ross (Salisbury Journal):

Link: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk/news/11220485.display/?ref=twtrec

English Heritage Open Access: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/summer-solstice/

Stonehenge Summer Solstice Tours:
Premium Tours: http://bestvaluetours.co.uk/tour-of-england/out-of-london-tours/stonehenge-summer-solstice-celebration-see-the-sunset-standing-within-the-centre-of-the-stone-circle-284

Stonehenge Guided Tours: http://www.stonehengetours.com/stonehenge-summer-solstice-tour.htm

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre by Denton Corker Marshall Architects has won an RIBA South West Award 2014

10 05 2014

Honour for Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre.  Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre by Denton Corker Marshall Architects has won an RIBA South West Award 2014 from the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre by Denton Corker Marshall Architects has won an RIBA South West Award

Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre by Denton Corker Marshall Architects has won an RIBA South West Award

The £6.9m building, named in a prestigious ceremony at City Hall, Bristol, yesterday, takes an Australian aboriginal dictum of ‘touching the earth lightly’ to perch on an archaeological landscape creating a vastly improved visitor experience.

A major part of the £27million Stonehenge Environmental Improvements Programme – the largest capital project ever undertaken by English Heritage – the new visitor building, is 2.1km (1.5 miles) to the west of Stonehenge.

RIBA South West Awards recognise examples of innovative and outstanding new architecture within the region.

Chair of the jury, John Pardey of multiple award-winning John Pardey Architects said of the English Heritage project: “The building follows the concept sketch by the architect Barry Marshall.

“A forest of thin square columns dancing at different angles likes tree trunks, supporting a curvy canopy roof, which has fretted edges like leaves meeting the sky. Spaces are laid out with precise clarity and work fabulously well’.

‘The visitor centre provides an essentially outdoor experience and that is as it should be on this wide Wiltshire landscape’.

RIBA South West regional director Jon Watkins said ‘The RIBA South West Awards always bring out the best in local and national architects across our vast region. It is delightful that Salisbury Plain is a focus for local success and quality this year, and I commend the client and architects for their work in raising the profile of architecture nationally and in Wiltshire’.

RIBA South West Award winners will also be considered for a highly-coveted RIBA National Award in recognition of their architectural excellence, which will be announced in June.

The shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize for the best building of the year will be drawn from the RIBA National Award-winning buildings later in the year.

The full list of the 11 no. RIBA South West Award winners are:

1. Architecture Archive, Somerset (Hugh Strange Architects, London)

2. Lakeshore, Bristol (Ferguson Mann, Bristol)

3. Officers Field, Portland (HTA Design LLP, London)

4. Poole Harbour Second Crossing/Twin Sails Bridge, Poole (Wilkinson Eyre, London)

5. Porthmeor Artist’s Studios & Fishermen’s Cellars, St Ives (Long & Kentish Architects, London)

6. Royal William Yard Staircase, Plymouth (Gillespie Yunnie, Dartington, Devon)

7. Stonehenge Exhibition & Visitor Centre, Wiltshire (Denton Corker Marshall, London)

8. The Exchange, Falmouth University (Burwell Deakins, London)

9. The Lee Building, Bath (Feilden Fowles, London in association with FCB Studios, Bath)

10. The Wilson, Cheltenham Gallery & Museum (Berman Guedes Stretton, London)

11. Westering, Chagford, Devon (Annie Martin Architect, Teignmouth)

Article source: http://www.thisiswiltshire.co.uk/news/11202373.Honour_for_Stonehenge_Exhibition_and_Visitor_Centre/

Merlin at Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





Touching the earth lightly: New Stonehenge Visitor Centre wins Royal Institute of British Architects award

10 05 2014

Originally posted on The Heritage Trust:

The Stonehenge Exhibition and Visitor Centre by architects Denton Corker Marshall on opening day last December
©
The Heritage Trust

This is Wiltshire reports -

The £6.9m building, named in a prestigious ceremony at City Hall, Bristol, yesterday, takes an Australian aboriginal dictum of ‘touching the earth lightly’ to perch on an archaeological landscape creating a vastly improved visitor experience. A major part of the £27million Stonehenge Environmental Improvements Programme – the largest capital project ever undertaken by English Heritage – the new visitor building, is 2.1km (1.5 miles) to the west of Stonehenge.

RIBA South West Awards recognise examples of innovative and outstanding new architecture within the region. Chair of the jury, John Pardey of multiple award-winning John Pardey Architects said of the English Heritage project: “The building follows the concept sketch by the architect Barry Marshall. A forest of thin square columns dancing at different angles like tree…

View original 60 more words





The weeds are starting to grow at Stonehenge

10 05 2014

Originally posted on Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper:

stones

The works are far from over, but the visitor centre is starting to bed in, there is less bare mud about and on a wet sky windy spring day it was possible to experience a bit of the Stonehenge we will be learning to know in future. It feels good.

I was there for a press view of what English Heritage grandly calls its “external gallery”, the near complete group of imagined neolithic houses round the back of the visitor centre. Whether or not they are in the least bit neolithic (wheat ears dangling from the thatch look suspicious), the houses are fun and I imagine will be popular with visitors, especially kids. Until newly planted trees grow up to obscure them, they make a nice earthy, rounded contrast to Denton Corker Marshall’s ephemeral linearity.

We walked to the stones with Heather Sebire as guide – the first time I…

View original 110 more words





Amesbury – including Stonehenge – is the UK’s longest continually-occupied settlement

6 05 2014

Amesbury in Wiltshire confirmed as oldest UK settlement.

A Wiltshire town has been confirmed as the longest continuous settlement in the United Kingdom.

Amesbury - including Stonehenge - is the UK's longest continually-occupied settlement

Amesbury – including Stonehenge – is the UK’s longest continually-occupied settlement

Amesbury, including Stonehenge, has been continually occupied since BC8820, experts have found.

The news was confirmed following an archaeological dig which also unearthed evidence of frogs’ legs being eaten in Britain 8,000 years before France.

Amesbury’s place in history has also now been recognised by the Guinness Book of Records.

David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, said: “The site blows the lid off the Neolithic Revolution in a number of ways.

“It provides evidence for people staying put, clearing land, building, and presumably worshipping, monuments.

“The area was clearly a hub point for people to come to from many miles away, and in many ways was a forerunner for what later went on at Stonehenge itself.

“The first monuments at Stonehenge were built by these people. For years people have been asking why is Stonehenge where it is, now at last, we have found the answers.”

Mr Jacques said the River Avon, which runs through the area, would have been like an A road with people travelling along it.

“They may have had the equivalent of local guides and there would have been feasting,” he added.

“We have found remains of big game animals, such as aurochs and red deer, and an enormous amount of burnt flint from their feasting fires.”

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The dig unearthed the largest haul of worked flints from the Mesolithic period

Previously, Thatcham in Berkshire, 40 miles from Amesbury, held the record for the longest continuous settlement in the country.

The dig in Amesbury also uncovered 31,000 worked flints in 40 days as well as animal bones such as frogs’ legs.

Mr Jacques said our ancestors were eating a “Heston Blumenthal-style menu”.

The find was based on a report by fossil mammal specialist Simon Parfitt, of the Natural History Museum.

Andy Rhind-Tutt, the founder of Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust, said there was “something unique and rather special about the area” to keep people there from the end of the Ice Age, to when Stonehenge was created and until today.

“The fact that the feasting of large animals and the discovery of a relatively constant temperature spring sitting alongside the River Avon, may well be it,” he said.

The dig was filmed and made into a documentary by the BBC, Smithsonian, CBC and others to be screened later in the summer.

The project was led by the University of Buckingham

Article source: BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-27238503

Historic Amesbury – the Home of Stonehenge

Nestling within a loop of the River Avon alongside the A303 just 1.5 miles from Stonehenge, Amesbury is a destination not to be missed. With recent evidence of continuous settlement since before 7500BC and a breath-taking Mesolithic collection that is greater in quantity (from one single location) than any other found in this country, the town’s new Museum at the Melor Hall, Church Street will amaze visitors with its story of life before the Stones and its mind blowing artefacts from the Town where History began.

Visit Wiltshire Website: http://www.visitwiltshire.co.uk/ideas-and-inspiration/amesbury-museum-and-heritage-centre-p1536253

Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust: https://www.facebook.com/AmesburyMuseum

Salisbury Reds (transport to and from Amesbury): http://www.salisburyreds.co.uk/ptv-amesbury.shtml

Local Tour Operators including Amesbury and Stonehenge:
Salisbury, Stonehenge and Sarum Audio Tours: http://www.salisburystonehengetours.co.uk/
The Stonehenge Travel Company: http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

The Stonehenge News Blog

 





2014 Summer Solstice at Stonehenge

6 05 2014

English Heritage is pleased to be providing Managed Open Access to Stonehenge for the Summer Solstice on 20-21 June 2014. Please help us to create a peaceful occasion by taking personal responsibility and following the Conditions of Entry and guidelines set out on these pages. The full Conditions of Entry can also be downloaded from their website.

midsummer-sunset

We have a duty of care to ensure public safety and are responsible for protecting Stonehenge and its surrounding Monuments. If we are to ensure that future access is sustainable, it is essential that everyone observes and abides by these Conditions of Entry.

Celebrating the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is an ancient prehistoric site and has been a place of worship and celebration at the time of Summer Solstice since time immemorial.

During Managed Open Access for Summer Solstice at Stonehenge, we support all individuals and groups conducting their own forms of ceremony and celebration providing that they are mutually respectful and tolerant of one another. It is a place seen by many as a sacred site – therefore please respect it and those attending.

English Heritage continues to work closely with the many agencies and people from all sectors of the community and we would like to thank them for their help and support.

Parking and entry to the Monument will be free, subject to the Conditions of Entry.  Please do not arrive at the Solstice car park or Stonehenge in advance of the opening times listed below.

Please note: As Summer Solstice this year occurs on a Friday/Saturday, the roads around Stonehenge will be very busy. We strongly advise visitors to leave their cars at home and travel to Stonehenge using public transport. See Travel for further information. 

You can also follow @eh_stonehenge on Twitter for travel updates on the night.

Timings for Summer Solstice at Stonehenge

  • SOLSTICE CAR PARK OPENS
    19.00 hours (7pm) Friday 20 June
  • ACCESS TO STONEHENGE
    19.00 hours (7pm) Friday 20 June
  • LAST ADMISSION TO SOLSTICE CAR PARK
    06.00 hours (6am) Saturday 21 June
  • STONEHENGE CLOSES
    08.00 hours (8am) Saturday 21 June
  • SOLSTICE CAR PARK TO BE VACATED
    12.00 hours (12 Noon) Saturday 21 June  

We hope the weather will be kind and wish you a peaceful and celebratory solstice.

Sunset and Sunrise

Sunset and sunrise occur at the following times:

  • Sunset on Friday 20 June 2014 is at 21.26 hrs (9.26pm)
  • Sunrise on Saturday 21 June 2014 is at 04.52 hrs (4.52am)

Link Source: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/summer-solstice/?lang=en

Stonehenge News Blog

 





Tunneling the A303 at Stonehenge is the sensible option – John Glen

29 04 2014

Salisbury’s MP says he’ll keep pushing for traffic problems on the A303 next to Stonehenge to be sorted out once and for all.

John Glen’s told Spire FM that there’s only one logical solution:

“There will be enormous battles between environmentalists, locals who want a Article imagesolution to the issue and the National trust who are the land owner around Stonehenge, and a Tunnel will be the safest option to please everyone.”

The Government’s now started a new feasibility study to look into the possible options and are due to make an announcement in the Autumn.

Mr Glen has a message for the Government as they look into what happens next:

“If I was a transport minister, and I wanted to improve transportation links to the South West; which have been particularly important given what we’ve seen happen over this last winter, then I would need to be pretty sure that any measures I put in place, would avoid there being a bottleneck at Stonehenge.”

Meanwhile, ideas to tunnel part of the A303 past Stonehenge have been described as ‘jumping the gun’ by the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE).

Kate Fielden from the Wiltshire branch of the CPRE is also secretary of the Stonehenge Alliance – she says there are mixed views on the issue at the moment:

“At the present time, the Stonehenge Alliance feels that there is insufficient evidence to show that it would be justified. I do know though, and the CPRE recognises, that there are problems at Stonehenge, especially at weekends and at holiday times. That’s becoming intolerable really for local people.”

Kate also says the local habitat is key and therefore a tunnel could work:

“It’s difficult when you live close by something to stand back and realise that this whole site is something that is considered internationally to be of the highest significance. I think we have to take the bull by the horns and do a proper job if that is the job that has to be done. It would be completely unthinkable to dual that road on the surface.”

Link sourc: http://www.spirefm.co.uk/news/local-news/1268711/tunneling-the-a303-at-stonehenge-is-the-sensible-option—john-glen/

Stonehenge News Blog








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