Stonehenge Vernal (Spring) Equinox 2014

19 03 2014

An equinox occurs twice a year (around 20th March and 22nd September), when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is inclined neither away from nor towards the Sun, the center of the Sun being in the same plane as the Earth’s equator. The exact time of the Equinox this year is March 20th at 16:57 GMT

The name “equinox” is derived from the Latin aequus (equal) and nox (night), because around the equinox, the night and day have approximately equal length.

The ‘Managed Open Access’ at Stonehenge for the Vernal (Spring) Equinox, will be from approximately 05.45 am until 08.30 on 20th March 2014.Stonehenge Equinox Druids

Parking will be limited and cars will have to be moved by 9:00 am.

• Access to Stonehenge for the Spring Equinox will take place on the morning of 20 March 2014.

• Entrance to the monument will commence as soon as ‘light-levels’ are deemed safe enough to permit. For the past couple of years this has occurred around 0545h however EH would ask that people are patient should the morning prove ‘overcast’ and a slight delay occurs.

• Access to Stonehenge will cease at 0830h and the cooperation of all of visitors in ensuring the monument is vacated at this time would be most appreciated. Please note that, in previous years, access for the Equinox ceased earlier at 0800h, however English Heritage has permitted an additional half an hour within the monument for our visitors.

• Temporary toilets (Porta-Loos) will be available at the monument once the site is open for public access. This includes a provision for those with disabilities.

•The Cafe and Shop at the new Visitor Centre at Airmans Cross should be opening for visitors from approximately 0800h on the morning of 20 March. Please note that the toilets at this location will also become available for use at this time. Although the Cafe will be opening only hot and cold drinks will be available for the first hour. Pasties etc will become available after 0900h.

Link source: http://www.sarsen.org/2014/03/spring-or-vernal-equinox-stonehenge-2014.html
Link: http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/the_wheel_of_the_year/solstice_and_equinox_dates_2010_to_2020.asp

Follow Stonehenge Stone Circle on Twitter for live pictures from the Stones: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE
Follow English Heritage on Twitter: https://twitter.com/eh_stonehenge

Have fun and respect the Stones!

Merlin at Stonehenge
Stonehenge Stone Circle Blog





Stonehenge bluestones had acoustic properties, study shows

4 03 2014

The giant bluestones of Stonehenge may have been chosen because of their acoustic properties, claim researchers.

A study has discovered that rocks in the Preseli Hills, the source of some the stones at Stonehenge, have a sonic property

A study has discovered that rocks in the Preseli Hills, the source of some the stones at Stonehenge, have a sonic property

A study shows rocks in the Preseli Hills, the Pembrokeshire source of part of the monument, have a sonic property.

Researcher Paul Devereux said: “It hasn’t been considered until now that sound might have been a factor.”

The study, by London’s Royal College of Art, was to try and record what “Stone Age eyes and ears” would have heard and seen in a prehistoric landscape.

Since the 1920s, it has been known stones quarried in Mynydd Preseli were hauled 199 miles (320 km) to Wiltshire by its makers. But, trying to establish why has been more difficult.

‘Like a bell’

With this study, thousands of stones along the Carn Menyn ridge were tested and a high proportion of them were found to “ring” when they were struck.

“The percentage of the rocks on the Carn Menyn ridge are ringing rocks, they ring just like a bell,” said Mr Devereux, the principal investigator on the Landscape and Perception Project.

“And there’s lots of different tones, you could play a tune.

“In fact, we have had percussionists who have played proper percussion pieces off the rocks.”

Thousands of stones along the Carn Menyn ridge were tested and a high proportion were found to "ring" when struck

Thousands of stones along the Carn Menyn ridge were tested and a high proportion were found to “ring” when struck

According to Mr Devereux, the discovery of the “resonant rocks” could explain why they were selected for Stonehenge.

“There had to be something special about these rocks,” he said.

“Why else would they take them from here all the way to Stonehenge?”

‘Pre-historic glockenspiel’

Built between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC, it has remained a mystery why the monument’s bluestones were lugged all the way from north Pembrokeshire.

But Prof Tim Darvill, who has undertaken hundreds of excavations at Stonehenge, insists “pre-historic attitudes to stone” must have been very different to those of today.

“We don’t know of course that they moved them because they rang but ringing rocks are a prominent part of many cultures,” he said.

“You can almost see them as a pre-historic glockenspiel, if you like and you could knock them and hear these tunes.

“And soundscapes of pre-history are something we’re really just beginning to explore.”

Inside Out was on  BBC1 at 19:30 GMT on Monday.
Full article here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-26417976

Merlin @ Stonehenge
The Stonehenge News Blog





#Stonehenge – 5 musical tributes.

22 02 2014

Originally posted on The Heritage Journal:

Heritage Action and the Heritage Journal, as previously documented, had their beginnings on a web site forum “The Modern Antiquarian“, after the book of the same name written by Julian Cope. Mr Cope is possibly better known for his prime activity as a musician, and yet I don’t recall having had many musically themed entries here on the Journal.

A search on the major music sites for names of ancient monuments brings up a plethora of results, depending upon the monument selected. We decided to start with an obvious one – ‘Stonehenge’. This alone returns over 600 songs on AllMusic.com, with many more on Spotify and YouTube – although the YouTube results are somewhat skewed by videos of festivals, documentaries and travelogues, and duplicate entries. But here are five versions that may, or may not be familiar.

Ylvis – (What’s the Meaning of) Stonehenge (3:55)

This tribute…

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Stonehenge Community Open Days: 20th February and 20th March

13 02 2014

Originally posted on Stonehenge Travel Company:

There are still some spaces left for the 20th February and 20th March open days from 12pm -2pm at the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre. These are free events but you must pre book and call 0870 3331183 stating Stonehenge Community Open Days as the event you want to book onto.  You can book up to 4 people and must be a Wiltshire resident.

The Stonehenge Learning and Outreach Group with ourselves, Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, English Heritage Stonehenge open daysWiltshire Museum Devizes,Wessex Archaeology and National Trust will meet this week and share their learning events that are happening too.

Join us for a series of open days for the local community at the new Stonehenge visitor centre, featuring a special tour with Susan Greaney, Senior Properties Historian and Lisa Holmes, Community Projects manager.

Come and find out about the making of the exhibition, the opportunities for local voices to contribute to…

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18th Century William Stukeley book on Stonehenge is now online.

3 02 2014

In 1740, British vicar William Stukeley published Stonehenge, A Temple Restor’d to the British Druids.

In more than 30 illustrations, Stukeley’s book documents the way Stonehenge appeared when he visited it in the early 18th century. The historian was only the 1-stukely-stonehengesecond scholarly investigator (after the 17th-century antiquarian John Aubrey) to take an interest in the site, and the first to publish a comprehensive account of what he found on his visits,  including images of the way that the monument looked in context of the  surrounding farmland.

In maps and vistas, Stukeley tried to capture the layout of the  monument’s stones. Much of his sense of urgency in the task came from  his belief that the stones’ arrangement needed preservation, as the  monument was under constant threat of vandalism and interference. For  example, Aubrey found and documented 20 stones in one area of the monument; a century later, Stukeley found only five remaining.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre: English Heritage current ‘Set in Stone’ exhibition includes an oil portrait of William Stukeley: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/discover/set-in-stone-exhibition

Link: http://tywkiwdbi.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/1740-book-on-stonehenge-now-online.html
Stonehenge area news on twitter: https://twitter.com/ST0NEHENGE

The Stonehenge News Blog
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William Stukeley’s 1740 book on Stonehenge now online

2 02 2014

Originally posted on The Heritage Trust:

 
Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids by William Stukeley
Harvard University Library
 
Harvard University Library has made available a digitised copy of William Stukeley’s 1740 book, Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids. Printed in London in 1740 the book includes more than 30 illustrations showing how Stonehenge appeared when Stukeley visited it in the early 18th century, along with his theories concerning the monument’s origins and use.
 
 
Prospect of STONEHENGE from the southwest from William Stukeley’s, Stonehenge, a temple restor’d to the British Druids
Harvard University Library
 

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Stonehenge: Winter Archaeology Walk

31 01 2014

Originally posted on The Heritage Trust:

 
Stonehenge in Winter by Walter Williams (1834-1906)
 
A Stonehenge: Winter Archaeology Walk will take place on Saturday, 15 February 2014 from 2:00pm to 4.30pm. In this guided, three mile walk (with views of Stonehenge) participants will visit some of the ancient earthworks that have revealed much about the people who once lived or visited the area. Other points of interest will include the Stonehenge Cursus, the many and varied barrows in the area, and an ancient Avenue that perhaps once connected ceremonial centres.
 
Booking required. Further information here.
   

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